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Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:08am
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"Section 504 was enacted to "level the playing field" - to eliminate impediments to full participation by persons with disabilities. In legal terms, the statute was intended to prevent intentional or unintentional discrimination against persons with disabilities, persons who are believed to have disabilities, or family members of persons with disabilities."
from: [url="http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html"]http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html[/url]
"eliminate impediments to FULL PARTICIPATION"--gvmom-you are right; the snack box, individual cupcake, is not full participation.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:24am
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Quote:Originally posted by PinkPoodle:
[b]"Section 504 was enacted to "level the playing field" - to eliminate impediments to full participation by persons with disabilities. In legal terms, the statute was intended to prevent intentional or unintentional discrimination against persons with disabilities, persons who are believed to have disabilities, or family members of persons with disabilities."
from: [url="http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html"]http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html[/url]
"eliminate impediments to FULL PARTICIPATION"--gvmom-you are right; the snack box, individual cupcake, is not full participation.[/b]
I don't know. I'd like to believe you are right. So much so, for three years now, my older son's IEP has read, as a [i]goal[/i] of the specific accomodations enumerated, my child would "participate fully" alongside his non-disabled peers. In any instance. Birthday parties, celebrations, rewards, holiday's, whatever. It's in there.
But......how do you explain two entrances into our school building? One handicap accessible, on for the non-disabled. Sure, I can use either, but someone in a wheelchair cannot.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:26am
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Hello...
Just checking back in...
By using the wording "disservice" I didn't mean to be argumentative. I think it is great that this thread is out there and that people are getting what they need out of it. It is a really interesting perspective and I have learned from it, just don't agree with it for us. I only wanted to let folks know that not everyone shares the same perspective/experience.
I am happy with how we chose to handle it for my son (agreeing that his situation may not apply to everyone), and I feel that the way it was handled had a positive impact on how he views his allergy and its effect on his life. Just wanted to share.
I will drop out of this thread for now, as I sense that just bringing up another perspective is angering people...definately not my intention.
Regards,
Kelly

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:37am
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Kelly-you were definitely not angering me. I hope my tone didn't seem like I was angry at you. I had the same belief as you ("my daughter is not disabled") until I repeatedly saw her not being able to participate like her peers.
I think it helps to see all points of view. It doesn't mean we must all agree. What works for me might not work for anyone else.
#1 Mouser-I think the theory of full participation is accurate...not sure about the reality. That reality is not present in my DD's experiences. If I chose not to send her a safe treat, she wouldn't have one, the staff wouldn't be remorseful (it already happened), and she would not voice her discontent in school. The reason she will not speak up, "I don't want to bring up my allergies. I don't want my friends to feel bad". She wants to fit in, not make waves (I'm not sure she is truly my child [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]--other than she looks just like me). This year hasn't started yet, for us, and I'll see how it goes. I don't mind sending her egg-free, peanut-free, tree nut-free cupcakes to school for planned events. I do mind her being left out while everyone else gets a treat.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 3:39am
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Wow, Pink Poodle, you said things SO well. Where we, as PA parents, *may* not see our children as disabled, in America (and probably Canada), there is Federal Law that says that they are. That's what I was talking about. I don't see my son as disabled, but when I have to use the resources available to me, because he has a hidden physical disability, then yes, I use them.
kelly01, I don't think you're being argumentative at all or that you're even saying anything different than the rest of us. If that makes sense. You're saying that you don't view your PA child as having a disability. I'm saying I don't either unless I have to. Does that make sense?
Also, in remembering from quite a long time ago, I do think you approach things differently with your child's school, etc. than some of us do, but the thing is, you still have a point-of-view that is important to be heard.
It is often a *different* point-of-view that leads us to re-consider a particular position we have taken along this journey - maybe something as simple as not letting women's magazines' recipes "get" to you OR most certainly, in my case, Lam and other members telling me that because of the commotion in Grade 2 with my son - to take that "may contain" clause out of his written school plan. I didn't do it straight away. In fact, I didn't do it until Grade 4.
No, I don't see your posts as being argumentative at all - you are stating what you do with your child and you have certainly posted somewhere on this board how you deal with your child's school and yes, there are members that can benefit from that.
Even if you look at my post about our current school's Fun Fair - some people here would be saying right now that NO those things are not going to happen if my PA child is attending OR most likely (and sadly), we're not attending because those things are happening.
There are so many approaches, and as you've seen even from my last post, I'm not quite "getting it" because I think it's quite do-able what gvmom is asking and I even think getting people to *comply* (I hate that word almost as much as I hate how our PA children are *accommodated*), is do-able.
Oh, I do so want to go and have a filthy cigarette before I watch Without a Trace.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
There but for the Grace of God, go I.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 3:56am
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Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]Wow, Pink Poodle, you said things SO well. Where we, as PA parents, *may* not see our children as disabled, in America (and probably Canada), there is Federal Law that says that they are. That's what I was talking about. I don't see my son as disabled, but when I have to use the resources available to me, because he has a hidden physical disability, then yes, I use them.
kelly01, I don't think you're being argumentative at all or that you're even saying anything different than the rest of us. If that makes sense. You're saying that you don't view your PA child as having a disability. I'm saying I don't either unless I have to. Does that make sense?
[/b]
it does to me, but could you elaborate further, so people not confuse it with "Playing the Disability Card".
I look at it as when people demonstrate a lack of all sensibility in relation to a true need (ie: What's wrong with a food free classroom, anyway?), then yes, I tighten the screws on the rack. I may not get a food free classroom, but the end result will be just as efficient. A lot more annoying, but just as efficient. The choice is theirs.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:41am
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How does inclusion relate to Chanda's thread "Brainstorming MFA Table?" does inclusion include the cafeteria?
gvcmom....hope you are ok!

