Homeschooling

Posted on: Sat, 07/01/2000 - 1:17am
barb1123's picture
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How many people choose to homeschool their PA child(ren)because they are afraid of exposure at school?

I took part in a debate yesterday at Parent's Place where I was told I was an irresponsible idiot for not wanting to homeschool my child. I was told that if peanuts were so much of a risk I shouldn't let them into public school. I was told a lot of other things (mostly nasty and vicious, but never mind.

So, I'm just wondering if this is an option many people choose or don't choose and why.

Also, I strongly urge you to check out the Peanut Ban debate thread at Parent's Place. I think you will be shocked at the hostility, bigotry and complete ignorance of a good number of people (like the ones who said they would send their kids to school with peanuts on purpose now if there was a child with a PA in the school). Please see my post below "Shocking Debate at Parent's Place". It has the links.

Posted on: Sat, 07/01/2000 - 6:56am
ihatepeanuts's picture
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pWe do homeschool. But, it is for so manybr /
reasons. I have two children, ages 7/p

Posted on: Sat, 07/01/2000 - 2:03pm
FromTheSouth's picture
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Joined: 03/01/2000 - 09:00

pYes, we homeschool because of my child's p.a. She becomes ill from just being around others who have been in contact with p.b. I also do not think ill of anyone with a p.a. child that sends them to school. If my child was not airborne allergic and did not have reactions from casual contact, she would probably go to school. Homeschool has worked well for us, also. This fall I will also h.s. our second child (K-5) mainly because she will barely be five by Sept. 1 and only all day Kinderg. is available, which I am against. Private school is also an alarming $3,000 a year. I see the benefits to both types of schooling but for us h.s. is best. As parents of p.a. children, we need to consider the severity of the allergy and whether you trust the school to handle it, not only from a medical stand point but emotional one as well. As parents we must decide what is best for our children. . . P.S. Don't let anyone tell you that h.s. children are lacking in social skills. Just sit down and have a talk with a h.s. family and listen to the activities they do (P.E. class, art class, spanish class, etc.). I make sure my child participates in such classes outside the home./p

Posted on: Sun, 07/02/2000 - 1:41am
mkruby's picture
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Joined: 05/01/2000 - 09:00

pBarb I am taking place in that debate too..I tried to calm it down, but to no avail. I don't homeschool nor did I ever think to..it never even crossed my mind, nor would I./p
pFor some, home-schooling is not an option. Both parents need to work and need the health insurance to deal with the cost of life threatening allergies and everything else that goes along with it./p
pI will say on that board though, I don't know who wrote it, but a child or parent bringing a pa food to school being compared to a murderer, or a loaded gun..I don't like that comparison because it causes sterotypes and prejudice, making an already lethal situation worse./p
pDid you read the one post by shmooty about the child that kids were bullying and smeared peanut butter all over and the kid almost died? The comparison of murder and guns etc., can cause that kind of hate in the school and doesn't get us anywhere, I believe. The above situation however, I would consider murder if the child died and I consider that also to be a felony act of attempted murder which the legal system should be involved, if it isn't already. If that were my kid, the school, the kids, the parents would all have a major lawsuit on their hands./p

Posted on: Mon, 07/03/2000 - 3:45am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

pCan you post the link to the parentsplace debate on peanut free schools? I've been unable to find the debate/postings on parentsplace. THANKS./p

Posted on: Mon, 07/03/2000 - 12:53pm
CarolynM's picture
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Joined: 03/27/2001 - 09:00

pBarb, you are not an irresponsible idiot! We have never considered home schooling, and have not had any problems at our public school. I have worked very hard to educate school personnel, and they have done a lot more than I have asked. They are very receptive. You have to do what works for you./p

Posted on: Fri, 10/27/2000 - 7:21am
Sue's picture
Sue
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Joined: 02/13/1999 - 09:00

pI am bringing this topic up because there are a lot of good questions on the topic of home schooling and I don't think everyone knows this topic is here./p
pOf course, you can post anywhere you like, but this thread helps keep some of the subject info together./p
pSue in Sunny Arizona/p
p[This message has been edited by Sue (edited October 27, 2000).]/p

