California Enacts Law Requiring Schools Carry Epinephrine Injectors

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In September, California passed a new law requiring schools stock epinephrine injectors for use in emergencies when the child has none, even without a prescription. Like many states with similar laws, the requirement allows school nurses and other staff with training to use autoinjectors to save the life of someone on campus who is suffering anaphelaxis, a severe reaction to allergy.

California is one of only eight states which have a requirement for schools to stock epinephrine, most only make it legal to do so without prescriptions. California also requires at least one trained volunteer from school staff be able to use the injectors besides the on-staff nurse.

The law passed and was enacted in September and has now become the rule as California schools stock EpiPens and other autoinjectors under the requirements. The cost of the injectors is less than $300 per pair to comply with California requirements. Training costs more, but can be had from state-run training seminars free of charge.

Currently, centralized training for California educational staff is underway. Some schools are out of compliance for lack of trained personnel, but are working to get on board, a report in the Sacramento Beestates.

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