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:44am
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It has been very interesting to read everyone's thoughts on this. Ben is going into second grade and is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, egg, dairy, tomato, strawberry, peas, all legumes with the exception of soy. I have always been grateful that he is able to attend school at all and I do see him as being disabled. It is hard for me to even imagine how I would feel if his only allergy was to peanuts.
My perspective has always been that he will likely have to eat differently then others for his entire life. So for him to eat a home made safe cookie and sorbet while his friends eat cupcakes and ice cream is part of his education process. Is is hard for him, absolutely. He really wants not to be allergic to pizza in particular. But this is reality and part of my responsibility is to make he able to cope with his reality.
Ann

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:53am
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Ann,
I think the idea may be this...why aren't the schools [i]trying[/i] to include our FA children. When doing so isn't all that hard? What's the impediment other than 'it's the way its always been done?'.
Their lives are all about coping and being different. Can't we make the educational process an inclusive one, rather than just another [i]excluding[/i] part of their life?
Just a thought... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 5:04am
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Ask yourself, if the school offered you a food free classroom, non-food celebrations, or only pre packaged individually labeled items that were only passed out if they were safe for all... or what have you, would you take it? Or would you say, no that is not necessary...my child needs to be able to cope with his reality (just using Ann's words here, but really many my own, in fact would fit--not tying to start anything Ann, honestly [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]).
Would you say 'Heck ya, lets go food free!!' ? Why? So your child could be involved completely and safely, right?
Would [i]anyone[/i] say no to such a proposal? Anyone? And why? To teach your child to cope?
thinking out loud here...

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 5:42am
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
[b]
I think the idea may be this...why aren't the schools [i]trying[/i] to include our FA children. When doing so isn't all that hard? What's the impediment other than 'it's the way its always been done?'.
Their lives are all about coping and being different. Can't we make the educational process an inclusive one, rather than just another [i]excluding[/i] part of their life?
[/b]
Just answering outloud. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
. . . Drum roll, please:
[b]Top Suggested Reasons Why FULL INCLUSIVITY is Not Done:[/b]
1. Because what's "fair" for most is good enough.
2. Because our staff is already overwhelmed and cannot be bothered to manage this.
3. (Private School) Because another classmate's parents contribute big $$$ to this school and that child WILL have his "special day" the way HE (his parents) want it to be.
4. Because YOU cannot tell US what to do.
5. Because it's [i] just not done that way [/i] in our community.
6. Our community has a heritage based in this particular crop food. You cannot take away our childrens' heritage. (No lie.)
7. Little Johnny (another FA child they know) doesn't seem to think he needs this. Why are you so special??
8. You never asked for this before! Why do you need it now??
9. We're not going to do this unless somebody [i] makes [/i] us.
10. Because ______________________________
__________________________________________
_________________________________________ .
(Fill in blank with your own school's lame, worthless excuse for an excuse.)
- - - -
DO feel free to add your own to this list.
I feel better getting that out of my system.
Not trying to make light of this subject nor derail the topic. Already knowing the excuses we may hear allows us to be prepared with reasonable, unemotional, direct responses, like
[i] [b] IT'S MY CHILD'S RIGHT. [/b] [/i]
------------------
~Eli[b]Z[/b]abeth,
Mother to 2:
DD age 5, NKA, treated as though PA/TNA
DS age 8, PA, possible TNA, Latex, legumes?
(PA diagnosed & ana reaction 1999)
Member here since 2000
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 15, 2007).]

