Irish mother trying to make epinephrine more accessible after daughter's fatal reaction

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Caroline Sloan, whose daughter, Emma, died from an allergic reaction to peanuts after eating at a restaurant, has started a campaign to make epinephrine injectors more accessible in Ireland.

The teenager died after ingesting peanut sauce at a local restaurant and while walking along a Dublin footpath after the meal. Her mother held her in her arms as she died, after a nearby pharmacist refused to sell her an EpiPen because she did not have a prescription. The girl died before an ambulance could arrive.

Sloan feels that were EpiPens more accessible, her daughter would still be alive. Her petition asks lawmakers to make EpiPens available at schools and restaurants as well as to have ID cards that allow parents and allergy sufferers to quickly gain access to EpiPens at pharmacies without waiting for paperwork or computer checks.

Although Emma Sloan had been diagnosed with peanut allergy, there was no indication that it could turn fatal, so no prescription to carry an epinephrine injector had been given.

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