help please

Posted on: Mon, 09/19/2005 - 1:50pm
jaleonar63's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/19/2005 - 09:00

daughter has been tested and told of many allergies, peanuts being one, have never let her near them, but this is what happened

sept 13th 5.10am, screams for me, run in having asthma attack and cant breathe, has a fit wets her self, out cold no breathing, no heart beat, ring ambo, husband starts cpr, I freeze, daughter 15 takes over cpr and does it proper. put nebulizer mask over her face in between, still not breathing she is grey and lifeless, cant find heart beat, keep trying cpr and mask, 10 min pass, ambo gets hear just as other daughter gets her to take a breath. This was not a asthma attack she came right with in a few hrs and she doesnt come right after attack for days When she come round she said her throat was closed over, could this have been a food allergy from 10.30 pm the night before. Desert package says it may contain traces of nuts.????????? lots of questions have no answers, had cat scan, xray and bloods and not problems there. She is to scared to sleep and so are her tired parents.
regards
jennifer

Posted on: Thu, 01/07/2016 - 2:39am
mom1995's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/09/2004 - 09:00

I can offer our experience and know that no two are the same. Our daughter had a reaction (nearly fatal) at 19 months, skin test at 4yrs which required two epi shots to counter her reaction to the peanut. At that time she showed a reaction to soy as well. As time has passed (she's 20 now) she can not eat foods too often with too much soy as it makes her sick. Not a reaction but more rather she can not process it and she gets a huge blotted tummy followed by a day in the restroom. After puberty (per dr recommendations ) we did the blood test for all nuts. On their 1-5 scale she is unmeasurable for peanuts (5++++) and a 4 or 3 for every other nut they had to test for. I am no doctor only a mom that reads and has tried to ensure her safety it is my opinion that while peanuts are a legume it is the protein issue that seems to link the allergy. And if you look at what has been modified that has some part I am sure. Soy was never intended for human consumption. We have had forced upon us with even knowing that's what was going on.
She is in college now and works and self regulates. She knows to listen to her body and to follow that instinct that says something is wrong.
Hope this helps.

Posted on: Thu, 01/07/2016 - 4:01am
Acarli96's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2016 - 11:42

So is your daughter able to eat other legumes such as beans/peas? Mine has never reacted to them only a nutter butter cookie at 2 which prompted tested. She was off chart for peanuts, cashew, and 4+ for almonds. My daughter seems to only get soy if it's an added ingredient to processed foods as I can't always fix snacks for school from scratch. I don't recall them testing soy...I'm still waiting on return call from her doc.

Posted on: Thu, 01/07/2016 - 7:48am
mom1995's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/09/2004 - 09:00

So yes. She only avoids nuts, soy and sesame. She eats beans and loves peas. Never had any issue with any of them.
Hope that helps.

Posted on: Sat, 01/30/2016 - 11:59am
PeanutAllergy.com's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/21/2013 - 11:03

Question of the Week: Answered!
Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.
Our Answer:
Thank you for your question. It is important to understand the results of your child’s allergy test and act accordingly.
Firstly, it could be useful to get a second opinion about your child’s allergies. Getting tests done can be one of the most accurate ways to know what allergens to avoid.
Secondly, it’s important you can keep an eye on your child’s reactions to food. Some allergic reactions aren’t as obvious as others. Symptoms could include vomiting or anaphylaxis but also skin rashes or hives on the body. It might be a good idea to keep a food journal and see when your child gets symptoms or feels irritated by a certain food. You can learn more about food allergy symptoms in kids here.
According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, people who are allergic to peanuts may also be allergic to soy, peas or some kinds of beans. This might explain why your doctor recommended that your daughter avoid them. In addition, allergies can also develop during the teen and adult years. You can see more information on this topic here.
In addition, a study found that only about five percent of kids with peanut allergy experience allergic reactions to other legumes tested. To learn more about the likelihood of children with peanut allergy being allergic to chickpeas, click here.
It’s important to know what to do in case your child does have an allergic reaction. Once you administer epinephrine, call 911 immediately. If she is nauseated, she should be laid on her side to avoid any choking on vomit. Even while this is a stressful situation, try to remain calm so that your child will feel more secure. You can read other tips for dealing with an allergic reaction here.
We also reached out to our Facebook community with your question, and you can see their responses here.
We hope this information helps. Take care!