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 6:10am
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10. Because in the very long history of schooling in this country, the "tidal wave" of food allergic kids in the school system, combined with increased knowledge/awareness of families and the public at large re: food allergies is a very recent phenomenon.
-------------------------------------------
If you look at the history of the schools forum in PA.com, for example, there was early trailblazing work around 504's in the 2001-2002 timeframe. When I came here in 2002, there was just enough critical mass of information, combined with research being done at the time and media articles, that I had enough to put together a compelling case to fight for a 504 in 2003. Now, we've advanced to the point there is a pretty good amount of information here and other places to help guide folks for the 504 process.
But, you'll note that over the last 4-5 years, and right up to the present day, we still see many posts that reference that a school has [b]never[/b] done a 504 for food allergies before, or that they have been done poorly, etc. So on the grand timeline, this is a sufficiently new enough issue that the school mindset just isn't always there yet, much as we wish it would be.
Think about the implementation of mainstreaming physically/mentally disabled children into classrooms. It took decades after laws were passed for schools to really get on the ball and better integrate this into their thinking. Not saying it will take decades for the subject of food allergies, but it's important to examine this subject against the broader backdrop.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 6:24am
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[b]gvcmom....hope you are ok! [/b]
Just checking in. Answer is, not really. Can't elaborate. I really, really, really wish I could.
Suffice it to say, there are times in your life when what you say you believe in, truly, is put to the test. And for me, I'm gathering my money together to put it where my mouth is.
I know I have emails to answer and Q's here that have been posed to me, but I hope you'll understand if I don't get to them.
*raising arm* *letting out primitive roar*
I think I need to go make a placard.........

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 6:45am
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Quote:Originally posted by Sarahb:
[b]How does inclusion relate to Chanda's thread "Brainstorming MFA Table?" does inclusion include the cafeteria?
[/b]
I guess this is where the "homebound" discussion fits in. That or we need to rethink handicap entrances.
I guess if we can make the cafeteria safe for aerosol sensitive individuals, then we *should* be able to make all parking spots handicap accessible (including proximity) and not have to mark them as such. I just don't see being able to monitor the private lunches for 1100 students in my son's cafeteria to the point of making it safe for aerosol *or* contact sensitive individuals without a little cooperation from the food allergic family and individual. There is *going* to have to be compromise on both sides. No way around it. Unless you line them up prison style and shovel food onto their plates. And even then parents of food allergic children will want to bring *unsanctioned* food from home in. It's evident many people in the food allergic community don't trust each other to make safe food choices.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 8:24am
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We have been absolutely blessed with our school in that the principal said to me "we don't know what it is going to take to keep Ben safe, you tell us what you need and we will do it" Then his teacher called me before the school year started and before meeting me to tell me she took the list of things he was allergic to, went to the grocery store and checked everything she bought against the list just so she could try to grasp how complicated it is. She put them in seperate sections of her cart and when she was done and the tiny section of safe foods was so small she told me it moved her to tears. She was angelic and moved from first grade last year to second grade this year and Ben will have her again!
There is no peanut products allowed in the classroom at all with no exceptions. We provided a selection of snacks that are for any child at any time for any reason. We have families for whom English is not their first language and have sent in nut foods because they did not understand, that snack is replaced with a safe one and a note sent home. If a child forgot their snack or didn't like what was sent or any other reason they could pick a safe alternative.
For times when a snack was sent in that Ben could not have we kept Philly Swirls and fruit snacks on hand. A treat that was not the same does not seem to me to be wrong because he is not quite the same. Maybe it helps that in his class is a lovely girl with Downs who needs some adaptive technology, a family who spend part of the school year visiting family in India, a child who is Jehovah's Witness and does not participate in all activities, and on and on. Diversity in many ways, Ben's differences are just part of who he is.
I go to every party, every field trip, and am welcome at any time. I do not go in and hover, I just go and help in any way I can be useful.
Many times during the year Ben can have what the other kids have, other times he can not. Would I like for him to be able to feel free to eat anything and not feel different. I would like for him not to be different, I would like to not have this threat in our lives. That is not the hand we were dealt. What I think is in his best interest for his life skills is to be able to accept as fact his limitations and learn that while it is not just like everyone else it is managable.
At a birthday day party at Chuck E Cheese he was given a piece of cake by one of the helpers. I was so proud when my 6 year old handed it back and matter of factly said "I am not going to eat this, I have no idea what is in there" and then turned to his safe rice crispie treat and ate it while laughing with his friends. This is the best I can hope for, life skills.
Ben is allergic to 25 different foods and at age 7 has not outgrown a single allergen.
Ann

