Anaphylaxis?

Posted on: Wed, 07/05/2000 - 5:47am
latymom's picture
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Joined: 05/21/2000 - 09:00

For those of you who have had anaphylactic rections, what were your symptoms exactly? What do you consider anaphylaxis? Is hives+vomiting anaphylaxis? A tight throat? What exactly?

Posted on: Wed, 07/05/2000 - 6:35am
Yankee's picture
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Joined: 03/08/2000 - 09:00

pI have read on this page that anaphylaxis involves two of your body's systems reacting at once. I'm not sure of the actual definition, but I can explain what happened to me. First I had severe stomach pains, to the point where I was doubled over. I could not decide if I had to vomit or go to the bathroom. I ended up doing neither. My entire body swelled and became very itchy. I was scratching myself all over, like a dog. Then my throat began to close. I was wheezing and could barely get a breath. Luckily, my mother had some benadryl on hand, and that brought the symptoms down (It was my first reaction, and I did not yet have an epi-pen). Hope that helps./p

Posted on: Thu, 07/06/2000 - 8:42am
Susan K's picture
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Joined: 08/13/1999 - 09:00

pmy pa son had an anaphylaxic reaction to milk at 2 years old. He immediately had severe and violent vomiting and huge hives on his face, neck, torso and back. He was not verbal but I could tell by body language that his throat and mouth felt funny. The epi-pen reversed the reaction immediately. Anaphylaxis doesn't always include breathing problems, but I have no doubt we would have dealt with that I had waited to use the pen./p

Posted on: Thu, 07/06/2000 - 9:26am
DMB's picture
DMB
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Joined: 02/22/2001 - 09:00

pMy son had his anaphylactic reaction to peanuts at 18 mos. He had uncontrollable coughing and sneezing. He had hives all over his face and body. His eyes were almost swollen shut and his lips were also swollen. He was drooling because even his tongue was swollen. We hadn't been to the allergist yet so we didn't have the epi. We gave him benadryl and took him to the er where the doctor there gave him a shot of epinephrine. Deanna/p

Posted on: Thu, 07/06/2000 - 10:15am
barb1123's picture
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Joined: 04/08/2000 - 09:00

pWhile we haven't suffered anaphylactic shock (thank the powers that be) our DS has anaphylactic allergies to dairy, eggs, wheat as well as peanuts. We asked him how we would know if DS was having an anaphylactic reaction. He said, follow the ABCs:/p
pAirway (is the airway constricting?)br /
Breathing (is breathing labored, wheezing, short. etc.?)br /
Circulation [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]has circulation lowered dramatically, i.e. shock)/p
pIf all of the above, then you have anaphylactic shock and must administer EpiPen and call 999 (that's the 911 in Ireland) immediately. BUT you know what? Ambulance drivers in Ireland can't administer adrenaline. How scary is that?/p

Posted on: Fri, 07/07/2000 - 10:24am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

pyou know it is funny...I NEVER knew that the vomiting and the stomach association was part of a peanut allergy. I have never experienced anything below the throat with an attack. Interesting to learn how we are all different.br /
My reaction....my biggest and usual anaphalaxis are the throat and mouth swelling shut.br /
They started with hives everywhere, and moved quickly....face swelled, and what works in an emergency situation is sticking a straw in the mouth and down the throat to help keep a little bit of an airway open.br /
Didn't mean for that to sound crude....but sometimes, in the time for an ambulance to arrive....that is what 911 advised me to do.br /
Low blood pressure also occurs.br /
But....there is also the panic attack that goes with it....especially after you have experienced one.br /
God keep us all safe!/p

Posted on: Wed, 07/19/2000 - 7:37pm
psomerville's picture
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Joined: 07/17/2000 - 09:00

pI don't understand why all ambulance officers aren't allowed to administer adrenalin. In Australia it varies between states. Queensland ambulances don't always have adrenalin on hand. In New South Wales (where I live) only a level 4 or 5 ambulance officer can administer adrenalin. I am sure we all have been told that it is safer to use adrenalin than not to use it in an emergency.br /
This needs to be changed. Don't you agree?br /
Denise/p

