My son is reacting right now

Posted on: Fri, 10/30/2009 - 8:07am
dwk4's picture
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Joined: 10/30/2009 - 14:48

My 9 year old son had a Halloween party at school and it appears one of the parents brought in cookies w/ Reeses Pieces, which my son ate. He didn't recognize them as peanuts. Three hours later, he has finally stopped throwing up and having GI issues. Luckily, he presents only mild respiratory constriction. The doctor said the reaction shouldn't get worse, but watch him, give 30 mg Benadryl by mouth 1x / 6 hrs. We didn't need Epi. I know it's our (and ultimately his) responsibility to avoid peanuts, but I can't help feeling a little frustrated. I guess it is too much to ask the school to consider a peanut free policy. I'm sure the mom who brought them in had the best of intentions, but I guess she didn't get the memo about a peanut allergy in class.

Posted on: Thu, 11/05/2009 - 11:53pm
Ashley5473's picture
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Joined: 03/24/2009 - 20:24

That is really unfortunate. I'm sure that she had the best intentions, too, but really. Somebody should be being more careful. If they aren't going to have a pn free policy, they should at least be watching extremely carefully. :-( I'm so glad that he was okay ultimately....

Posted on: Fri, 11/06/2009 - 12:08am
Food Allergy Assistant's picture
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Joined: 03/04/2009 - 07:15

What a scary story!
I think many people who don't deal with peanut allergies every day, just don't get it. I can see a parent not even thinking "peanut", when adding Reese's Pieces® to the cookies. I agree that she probably had the best of intentions.
We all need to keep educating others. I'm so glad your son is going to be okay.

Posted on: Sun, 11/08/2009 - 2:07am
BestAllergySites's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2009 - 21:46

Wow, I'm so glad to hear that you son is okay. These types of reactions are really scary and are certainly preventable.
I don't think it's too late to ask for some peanut restrictions. Since your son ate something and had a reaction-all the more reason to have restrictions put in place. I can at least share what we do/have for accommodations for my 6 yr old son.
1. classroom is peanut free (in fact free of all his allergens): classrooms are where our kids are immersed and should be safe for them. If this was a classroom party-the peanut free classroom would have prevented these cookies from being brought in.
2. Foods brought in for parties need to be packaged, labeled and free from my sons allergens.
3. Foods are discouraged for birthdays.
All allergies are different. I'm glad your sons reaction did not progress-but I wanted to mention that peanut allergy can progress quickly and can become quite severe. Our plan from our allergist states that if there is known ingestion or suspected ingestion our son should get the epi pen regardless of symptoms. Something to keep in mind.
If you need help with getting school accommodations feel free to ask or visit my website http://www.bestallergysites.com/ There is a school resource section that covers how to get accommodations in schools.

Posted on: Sat, 11/14/2009 - 12:11am
lakeswimr's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2007 - 09:00

I'm very sorry that happened. Do you have an allergist or are you working with a ped because your child absolutely should have received the epi. There are some varying views on when to give the epi but the situation you described would have received the epi on all food allergy emergency plans written by board certified allergists. I recommend you fire that allergist and get a new one asap because your child could DIE if you don't give the epi. You were LUCKY this time. Very, very lucky. I am trying to scare you because of the seriousness of this. The epi pen is the ONLY thing that can stop the progression of an allergic reaction that is going to become life threatening. Benadryl and other antihistamines do not have the power to stop the progression of a reaction from becoming life threatening.
The #1 cause of fatalities in food allergy reactions is not giving the epi within 10-30 minutes of the start of the reaction becoming systemic. Your child's reaction was not a minor localized reaction but was systemic. Any reaction with breathing problems no matter how minor is an automatic epi. Any doctor who tells you otherwise should is negligent in care.
Regarding the school, you must go make a clear, written plan so this doesn't happen again. Many people ask for food-free classrooms. Many others (including me) have 'treat boxes'. My son is not allowed to eat anything from anyone else's home. He eats what is in his lunch box or in his treat box and I put a symbol on his food so he knows it is from his treat box. I would never trust anyone else to decide what is safe for him to eat or not. Homemade treats from other's homes are always going to be a big risk and so unsafe. Your child should not be responsible for knowing what is or isn't OK. An easy way to do this IMO is with a treat box or just not having any food in the classroom.
The school could have killed your child. I would point this out to them and insist they make sure this doesn't happen again with a clear written plan that all teachers, including subs, as well as your child know.
Please see a good allergist asap. I also recommend you check out some basic books about food allergies. 'The Peanut Allergy Answer Book', 2nd edition by Dr. Young and 'Food Allergies for Dummies' by Dr. Wood.

Posted on: Tue, 05/10/2011 - 5:19am
HookwormIsHope's picture
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Joined: 10/13/2010 - 21:22

Yes, that is terrible. It's lucky that this reaction didn't escalate.

Posted on: Sat, 04/02/2011 - 1:49pm
I am Annie's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2011 - 15:48

I am happy to hear that he did not suffer a much reaction. That is one of the reasons why schools should not allow homemade items to be brought to school to be shared with other students. Ultimately it is the responsibility of the child to know of and be aware of their allergies. Additionally, the teacher should have made sure that anything brought into a classroom was safe for all of the children.
Even though I suffer from food allergies, as well as my two daughters, I do not think that schools should ban certain foods from what is served to our children. If we start banning peanuts, then anyone or any parent who has a child suffering from allergies with request, and quite possibly demand that the food they or their child(ren) suffer from, be banned as well.
If a child is too young to understand and recognize foods that they cannot eat, due to a serious reaction, then their parents need to take the precautions to ensure the safety of their child.
The school and teacher(s) need to be informed also, that the is a risk of an allergic reaction.

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