Are all peanut allergies life threatning

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2000 - 1:38am
Mommy's picture
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Joined: 06/20/2000 - 09:00

My daughter is 18 months old and has just been confirmed by the allergist that she is allergic to peanuts. The reaction she had was swolen eyes and hives. Are all peanut allergies life threatning - anaphalaxis?? Do all people with this allergy have a risk of being anaphalaxis or are there some mild cases of this allergy??

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2000 - 1:53am
san103's picture
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Joined: 03/27/2000 - 09:00

pYou may want to search the boards for discussions on this topic. Many people ask this question when they first discover their child is allergic to peanuts and/or nuts./p
pNot all people who are allergic to peanut will have life threatening reactions, BUT there is not way to know who will and who will not. If one reaction is not serious, one has NO way of knowing if the next reaction will be more serious, or the same as the first. Therefore everyone with a peanut allergy must operate knowing that any interaction with peanuts could be life threatening allergy./p
pIs is overwhelming at first, but it does just become part of life and learn to live with it./p

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2000 - 1:57am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pMommy,/p
pI have found that reading all the links provided in the Home page of this website to be most beneficial./p
pI found some anaphalaxis statistics in the article called "Peanut Allergy, Where Do We Stand" by Dr. John Weisnagel. You can find this under the Links section on the homepage here./p
pPeanut allergies can be pretty scary at first, but I've found, personally, that reading all the medical journals and articles can be comforting./p
p[This message has been edited by LMojoe (edited June 20, 2000).]/p

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2000 - 2:23am
mkruby's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2000 - 09:00

pDid the doctor tell you it was life threatening? My daughter is allergic to peanuts and is a cat 2, which means it can't kill her at this point in time..what it does mean is she has it and from our own personal experience with pa, she has an extremely high chance of it becoming life threatening. Her brothers are both anaphylactic to pa and other allergens./p

Posted on: Tue, 06/20/2000 - 2:27am
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Joined: 06/13/2000 - 09:00

pWhen we found out both our daughters were allergic, we planned for the worst and hoped for the best. We made it clear to all friends, relatives, and schools up front if it could be life threatening, we will treat it as such. As it turns out, it was life threatening for both of them./p
pNow they are 14 and 11 years old and doing very well. We have had some close calls, but not serious enough for using the epi-pen./p

Posted on: Sat, 06/24/2000 - 3:38am
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Joined: 06/24/2000 - 09:00

pDear Daddy,br /
I am interested in your description of close call with your daughters.How did their symptoms present that were close calls?My little boy has severe allergies.He got the epipen 3 times this week for swelling of the face etc./p

Posted on: Sat, 06/24/2000 - 4:11am
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Joined: 02/17/1999 - 09:00

pTheDaddy said it well. Plan for the worst, hope for the best. Each and every reaction differs and it is important not to let down your guard. My brother for years had reactions but not anaphylactic ones and then suddenly one day accidentally ingested a very tiny amount and went into anaphylactic shock. My husband and I exercise caution while trying to ensure that my son has as close to "normal" life as possible. My advice to you is to not be taken over by the fear of what might happen and deal with each new situation and its inherent risks as logically and calmly as possible. We work very hard at being very matter of fact about the allergy with our son. Hope this helps. Also, try to find a local anaphylaxis support group to join so that you will have others to talk to. Take care. Email me if you want to talk more./p

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2000 - 3:21am
Joanne's picture
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

pThis may be of interest:/p
pThere is a study in the March Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology written by Drs. Sicherer, Morrow and Sampson titled "Dose response in double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenges in children with atopic dermatitis". They reviewed challenge data for all positive challenges to 6 common allergenic foods in children with atopic dermatitis evaluated for food allergy over a 13-year period. The 6 foods were egg, milk, soy, wheat, peanut and fish. Their conclusion: This food allergic population may react to as little as 100 mg of food, possibly less, and the dose causing a reaction and the severity of reaction is not predicted by Prick Skin Test or RAST (blood test)./p
pI can't get the link up for this, but if you go to the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology or Medline you can look it up./p

Posted on: Sun, 06/25/2000 - 8:42am
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Joined: 02/22/1999 - 09:00

pThis may be of interest:/p
pThere is a study in the March Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology written by Drs. Sicherer, Morrow and Sampson titled "Dose response in double-blind, placebo-controlled oral food challenges in children with atopic dermatitis". They reviewed challenge data for all positive challenges to 6 common allergenic foods in children with atopic dermatitis evaluated for food allergy over a 13-year period. The 6 foods were egg, milk, soy, wheat, peanut and fish. Their conclusion: This food allergic population may react to as little as 100 mg of food, possibly less, and the dose causing a reaction and the severity of reaction is not predicted by Prick Skin Test or RAST (blood test)./p
pI can't get the link up for this, but if you go to the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology or Medline you can look it up./p

Posted on: Mon, 06/26/2000 - 3:32am
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pOur oldest daughter had had some severe swelling of the lips and face after having one bite of (some kind of) peanuts in ice cream. (She immendiately spit it out.) It was a tub type ice cream in a mini market. If my wife had been there, it wouldn't have happened. Like a big dummy I let my guard down./p
pI didn't give her the epipen because her throat didn't close up and she could breath normally. Swelling was the only sympthom. We plan to use it if they can't breath. I believe my wife just gave her Benadryl while I was saying a prayer of thanks./p
pThis happened six years ago, but I will never let my guard down again. If people don't know what is in the food they offer, we pass it by./p

Posted on: Mon, 06/26/2000 - 6:05am
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Joined: 06/08/2000 - 09:00

pLike others here, we work on the assumption that our daughter's allergy is life threatening. The one reaction she had was hives all over her jaw, neck, and chest. She was too young to tell us if there were any internal symptoms that we couldn't see, so I don't know if her breathing was at all difficult. It may not be life-threatening, but why take chances?/p
pSarah/p

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