23 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 4:17am
Nutsnonuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/20/2013 - 10:56

I

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 5:08am
laurelg1's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/14/2013 - 15:19

I just want you to know, I did not state that I did not inform teachers, nor that I wasn't allowed to. As the nurse, I drive my staff so crazy with training and updates about allergies and health issues they could teach a course in anaphylaxis. I recommend parents make contact with their child's teacher about his/her needs and those issues specific to him. Our school encourages an open line of communication between parents and staff about any issue, medical, educational and personal.

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 9:43am
firthfamily's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/13/2013 - 11:38

I am sorry that your son doesn't feel safe at school. It is really sad when the main focus of school is food and not learning. My daughter wasn't safe at her school either. I had talked with the principal and because it is a private school they are not required to make a 504 plan. So we ended up changing schools. We now have our peanut free table and even with out a 504 plan the parents of her class have told me that they will not have class projects that have peanuts in them. I am realistic, I know that some will slip through though. But it will only be products that are made in a facility and not contain any overt nuts. She knows though to only eat food if I brought it in though. So it isn't a perfect solution but at least it is a better one.
Ironically the same day that I had talked to the principal about getting a nut free table set up, I had a parent complaining to me that one of her daughters friends wasn't being to friendly. I looked over to her and it was all I could do to not say, I wish I had your problems want to switch for even one day. In my years as nurse I have learned many things from my patients- this one keeps coming up. Nothing really happens, until it happens to you.
So is there another school option that you could look into? Sometimes it is just easier if you aren't the first one. It was hard for my daughter to leave her friends but she feels safer now. Quite frankly that nurse scares me and I am a nurse. I would talk with her and find out if she has ever had anyone have a nut reaction in her care and if she was able to treat them correctly until help arrived. Trust your gut. Even with the 504 plan is he going to have help if he needs it.

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:00am
LMT480's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/23/2013 - 23:45

While a 504 plan is absolutely essential, it isn't always the complete answer. The staff has to follow it, but it doesn't help their attitude, especially if they don't "get it." I had to pave the way at my daughter's elementary school 9 years ago and it wasn't easy, but at least everyone was open to learn. It sounds to me like you need to change schools if at all possible. If the nurse isn't on your side you are going to be fighting an uphill battle.
They didn't have room for a peanut free table in the very small cafeteria will very long tables, but they placed a small table right outside the doors. At first I thought it would be horrible for her, but it turned out to be a highlight of her day. In the beginning of the year they sent home letters to the kids in her class asking if they wanted to sign up to be lunch buddy of the day. If they agreed then a calendar was made at the beginning of each month assigning them as a buddy. They got to be line leader that day and some other special priviledges. They had to bring a peanut free lunch that was inspected by the nurse, and then they got to sit with my daughter at the special table for that lunch. It was near the principals office so she always managed to stop and say hi. The kids all thought it was such a treat. As for the classroom, that was peanut free, but I kept a box of her special treats filled so she always had something really fun to eat in case of a party. She didn't eat anything brought in by anyone, unless it was cleared by me first. It was a learning experience for the school as well as for me, but we were all always on the same page.

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 11:40am
pamela hughes's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/11/2013 - 10:01

Wow - I am so sorry. Your son's school clearly does not understand or is not compassionate toward his PA. I have had to pave the way at Preschool, Elementary and now are working with a new elementary too. They have been wonderful, but there is no fail safe - so I really empathize with the response you are getting. It's hard enough when they have a wonderful attitude and things still pop up. I have 2 recommendations to consider:
* Having a brief meeting with facts about PA and a Q&A time in case they really aren't clear on the severity. I would be sure your biggest advocate teachers are at that meeting - it is crucial. It's amazing how people influence each other.
* If that is not successful, I would look into other schooling options.
That may sound extreme, but I have found the worst trap for me mentally is when I feel like there is no hope or no option. Sometimes just looking at all your possibilities can give you renewed hope and new ideas. It may also encourage your son as you go through this time together.
Hang in there and make friends with as many sweet people who understand as you can. They not only encourage you, they may be the "other voices" that talk sense into the powers that be. And remember you are doing a great job protecting your child as you let him live life well. Not everyone will agree-but you can know you're doing your job. :)

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 5:19pm
headfirstfearless's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/01/2013 - 18:06