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 12:04pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I'm glad you have found a physician that you are comfortable working with. That is very important.
Look on the bright side, too-- many people who suffer the grief of a fatal reaction were the ones who didn't know it [i]could[/i] happen to them, so you are way ahead of the game now. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Quote:
I was wondering are their people that are prone to anaphylaxis? Or does it depend on the severity of the allergy? Could the same person have the same ammount of peanuts one day and have an anaphylaxis response and the next day not? What are the contributing factors if anything?
Well, yes, yes, yes, and ummmm, anything that has an effect on your immune system in any way is a "factor." (Make sense? No? LOL!)
Seriously, this is very confusing stuff, and you have asked some really great questions. I'll do my best to answer them (as I understand it).
Anaphylaxis is evidently a certain kind of innate "ability" if you will. Like perfect pitch. (don't thank me-- I got this quote from Marianne Barber's book.. I just [i]love[/i] it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) So a Hx of anaphylaxis means you are ALWAYS at risk for anaphylaxing from any major allergic event.
Next in line? Well..... there are some allergies that are "special" that way. Peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, and insect venoms tend to be that sort. Anyone with an allergy to one of those is at risk. Period. But there are certainly people with those allergies who go a lifetime with only "minor" reactions. Some of this is probably just luck, though, because...
Peanut is especially problematic due to its total unpredictability. There is virtually no dose-response for some people with the allergy-- so your guess is correct. A tolerated exposure today could kill tomorrow. No rhyme or reason to it, really.
We just look at this as "Sometimes you get lucky. Mostly not."
Other factors? Illness, pollen/dust/animal issues, stress, lack of sleep, phase of moon, wind speed and direction, tea stocks in SE Asia.... I could go on. But you get the picture. There are often contributing factors that you can identify in analyzing a major reaction... but predicting beforehand? Impossible.
Does this help? I hope so. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 12:04pm
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

I'm glad you have found a physician that you are comfortable working with. That is very important.
Look on the bright side, too-- many people who suffer the grief of a fatal reaction were the ones who didn't know it [i]could[/i] happen to them, so you are way ahead of the game now. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Quote:
I was wondering are their people that are prone to anaphylaxis? Or does it depend on the severity of the allergy? Could the same person have the same ammount of peanuts one day and have an anaphylaxis response and the next day not? What are the contributing factors if anything?
Well, yes, yes, yes, and ummmm, anything that has an effect on your immune system in any way is a "factor." (Make sense? No? LOL!)
Seriously, this is very confusing stuff, and you have asked some really great questions. I'll do my best to answer them (as I understand it).
Anaphylaxis is evidently a certain kind of innate "ability" if you will. Like perfect pitch. (don't thank me-- I got this quote from Marianne Barber's book.. I just [i]love[/i] it [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] ) So a Hx of anaphylaxis means you are ALWAYS at risk for anaphylaxing from any major allergic event.
Next in line? Well..... there are some allergies that are "special" that way. Peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish, and insect venoms tend to be that sort. Anyone with an allergy to one of those is at risk. Period. But there are certainly people with those allergies who go a lifetime with only "minor" reactions. Some of this is probably just luck, though, because...
Peanut is especially problematic due to its total unpredictability. There is virtually no dose-response for some people with the allergy-- so your guess is correct. A tolerated exposure today could kill tomorrow. No rhyme or reason to it, really.
We just look at this as "Sometimes you get lucky. Mostly not."
Other factors? Illness, pollen/dust/animal issues, stress, lack of sleep, phase of moon, wind speed and direction, tea stocks in SE Asia.... I could go on. But you get the picture. There are often contributing factors that you can identify in analyzing a major reaction... but predicting beforehand? Impossible.
Does this help? I hope so. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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