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 9:03am
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hi gvmom,
will you email me? it's in my profile! thanks

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 10:52am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]Answer is, not really. Can't elaborate. I really, really, really wish I could.
[/b]
Hoping things turn around . . . keep us posted when you can. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
~Elizabeth

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 1:28pm
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Sending you lots of support gvmom. I so wish I could do something to help you. Just know how we are all behind you.
many many hugs...keep your chin up.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 9:10pm
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It is late, I am fried, but I

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 12:11am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]
And, btw, just a point of clarification, are you really inferring that my motivation has nothing to do with ensuring my children are safe, first and foremost? That their physical and mental health aren

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 12:38am
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I think, for me it is just that school, children's activities and their lives just need to be less centered on food.
A 10 minute moving up ceremony for cub scouts involved one den mom bringing custom decorated cupcakes for her den.
Star of the Week in 3rd grade was supposed to be about a parent taking time out of their day to interact with the kids. It ended up being an event of who can bring the tastiest treat. IMHO a birthday celebration at school should consist of singing happy birthday and maybe a visit from the principal. Birthday parties with food can be enjoyed at home.
If we just try to redirect people to the mindset that not every event in life requires food for it to be enjoyable. That would eliminate a lot of food from our classrooms.
By tying a wellness policy to the planned snack time, it would also eliminate nearly all high risk allergens from classrooms.
We wouldn't need safe treats, people wouldn't be left out.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 2:56am
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I agree, as I posted earlier in the thread, I believe the Wellness Policy in each district should be enforced by the administration. My 12 yo DS is starting middle school this year. I received paperwork home from the transition class he attended and the following are listed as lunch options:
Regular lunch menu
the "grill"
salad bar
or ala cart (french fries, donuts, nochos, soda, candy bars, etc.)
Why is all this food necessary to begin with at school..for profit?
My PA son is still at the elementary level so I have a few years before we need to deal with the middle school, but I just don't understand how a school (5-8th grade)that has a wellness policy in place can serve these items on a daily basis to our already over-weight children. It HAS to be about profit.
If the school would just follow the wellness policy, none of us would have to worry about the cupcake queens. This should be much easier than it ends up being.
I know that I am going to start with the administration, then the school board to have the policy already in place followed.
gvmom...sorry things are so difficult for you right now. I hope you find a solution that will work for your family. Take care!

