Can Blood Transplants Give or Take Away Deadly Peanut Allergy?

Posted on: Sat, 09/05/2015 - 12:05pm
Allergy Sufferer's picture
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Joined: 11/09/2014 - 16:01

So I have been deadly allergic to peanuts since I was 7 years old. I actually grew up eating peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. Then one day I overreacted to a sausage from Denny's that had peanut filling "to make it look thicker".

When I was 19 I was in a terrible collision. It broke nine of my ribs... you get the idea. I went to the hospital and they had to give me a blood transplant. Now I can hardly remember this because of the medication, but supposedly, in my next destination I was given a candy that I said, "Hey dad, this tastes like peanut butter."

This place was not the hospital, it was a retirement home. I was there for therapy, I know it's weird and unconventional. Small towns are the worse for helpfulness. Anyway, my dad had me spit it out and I guess I instantly forgot. I was lying in bed. I don't think I so much as attempted to rinse my mouth. Hours went by and no bodily overreaction.

So now I'm wondering if a blood transplant can cause someone to no longer have an allergy? Can it give someone an allergy? Or is it possible that pain medications prevent allergic reactions? Did I not react because I didn't swallow the candy? I've been lost and confused when I think about this event. I thought I would ask for expert advice.

Posted on: Wed, 09/16/2015 - 3:03am
stratmom's picture
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Joined: 02/27/2002 - 09:00

First, it's called a blood tranfusion (not transplant). Secondly, you could contact the hospital to see what medications you were on. They should have a record of your treatment and the medications that were given to you. The place you went next was likely a rehab facility (not a retirement home). They should also have records of your treatment and possibly also what sort of food you were given.
If you want to know for sure whether you are still allergic to peanuts, you should go to an allergist and get a pinprick test on your back. While you are at it, get tested for soy and tree nuts as well.
They say that about 20% of people will outgrow a peanut allergy. Unfortunately, my kids (who are now young adults) are still allergic. The only way to tell whether you are still allergic or not is to get tested by an allergist.

Posted on: Wed, 09/16/2015 - 3:23am
Allergy Sufferer's picture
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Joined: 11/09/2014 - 16:01

However unlikely it actually was a retirement home.
Thanks, overly corrective mom.

Posted on: Sat, 03/12/2016 - 10:03am
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Joined: 06/21/2013 - 11:03

Question of the Week: Answered!
Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.
Our Answer:
Thank you for your question. It is important to understand your allergy and its severity.
First off, we recommend speaking to a doctor about your situation. If you’ve never had any actual tests done, he/she might recommend doing so now so you can have concrete details on how your body responds to certain allergens.
It’s rare that someone could develop a food allergy due to a blood transfusion. There was a case of an eight-year-old Canadian boy who developed food allergies after a blood transfusion from someone with food allergies. However, in most of these cases, the allergies are expect to be temporary. And again, they are very rare. You can read more about this possibility here.
It’s also possible to grow out of a food allergy that is developed in childhood. Approximately one quarter of children with a food allergy will outgrow it. And the earlier a child has a reaction, the higher the chance they might do so. However, this is still a case by case basis. Again, if you haven’t been tested for allergies officially, it’s a good idea to do so now and discuss the idea of having grown out of allergies with your doctor. You can read more about outgrowing allergies here.
It’s also important to pay attention to your symptoms and avoid any possible allergens. Know the proper way to use an auto-injector and review that information once in a while (and encourage anyone close to you to do so as well). You can learn more about using an auto-injector here.
We also reached out to our Facebook community with your question, and you can see their responses here.
We hope this information helps. Take care!

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