Okay, I may be playing devil's advocate here and I don't want to come off as insensitive because that is definitely NOT where I am coming from. I am just speaking from my own experience and want to give you what I consider reality. I am 24 and have had a severe, life-threatening allergy to peanuts since the age of 2. I have carried two Epi-Pens for as long as I can remember and learned to read at a very young age for the sole reason of being able to read ingredient labels on my own. When I started school, nearly twenty years ago, the schools had no idea about peanut allergies or how to handle them yet. No one understood that I could still have a reaction via other ways of contact and not just by eating peanuts. Few had heard of Epi-Pens. My mom did a great deal of education with the school nurse, principal, and my teachers, just as you have. Schools do have an obligation to provide a SAFE environment for all of the children they serve. Your son's school is clearly not doing an adequate job of accomplishing this for your son and it does need to be addressed. However, at some point, you and your son will need to figure out how he is going to handle his peanut allergies out in the real world. Colleges, universities, and workplaces have very little control over their environments and in most cases, cannot and/or will not accommodate allergies. This can present a huge challenge on a daily basis (believe me, I know!) but it's reality. Unfortunately, the world cannot accommodate peanuts allergies. It sounds like your son is already hyper-vigilant, which will of course help him as he gets older and enters new environments and encounters new experiences. Best of luck...

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 8:00pm
Mrsdocrse's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2007 - 09:00

I couldn't agree more. Well said. That is the reality.... this is not a peanut free world. Everywhere we go, there is a risk... grocery store, amusement parks, malls, etc. It is what it is. I tell my son now that he is older is that HE needs to take care of himself.... Control what you can control and make sure you wash your hands often and never go anywhere without your Epi-pen.

Posted on: Sun, 10/20/2013 - 10:49pm
joshmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/28/2000 - 09:00

I am really sorry that your son is going through this. Some people can be really insensitive. My son is 22 years old, and we discovered he was allergic to peanuts when he was 3 years old.
A lot of people don't understand the seriousness of peanut allergies, and will be very non-chalant about it. The school that he attended for early childhood, was well educated and the made sure that his classroom was a peanut-free classroom. I had him repeat kindergarten. For 3 years he attended a private school. I had a good repore with the teachers and Head of School, and was able to educate them on the seriousness of PA. If someone brought PB&J to school, his teacher would let him eat in the classroom, and she and another child would eat with him so that he wouldn't be alone. In 3rd grade I registered him back in public school. I wrote a letter to the school board, cc'd the principal and his teacher. The principal thanked me for sending the letter, and she said that she had no idea how serious it was. Another teacher who was the lunchroom teacher told us that although my son asked to be moved whenever someone at his table ate PB&J, she did not know it was that serious. The Principal told her that since my son had a very good behavior, she wouldn't see any reason for him to lie about it. The lunchroom teacher said that sometimes he would go and sit at a table alone, because she noticed that he would get sick from the smell(wheezing). The school nurse suggested that he not be in the cafeteria at all when children are eating PB&J or anything containg PB.

Posted on: Mon, 10/21/2013 - 11:02am
jap's picture
jap
Offline
Joined: 08/11/2013 - 08:33

WILL BE QUICK
JUST WALKED IN THE DOOR
AN ALLERGY CHILD FALLS UNDER A 504 DISABILITY PLAN
A CARE PLAN MUST BE IN ACTION BY THE SCHOOL, PEANUT FREE TABLE REQUIRED WITH BUFFER TABLES
NO PEANUT PRODUCT SHOULD BE IN HIS PLACE OF LEARNING IE CLASSROOM , EVEN IF SCHOOL IS NOT PEANUT FREE. ESPECIALLY HE SHOULD NOT HAVE TO LEAVE CLASSROOM AND 2 EXPOSURES IS VERY DANGEROUS AND SHOWS A LACK OF CARE.YOUR CHILD SHOULD NOT MISS OUT DUE TO ILNESS, DO THEY BAN THE CHILDREN IN WHEEL CHAIRS ??????
GO TO YOUR DOCTOR GET AN ORDER FOR SECOND EPI PEN TO BE GIVEN AFTER 5 MINUTES WHICH IS WHAT THE EPI SITE RECOMMENDS, REMEMBER THE GIRL AT CAMP WHO DIED HAD THREE GIVEN
MY DAUGHTERS PLAN ALSO BANS PEANUT FROM HER CLASSROOM AND NO TEACHERS ARE ALLOWED TO OFFER HER FOOD OR EAT PEANUT IN CLASSROOM
IF SHE INGESTS A PEANUT SHE IS NOT MOVED FROM CLASSROOM EPI GIVEN + BENADRYL AND VENTOLIN THEN 911 5 MINUTES LATER ANOTHER EPI AND SHE IS NEVER LEFT ALONE.
SOUNDS LIKE YOUR SCHOOL SYSTEM IS CLUELESS, MAKE THEM WORK FOR YOU, DRAW UP THE PLAN WITH A DOCTOR MY DAUGHTER IS 15.5 AND NEVER HAD A PEANUT EXPOSURE IN 14 YEARS
JULIAN