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 3:55am
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[b]When I typed that, it came from a sincere sense of caring and wasn't intended as a judgement, but only as a "just in case".[/b]
I just wanted to be clear. I remember you and I, in a past life, discussing the in

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 5:32am
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Quote:[b]Honestly, if I had my druthers, if it was all about me, I

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 5:52am
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[b]In light of the previous statement, you can't possibly feel that way, and I wonder, if in your opinion, you feel the same about any parent who *would* send a treat box in.[/b]
I can absolutely feel that way. I hope, sincerely, that anyone who reads my statements doesn't think that I believe their choice to do other than what I am choosing means that I believe the motivation in their hearts doesn't come from and earnest place, a genuine desire to do what's best, for their children.
Challenging a long-held position doesn't mean I question a parents steadfastness to their child.
I can absolutely challenge the idea of a treat box. I have sent one in for 3 years. Whether I send one in or not doesn't make null and void that which compels me to do right by my child. But what compels me to do right by my child can absolutely null and void certain practices which I think might be doing him a disservice.
[b]All the same, I applaud your um....moxy, but still offer the caveat, and offer it in good faith. I know all too easy how tempting some things are.[/b]
There are many temptations in life. Certain of those I haven't indulged in so far, and will continue not to. That is the beauty of self-restraint.
[b]No challenge, just wondering, is the entire premise of your current mindset what is "right" legally?[/b]
What is posted here gets added bonuses of philosophical waxing peppered in. Emotions also are allowed their voice. My current mindset in this thread is to explore a multitude of facets with respect to what I've put out there. With a stress on legality.
In real life, if we are talking about dealing with the school, whole different enchilada. I mean, heck, I wouldn't even use "enchilada" with them unless it is in the context of the USDA Dietary Accommodations.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 6:17am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]I can absolutely feel that way. [/b]
It's impossible for me to believe considering the aspersions you placed around how I witheld my children's attendance. I am, afterall, probably the only poster in this thread who fits the description of purposely withholding their childrens' attendance. First of all, I've never flipped any of them the bird. Double, or otherwise. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
As a matter of fact, I just had a heart to heart over the phone with the director of special educations services.
I was praying she hadn't quit.
I shared some very personal and detailed and in some cases, probably unnecessary, details of my life, current or otherwise. I'm glad she took the time to listen. She never acts rushed. She's one of the first people, other than my husband, I told I was pregnant. If there is anything I'm thankful for, it's my ability to wear my heart on my sleeve, even though some might call it a curse.
Again, I'm rooting for you, take it at face value. If I didn't care, I wouldn't add the caveat.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 6:24am
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
They speak of discrimination occurring only when a substitution is not offered. The whole school is not required to be offered the same lunch. This might viewed as being legally acceptable for the classroom as well.
--------------------
Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
You know though, this could be an interesting legal point. I'm going to have to go back through the booklet that goes with the USDA form for meal accommodations to review the language.
Point is, if the school spends enough time to find a safe substitution at other times, why not just dispense the safe substitution for all?
----------------
Quote:Originally posted by PinkPoodle:
This is an interesting avenue because in the lunch example (USDA) the SCHOOL is required to provide the substitution. They couldn't possibly provide a substitution cupcake for MFA children without it being certified as: MFA-free. Have they ever seen the price of cupcakes from Divvies ? We (PARENTS) are the ones providing the substitutions---and yes, I know we are not talking about LUNCH, but if the SCHOOL is sanctioning this activity of cupcakes galore during class hours (not us parents---I would definitely prefer a non-food celebration room & my guess is most of us here prefer that), then the SCHOOL should be obligated to provide the alternative.
-------------
I think this is amazing. Thank you.
Our Food Service offers cupcakes for sale (per dozen?) to parents who wish to purchase them for classroom birthday (or other) celebrations. The Food Service (Chartwell's) advertises this service to parents as convenient and "nut free". It never occurred to me that these cupcakes could have been used as a substitute treat that the SCHOOL provided my child.
I think the concept of the SCHOOL (not the parent of the FA child) providing the alternative safe substitute treat is viable. At least it would be in my situation where the food serivce can provide the school with a safe and comparable substitute.
Brilliant.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 6:44am
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Gail, thank you for pulling those 3 posts like that and how you put it. How you managed to wade through it all amazes me... but I wanted to thank you for that.
Having a tidy "connect the dots" is just what I needed to help my brain right now with that USDA idea.
[b]It's impossible for me to believe considering the aspersions you placed around how I witheld my children's attendance. [/b]
Well, then, that is an issue for you to decide if it is worth working on. I didn't cast aspersions, I questioned you. I can't make you believe.
[b]I am, afterall, probably the only poster in this thread who fits the description of purposely withholding their childrens' attendance.[/b]
Which is precisely why I did question you... challenge even. If you and I are both acknowledging that we come closest to fitting the description, why can't I question what you are doing? I'm trying to figure things out for a whole bunch of muck on my end. If you felt I was putting the screws to you with respect to your earnestness towards your motivation, I already apologized. But, really, some things I ask, and I ask it directly... maybe you don't like the tone... but it is what it is....and it could be there's a reason for the wording. Possibly immediacey? Maybe not wanting to get bogged down in certain things. I know we are treading carefully here for a multitude of reasons, but can't I just ask something with a "let's cut the cr** tone?" (yeah, I used 2 asterisks. Sorry to anyone who it offends. "Poo" just doesn't work)
[b]I was praying she hadn't quit.[/b]
Be thankful for that. Her not quitting. That's as close to an elaboration as you are getting.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 6:54am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]
I think the concept of the SCHOOL (not the parent of the FA child) providing the alternative safe substitute treat is viable. At least it would be in my situation where the food serivce can provide the school with a safe and comparable substitute.
[/b]
Just thinking outloud -- I could see the school (district) claiming this to be cost prohibitive and, finding its back against the wall, having to reconsider allowing any food treats AT ALL into the classroom.
~Eliz

