reactions?

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2001 - 3:48am
Julied's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/23/2001 - 09:00

My 2 year old had what we think was a reaction last night. She is PA/TN. She had a little red blotch next to her mouth. She has very sensitive skin and gets these off and on. I put her in the car and by the time we got home the hives/rash were all over her face and her eyes were swollen. I gave her benadryl and took her to the E.R. with epi-pen in hand. They gave her prednisone and watched her. The swelling and hives went away. My parents are sure that she didn't eat anything unsafe. The cleaning lady was there and Eva was helping her. Could she have a reaction to cleaning products? She often gets little pimply bumps around her mouth, but there is no pattern as to what she eats or drinks before this. The doctor says it could be viral or just irritated skin. What do you think?

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2001 - 4:24am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My first thought was cross-contamination/contact reaction... maybe to what the cleaning lady was using. Any chance she had eaten any peanutty foods before going to your parents'? Was there any evidence of a reaction on your daughter's hands - not that there would be?
Just thinking...
I hope your daughter is okay now and wasn't too shook up by the ER visit.
Take care,
Lam

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2001 - 5:44am
Julied's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/23/2001 - 09:00

The cleaning lady hadn't eaten any peanut things. She knows about Eva's allergy. There were no hives and no rash on her hands or anywhere else. I'm wondering if she got some cleaner on her hands and rubbed her eyes and maybe put her hands in her mouth. I don't know. It seems weird that the reaction was so localized. Her first, and only other reaction was all over her body after eating a bite of a peanut butter cookie. I'm just confused.

Posted on: Fri, 11/09/2001 - 7:19am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

We had a similar reaction in one of our kids two different times. We had been at someone elses home both times. We had the exact same symptoms. It started with red blotches next to her mouth, that spread up her scalp and then across her face. One of the two times, her eye swelled up. We gave her benadryl. I never knew what caused it. We have had triggers to pa since then, and they were fast and severe. I never did understand what caused those 2. I have decided it was probably secondary contact by someone in our friends home. This occured seven years ago, and has not happened since.

Posted on: Mon, 11/12/2001 - 12:05pm
doreen's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/23/2001 - 09:00

I don't really know to much about these things, but there is a list here somewhere. In fact, I specifically remember Pledge being mentioned, so I stay away from that now. I'll try and do a search, but if not maybe you could search under Pledge and see what you come up with.

Posted on: Mon, 11/12/2001 - 1:09pm
julieb's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/21/2001 - 09:00

Sorry to hear about your daughter's reaction. Your story got me thinking about what happened to us over the summer.
My son (now 2) also has sensitive skin and is allergic to gluten, dairy, soy, and peanuts/nuts. When my in-laws were visiting in the summer, my son kept getting hives on his legs. I couldn't figure out why...and that's the worse part of a reaction, that not-knowing-why part.
I kept a food diary thinking, ugh one more food to cross off. But, he hadn't tried any new foods before, during, or after the reaction. Then it dawned on me. When either my MIL or FIL held my son, they would hold him with one arm and with the other arm, hold onto his legs. Either my MIL or FIL must have had something in their hand lotion or perfume/cologne or something because as soon as they left, my son didn't get the rash again.
So, maybe someone used some lipstick, cosmetic, or face cream that had some ingredient your daughter was allergic to and maybe they kissed your daughter to get the reaction going? Then there's the food possibility. I find it useful to do a food diary to record what the child ate several days before the reaction, during, and after the reaction and see if there's any correlation to any foods eaten and a reaction. Hope this helps. Good luck. Warmly, Julie B.

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by krisztina Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:49pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by chicken Thu, 02/20/2020 - 4:45pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by lexy Tue, 01/28/2020 - 12:21am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:15am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by JRM20 Sun, 01/26/2020 - 11:11am
Comments: 5

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

If you find frequent allergy-related food recalls upsetting you are not alone, but a new federal rule may help reduce the cross-contamination...

If you or your child has a peanut or nut allergy, identifying the presence of nuts in food becomes a priority, but what if the written or spoken...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

Welcome to the complex world of being a Peanut Allergy Parent. Get ready to proofread food labels, get creative with meals, and constantly hold an...

Scientists are developing a skin patch, much like the nicotine patch, that may cure deadly peanut allergies.

The patch contains tiny traces...

I love to cook and bake! I remember from a very young age cooking with my grandmother, teaching me all of the basics like making sure to mix in...

Take control of your food allergies! Get results in ten days and change your life forever! If you are tempted to use a home testing kit...

Parents of children with food allergies often share tips about safe foods, allergy-friendly restaurants, and other experiences and challenges of...

According to the results of a new study, children lacking Vitamin D may be more susceptible to food allergies. Researchers working at the Albert...

Nearly all infants are fussy at times. But how do you know when your baby's crying means something wrong? Some babies are excessively fussy...

If children begin to eat many different foods at a young age, there is much more of a chance that by the time they are in school, they will eat...

Those with peanut allergies often find that they are unable to enjoy dessert since there's always the...

If you've ever tried to find...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

Those who have peanut allergies know to avoid peanut butter cookies, of course – but what about other...

Which candy bars are safe for those with peanut allergies? Those without allergies are accustomed to...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

For those who have wondered whether airport x-ray machines negatively affect epinephrine auto-injectors, the folks at Food Allergy Research &...

Molecular allergy component testing identifies the specific food or environmental proteins triggering a person’s allergic reactions. Component...

An epinephrine auto-injector provides an emergency dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) to treat life-threatening allergic reactions. Those who have...