Posted on: Sun, 01/31/2016 - 3:50am
vinucube's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/12/2014 - 11:21

Avoidance can make the allergy worse. So it is a difficult fine line you have to walk. Consuming minute quantities of the allergen can build tolerance.
http://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2431-13-203
https://www.niaid.nih.gov/topics/foodAllergy/research/Pages/bakedMilk.aspx
"Although avoidance might have a role in relation to pollens and indoor allergens, it is now clear that avoiding oral exposure is the wrong strategy for foods."
http://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(15)00584-9/fulltext
Refined peanut oil is safe for most people with peanut allergy. It might help build tolerance.

Posted on: Sun, 01/31/2016 - 6:58am
jap's picture
jap
Offline
Joined: 08/11/2013 - 08:33

My Daughter is 700 X more allergic to peanut than she should be on the peanut component panel test
She is allergic to peas and lentils and soy, most people who are allergic to lentils are also allergic to soy.
easy to avoid peas and lentils
As for soy most people allergic to soy can eat soy oil and soy lecithin , so just avoid soy protein which rarely in items un like lecithin and oil which will limit you beyond belief
Julian

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 10:52am
Comments: 2
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 01/14/2020 - 1:03pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by penelope Sun, 12/29/2019 - 6:21pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by sunshinestate Sun, 12/29/2019 - 6:00pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by Italia38 Sun, 12/29/2019 - 5:44pm
Comments: 5
Latest Post by justme Tue, 12/17/2019 - 3:41pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by justme Tue, 12/17/2019 - 2:39pm
Comments: 45

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

What can you eat if you can't eat peanut butter? Fortunately for people with a peanut allergy, there...

If you’ve recently discovered a peanut allergy in your family, you may be wondering what on earth you are going to replace those peanut butter and...

If you find frequent allergy-related food recalls upsetting you are not alone, but a new federal rule may help reduce the cross-contamination...

Recent UK studies revealing the benefit of giving peanut protein to infants at risk for peanut allergy have left some mothers feeling guilty. The...

Peanuts are classified as legumes, as are chickpeas. Does this mean a child with a peanut allergy needs to avoid eating chickpeas? As with many...

Parents of kids with peanut allergy and adults with a peanut allergy may worry about allergen exposure from surfaces not cleaned after peanut...

A 504 plan* documents food allergy accommodations agreed to by parents and their child’s school. Plans are typically created during a 504 meeting...

It may seem a contradiction when doctors claim reactions owed to airborne peanut protein are rare, yet you read multiple online stories of kids...

Nearly 25 percent of children with a peanut allergy will outgrow it. However, there is a small risk...

If you or your child has a peanut allergy, that unmistakable smell of peanuts wafting through the air...

If you have a peanut allergy, you are probably accustomed to reading labels and scanning for warnings...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

Only those who have peanut allergies really seem to realize how many things can and often do have...

Childhood allergies can affect sleep, eating habits, concentration level, and mood. Children with allergies can exhibit behaviors that reveal...

Health Canada’s new food labeling regulations, which came into force August of this year, have made it easier for people with food allergies to...

A school prank could have gone terribly wrong had the girl being pranked not been diligent about her allergies. The Washington state teenager is...

Although allergies affect many people worldwide, there are currently no universal allergy symbols. It is estimated that about 25 percent of...

George Washington Carver found more than 300 uses for peanuts and peanut oil. That’s more than 300 ways people with an allergy to peanuts can be...

In the United States, millions of people suffer from acid reflux, a painful condition in the throat and esophagus that results when stomach acid...

Peanuts cause more severe food allergic reactions than other foods, followed by shellfish, fish, tree nuts and eggs. Although there is only a...