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:05am
gvmom's picture
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[b]Just thinking outloud -- I could see the school (district) claiming this to be cost prohibitive and, finding its back against the wall, having to reconsider allowing any food treats AT ALL into the classroom.
~Eliz[/b]
Just musing out loud. Not at all my official stance. I think it would be enjoyable to watch a district accept the idea that they did have to provide a safe alternative (which I agree with).... embrace it since it promotes their willy nilly attitudes that kids should have a right to a birthday treat, and that food is something they can't set limits on Then, as they get swamped with requests from cupcake queens and must-have-trays-of-food party moms, they realize the folly of their move..... prompting them to be the kill-joys for once, feeling the wrath of all of those who feel entitled to their junkfood, causing them to spend their days regretting ever letting cupcake queens rule the school in the first place.... thus deciding to ally with the Food Allergic community. Food in the classromms banned forever!!!! *the crowd cheers* And children with FA's living happily ever after, and those other kids managed to survive into adulthood without a cupcake in school.
The End.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:07am
ajas_folks's picture
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May I write the theme music to this feature presentation? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Elizabeth

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:12am
gvmom's picture
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Absolutely. How about some background dancers too.... with some "jazz" hands maybe?

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:15am
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this is gettin' good

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:16am
lilpig99's picture
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you can use the glittering reflection from my '504 for private school tiara' as a stage light. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:21am
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Quote:Originally posted by lilpig99:
[b]you can use the glittering reflection from my '504 for private school tiara' as a stage light. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img][/b]
No, no, NO, honey.
Lilpig -- You're going to sit there in your regal glory in some big, overstuffed chair (ala Alistair Cooke) and introduce this special Hallmark Feature. Complete with dazzling headpiece. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:23am
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]Absolutely. How about some background dancers too.... with some "jazz" hands maybe?[/b]
YES!
We'll call them the
[i] Cupcake Heads [/i].
~Eliz

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:28am
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Quote:Originally posted by ajas_folks:
[b] No, no, NO, honey.
Lilpig -- You're going to sit there in your regal glory in some big, overstuffed chair (ala Alistair Cooke) and introduce this special Hallmark Feature. Complete with dazzling headpiece. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz[/b]
Oh I am ROTFLMAO!

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:33am
lilpig99's picture
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[url="http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/fanrr34/fanrr34-7/fanrr34-7.pdf"]http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/fanrr34/fanrr34-7/fanrr34-7.pdf[/url]
[i]Competitive Foods:
Soft Drinks vs. MilkFood Assistance Research Brief
Biing-Hwan Lin, [email]blin@ers.usda.gov[/email], (202) 694-5458
Katherine Ralston, [email]kralston@ers.usda.gov[/email], (202) 694-5463[/i]
Here are some selected tidbits:
[i]A USDA Report to Congress found that

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:49am
Gail W's picture
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But nonetheless, classroom parties are school events. Children with FAs require safe food to access and participate in such school functions. Why is it the responsibility of the *parent* to provide a safe substitution so that their child will not be excluded? Do schools exclude children with other disabilites unless the parent provides a substitute 'something' that allows their child to participate? KWIM?