Posted on: Fri, 10/27/2000 - 8:35am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

pMany years ago when my husband and I got married we decided to homeschool our children. We do not want our children being brought up in the public education system (I am not trying to put the public schools down since I went there myself) because of the things that my husband and I experienced during our HS years. We were both heavily into drugs, alcohol, and sex before we accepted Christ into our hearts. /p
pWe have never based our decision on our childs PA even though I am glad that we chose homeschooling so I don't have to fight the school systems right now./p
pThis decision has proven to be the right one for our family since my son is very bright and advanced for his age. If anyone wants more information about our decision please email me./p
pI think homeschooling is wonderful. Yes, it has its up and downs but it also is a blessing./p

Posted on: Fri, 10/27/2000 - 1:36pm
MattsMom's picture
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Joined: 09/17/2000 - 09:00

pditto, Naomi! We chose to homeschool long before our oldest was born. *I* knew I wanted to homeschool before that even, but hubby and I never discussed it until we found out we were pg. He agreed almost immediately that this is the way we should go. He knew he didn't want public schools, but had been worried about 'socialization'. Once I pointed out all the extracurricular activities (soccer, scouts, dance, 4H, etc) and all the 'field trips' out in public (stores, zoos, museums, libraries, etc) he realized that wasn't really an issue. /p
pI don't know that we would have chosen homeschooling based solely on PA, though. I tend to think we would NOT have. I can't say for certain, because we have never been in that position. We had already planned on homeschooling. /p
pWe've only just 'gotten it' when it comes to PA (thanks peanutallergy.com!!), and so this may change, but right now, we are trying very hard to not allow PA to 'rule our lives totally', ya know? What I mean is, we're trying to keep the changes in our lives as minimal as is safely possible. If Matt were airborne sensitive (and we haven't seen any evidence that he is, that we were aware of), the changes we are making would be much more severe, I'm sure. So maybe had we NOT been planning on homeschooling originally, and found out Matt was airborne sensitive, maybe we would have opted for homeschooling then. I just don't know. /p
pThe whole key, though, is that each family/situation is very, very different. So how each family deals with PA, and how each family deals with education, is going to be very different. You have to do what is right and best for you./p
pI hope this post made some sort of sense. lol I oftentimes have difficulties getting my point across clearly. =(/p

Posted on: Thu, 11/02/2000 - 10:54pm
no nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/24/2000 - 09:00

pI am homeschooling my almost 5 year old daughter. I started exploring this option over a year ago due in part to PA. The more I learned about HS the more it felt like the right choice for our family. PA is only one of MANY reasons. It is a HUGE decision tho, and certainly not for everyone. But it is a valid, viable, enriching alternative. We belong to 2 HS groups and get together 3 times a month. I definately recommend that, very empowering and supportive. My daughter also takes a dance class and swim class. a lot of people are concerned with social aspects but Im fairly confident that won't be a problem. There are many hundreds of thousands of HS, you're bound to connect with some. And with the library, park, friends, extra classes, life, etc, she's social enough!/p

Posted on: Wed, 07/18/2001 - 12:47am
nkepe's picture
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Joined: 06/18/2001 - 09:00

pMy family is basically home-schooling. I decided on home-schooling many years ago before I even met my husband. This was a part of our talks while dating. He was opening to trying. We began home-schooling our PA daughter when she was 5, but she was not a diagnosed PA child then. Our decision had to do with our faith, not PA./p
pHaving said that, we were forced into the situation of sending our two daughters to public school for the 2000-2001 school term. We had just returned to Canada from six years in South Africa and had to both work as part of the adjustment stage. While there were many things that we were very unhappy about, the school's handling of Kwanita's allergy was not one (for the most part). This was mostly due to the fact that she was not yet diagnosed (we only suspected) and that she had a PA teacher. /p
pWe finally got into an appointment with an allergist in June and she was diagnosed then. I was still pretty happy with the school until I discovered that they lost her epi-pen!/p
pAll that said, home-schooling works for us. We are returning to it, but we did not consider her PA as a reason even then. Things with the school system really trouble me, but if it were necessary, I would be willing to work with her school and teachers to do whatever I can to safeguard her./p
pThe choice is up to you as a family. No-one else need concern themselves with your decisions. You do what you need to do that allows you to have peace each day and then you stand firm in your choice./p
pHope this is helpful. Natalie./p

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