Posted on: Mon, 10/21/2013 - 11:56am
stressedmommy's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/16/2006 - 09:00

Let me first say that I am so sorry that you and your son are having to deal with this.
As someone has mentioned, a 504 would cover his peanut allergies. It sounds like you have done a great job of teaching your son about his allergies.
With that said. Our son has had multiple severe food allergies since he was about 20 months old. We attempted to place him in a public middle school 3 years ago (he is now 14). After meeting with the principle who told us he could not have his epi with him (but it could stay two buildings away at the office) and he needed to "learn to deal" with peanuts when I inquired about talking to the art teacher about not using peanut products in art (yes this has been a problem in the past). I asked about allergy free tables and was informed they did not do this. After about 30 minutes, he told me "In my 30+ years of being a school principle you are the first parent to ask for special accommodations for an allergic child.." because I wanted my son to continue keeping his epi pen ON HIM as he had for as long as he could remember. My son cried for days. He was terrified because this man just did not seem to "get" it.
We put him in a charter school the next town over which was much more understanding and educated about allergies (all the teachers were trained in epi pens, no food of any kind in the classrooms, etc).
Yes, I could have pushed for accommodations, but I felt my son's allergies were too severe to chance exposure.
It is always a constant battle to teach educators about his allergies. As I said he is now 14 and this year HE did the demonstration class we do EVERY year with ALL his teachers on how to use an epi pen (and now an auvi-q). And he just returned for a 4 night trip with his class...all chaperons (no parents allowed) were trained on the auvi-q and were very supportive of his special needs...no nuts or peanuts on the bus or in the rooms. So, some schools are more willing to work with you.
Best of luck on whatever you decide to do.

Pages

Peanut Free Store

More Community Posts

Latest Post by Italia38 Fri, 12/13/2019 - 4:55pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by absfabs Wed, 12/04/2019 - 12:29pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by absfabs Wed, 12/04/2019 - 12:25pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by absfabs Wed, 12/04/2019 - 12:22pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 12/03/2019 - 4:46pm
Comments: 9
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 12/03/2019 - 4:43pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by sunshinestate Mon, 12/02/2019 - 2:34pm
Comments: 5
Latest Post by absfabs Mon, 12/02/2019 - 11:17am
Comments: 482
Latest Post by Italia38 Fri, 11/29/2019 - 1:38pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 11/26/2019 - 4:31pm
Comments: 7
Latest Post by sunshinestate Thu, 11/21/2019 - 10:31am
Comments: 172
Latest Post by william robenstein Mon, 11/18/2019 - 10:35am
Comments: 1
Latest Post by sunshinestate Sun, 11/17/2019 - 1:16pm
Comments: 3

More Articles

When love is in the air we can get caught up in the moment and throw caution to the wind. However, if you have a...

Dogs have some things in common with humans when it comes to their health. They can have a wide range of allergies, just as humans can develop....

You already know that if you or your child has a peanut allergy you need to avoid peanut butter. Some...

So many wonderful recipes call for peanut butter. These recipes can still be enjoyed by experimenting with peanut butter replacements.

...

Are you craving sweets? Those with peanut allergies must be especially careful when indulging their...

For those with peanut allergies, baked goods present a serious risk. Many baked goods do not appear to contain peanuts, yet were baked in a...

Those who have peanut allergies know to avoid peanut butter cookies, of course – but what about other...

For anyone who has had a peanut allergy diagnosis, it is necessary to avoid eating peanuts entirely. However,...

Are you looking for peanut-free candies as a special treat for a child with...

Do you know what's in the face paint often used for Halloween costumes, school carnivals, and other events? If you're worried about smearing...

Vegetable oil is healthy before it is hydrogenated and a process that requires adding hydrogen to unsaturated fats. Oils that are often...

Peanut allergies don’t begin to cause problems for people the first time they are exposed to peanuts. Rather, the immune system first develops...

Anxious food allergic kids, understandably concerned about avoiding allergens, can become so restrictive in their food choices that weight loss...

The relationship between anxiety and food or other allergy is a complicated and puzzling one. Research has shown that stress can exacerbate...

Welcome to PeanutAllergy.com. Before you begin you must verify your email address. Please check your email and click on the link and you will...

If you have a food allergy, you will probably need to make some changes to your diet...

Just 30 seconds of mindfulness, of quieting our thoughts by being attentive to the present moment, can help manage stress and anxiety.

The...

Those affected by peanut allergy might have heard about basophil activation tests (BATs), a potentially accurate tool for diagnosing food allergy...

When your child has a food allergy, you want to make sure they are safe in school...

It’s the time of year when holiday parties, and family gatherings can make allergen avoidance more problematic. Whether you celebrate Christmas,...