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 7:57am
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LILPIG! FAB!!! Printing now... gonna go read as I think up titles to our production.
"The Rise and Fall of the Cupcake Queens"
"Civilization and Its Food Allergic Malcontents"
"For Whom the USDA Tolls...."
"Gone with the Cupcake"
"If There Be Cupcakes..."
"Forever Food Free"
...just off the top of my head... with help from my bookshelves.....and I'm so punchy, I think I could add a ton more. I really am a barrel of laughs......

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 8:17am
gvmom's picture
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Again, musings. Wouldn't it be worth changing our language to start referring to birthday foods and party foods, PTA junk too, as "Competitive Foods"? And I don't mean just here. Get people used to hearing it. Using it.
The key sentence for me in that document is,"School food authorities and State agencies may impose additional restrictions on competitive foods in schools."
Help me with the theorem.... okay.....
If we as parents start using "Competitive Foods" to describe the food that needs restrictions.... which invariably gets rebutted with a "we can't restrict a parent's right to .... (I'd insert 'be an idiot' if I could, but....), couldn't we introduce the USDA's definition? They provide the label. They provide the definition. They provide the allowance for additional restrictions.
Viable rebuttal to not placing limitations? Might be, it seems to me.
More documents to read though.... but that is just what came to mind right now.

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 8:26am
ajas_folks's picture
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Gail -- first I want to apologize for taking this off track with a bit of levity. I just sensed that gvmom was hanging on to the end of the rope by just one paw (picturing the poster from the 70's with the cute kitty hanging on to knot at end of rope).
Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]But nonetheless, classroom parties are school events. Children with FAs require safe food to access and participate in such school functions. Why is it the responsibility of the *parent* to provide a safe substitution so that their child will not be excluded? [/b]
IMPHO, it has become the parent's "responsiblity" because we took that onto ourselves, voluntarily. Because many schools have been allowed an easy way out of their "inclusiveness predicament" by the parents who have been [i] accomodating the school [/i] by providing the safe treats.
Want to insert here, that I bear that responsibility myself and am NOT FAULTING any of us who have done this & may still do this as a means of keeping child totally safe. It's just that we've let the schools off the HOOK!
Quote: [b]
Do schools exclude children with other disabilites unless the parent provides a substitute 'something' that allows their child to participate? KWIM?[/b]
I daresay not nearly as often or [i] blatantly [/i]. Because, afterall, we are "just" talking about a "food allergy" -- a condition NOT taken seriously or even understood by most non-FA folks.
Just a little story to share:
The other day, in a very quiet, nice conversation I was having with another classroom mom -- I used the example of having a "class celebration" for my son's class where they go ice skating -- a VERY special event for these southerners, in the kids' minds anyway -- and asked the mother I was speaking with how little "Mary Beth" might feel if the only way she was accomodated as far as being "INcluded" was to sit next to the rink and count the other kids' laps. "Mary Beth" is currently wheel chair bound. (She may be back on both feet in months to come.) This mother I was talking to (not "Mary Beth's mother, but another classroom mom) looked at me with this WOW look, teared up, and thanked me. Profusely.
~Elizabeth
[This message has been edited by ajas_folks (edited August 16, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 8:37am
ajas_folks's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]Again, musings. Wouldn't it be worth changing our language to start referring to birthday foods and party foods, PTA junk too, as "Competitive Foods"? And I don't mean just here. Get people used to hearing it. Using it.
The key sentence for me in that document is,"School food authorities and State agencies may impose additional restrictions on competitive foods in schools."
Help me with the theorem.... okay.....
If we as parents start using "Competitive Foods" to describe the food that needs restrictions.... which invariably gets rebutted with a "we can't restrict a parent's right to .... (I'd insert 'be an idiot' if I could, but....), couldn't we introduce the USDA's definition? They provide the label. They provide the definition. They provide the allowance for additional restrictions.
Viable rebuttal to not placing limitations? Might be, it seems to me.
More documents to read though.... but that is just what came to mind right now.[/b]
YES YES YES!!
~Eliz

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:00am
Sarahb's picture
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Was that cat white or orange? I think I had that poster. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:07am
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I LOVE...LOVE...LOVE...the term "competitive foods". I will have to add that one to my "terms to use during schools meetings" file.
I can imagine..."I'm sorry I just don't see how Sally's mom sees it necessary to bring a 'competitive food' for the birthday party. I wonder how the USDA would view all these cupcakes at school on such a regular basis."
Thankfully last year my ds's teacher was wonderful and thought birthdays, in general, were over done and she followed the wellness policy. Remains to be seen what the teacher this year will do.
[This message has been edited by notnutty (edited August 16, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:17am
gvmom's picture
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[b]I can imagine..."I'm sorry I just don't see how Sally's mom sees it necessary to bring a 'competitive food' for the birthday party. I wonder how the USDA would view all these cupcakes at school on such a regular basis."[/b]
YES! And I might add something like, "The USDA allows the school and the state the latitude to place restrictions on competitive foods...."
And you know, all of this discussion, in conjunction with the other thread about LTFA's affecting learning, should really have all of our wheels turning when we think about the idea of "Standard of Care". What that means to us as a community and for us as parents. I think it requires a big shift in thinking about what is promoted out there.... I wish I could put my finger on something that is nagging me at the back of my mind right now with this.
I need coffee....... I guess the kids won't bring that to me either.........
edited to fix my grammar -- whew-wee -- things are going down hill with my sentence structure this afternoon!
[This message has been edited by gvmom (edited August 16, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:28am
Going Nuts's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by gvmom:
[b]LILPIG! FAB!!! Printing now... gonna go read as I think up titles to our production.
"The Rise and Fall of the Cupcake Queens"
"Civilization and Its Food Allergic Malcontents"
"For Whom the USDA Tolls...."
"Gone with the Cupcake"
"If There Be Cupcakes..."
"Forever Food Free"
...just off the top of my head... with help from my bookshelves.....and I'm so punchy, I think I could add a ton more. I really am a barrel of laughs......[/b]
"The Cupcakes of Wrath"?
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:42am
lilpig99's picture
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[b]IMPHO, it has become the parent's "responsiblity" because we took that onto ourselves, voluntarily.[/b]
Yep, Elizabeth, you are very much correct, we have allowed it, and many of us will continue to follow this path in the interest of keeping our children alive at school. Certainly, we'll do it until we don't [i]have[/i] to any longer....when the law is on our side there will be no mistake about it. We can be the impetus, I believe.
Your story gave me goosebumps Eliz. How smart of you, and deeply thoughtful.
[b]"School food authorities and State agencies may impose additional restrictions on competitive foods in schools."[/b]
Is the USDA up to task here?? My goodness, I would love to pose this to the regional director for Civil rights (USDA FNS). I have wanted to update her on my case, since her responses to me were very key to our situation. She and I attended the same college---nearly different eras, but...we've got repoire (sp?) dare I say. I would love to ask the most perfectly formed question of her...something for her to chew on , something to CC up the chain of command so to speak. It would have to be worded in such a way as to completely connect the dots, draw the reasonable and obvious conclusions. Something including my new mantra 'competitive foods'. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
I have been all over that USDA site for the past 8 months or so. The article I posted was honest to goodness the very first one I saw for the parameters I searched for. Give me a little more time and I bet I can bring you more.
Gotta bathe the kiddos. You guys are great.
See you later...
[This message has been edited by lilpig99 (edited August 16, 2007).]
[This message has been edited by lilpig99 (edited August 16, 2007).]

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 9:54am
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

Quote: Originally posted by gvmom: [b]
"The Rise and Fall of the Cupcake Queens"
"Civilization and Its Food Allergic Malcontents"
"For Whom the USDA Tolls...."
"Gone with the Cupcake"
"If There Be Cupcakes..."
"Forever Food Free"
[/b]
AND
Quote:Originally posted by Going Nuts:
[b] "The Cupcakes of Wrath"?
Amy
[/b]
I SOOOO needed that laugh. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
~Eliz

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2007 - 10:00am
anonymous's picture
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[b]"The Hand That Frosts the Cupcake"[/b]

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