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Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:08am
PinkPoodle's picture
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Joined: 06/12/2007 - 09:00

"Section 504 was enacted to "level the playing field" - to eliminate impediments to full participation by persons with disabilities. In legal terms, the statute was intended to prevent intentional or unintentional discrimination against persons with disabilities, persons who are believed to have disabilities, or family members of persons with disabilities."
from: [url="http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html"]http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html[/url]
"eliminate impediments to FULL PARTICIPATION"--gvmom-you are right; the snack box, individual cupcake, is not full participation.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:24am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by PinkPoodle:
[b]"Section 504 was enacted to "level the playing field" - to eliminate impediments to full participation by persons with disabilities. In legal terms, the statute was intended to prevent intentional or unintentional discrimination against persons with disabilities, persons who are believed to have disabilities, or family members of persons with disabilities."
from: [url="http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html"]http://www.wrightslaw.com/advoc/articles/504_IDEA_Rosenfeld.html[/url]
"eliminate impediments to FULL PARTICIPATION"--gvmom-you are right; the snack box, individual cupcake, is not full participation.[/b]
I don't know. I'd like to believe you are right. So much so, for three years now, my older son's IEP has read, as a [i]goal[/i] of the specific accomodations enumerated, my child would "participate fully" alongside his non-disabled peers. In any instance. Birthday parties, celebrations, rewards, holiday's, whatever. It's in there.
But......how do you explain two entrances into our school building? One handicap accessible, on for the non-disabled. Sure, I can use either, but someone in a wheelchair cannot.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:26am
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Hello...
Just checking back in...
By using the wording "disservice" I didn't mean to be argumentative. I think it is great that this thread is out there and that people are getting what they need out of it. It is a really interesting perspective and I have learned from it, just don't agree with it for us. I only wanted to let folks know that not everyone shares the same perspective/experience.
I am happy with how we chose to handle it for my son (agreeing that his situation may not apply to everyone), and I feel that the way it was handled had a positive impact on how he views his allergy and its effect on his life. Just wanted to share.
I will drop out of this thread for now, as I sense that just bringing up another perspective is angering people...definately not my intention.
Regards,
Kelly

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 2:37am
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Kelly-you were definitely not angering me. I hope my tone didn't seem like I was angry at you. I had the same belief as you ("my daughter is not disabled") until I repeatedly saw her not being able to participate like her peers.
I think it helps to see all points of view. It doesn't mean we must all agree. What works for me might not work for anyone else.
#1 Mouser-I think the theory of full participation is accurate...not sure about the reality. That reality is not present in my DD's experiences. If I chose not to send her a safe treat, she wouldn't have one, the staff wouldn't be remorseful (it already happened), and she would not voice her discontent in school. The reason she will not speak up, "I don't want to bring up my allergies. I don't want my friends to feel bad". She wants to fit in, not make waves (I'm not sure she is truly my child [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]--other than she looks just like me). This year hasn't started yet, for us, and I'll see how it goes. I don't mind sending her egg-free, peanut-free, tree nut-free cupcakes to school for planned events. I do mind her being left out while everyone else gets a treat.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 3:39am
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Wow, Pink Poodle, you said things SO well. Where we, as PA parents, *may* not see our children as disabled, in America (and probably Canada), there is Federal Law that says that they are. That's what I was talking about. I don't see my son as disabled, but when I have to use the resources available to me, because he has a hidden physical disability, then yes, I use them.
kelly01, I don't think you're being argumentative at all or that you're even saying anything different than the rest of us. If that makes sense. You're saying that you don't view your PA child as having a disability. I'm saying I don't either unless I have to. Does that make sense?
Also, in remembering from quite a long time ago, I do think you approach things differently with your child's school, etc. than some of us do, but the thing is, you still have a point-of-view that is important to be heard.
It is often a *different* point-of-view that leads us to re-consider a particular position we have taken along this journey - maybe something as simple as not letting women's magazines' recipes "get" to you OR most certainly, in my case, Lam and other members telling me that because of the commotion in Grade 2 with my son - to take that "may contain" clause out of his written school plan. I didn't do it straight away. In fact, I didn't do it until Grade 4.
No, I don't see your posts as being argumentative at all - you are stating what you do with your child and you have certainly posted somewhere on this board how you deal with your child's school and yes, there are members that can benefit from that.
Even if you look at my post about our current school's Fun Fair - some people here would be saying right now that NO those things are not going to happen if my PA child is attending OR most likely (and sadly), we're not attending because those things are happening.
There are so many approaches, and as you've seen even from my last post, I'm not quite "getting it" because I think it's quite do-able what gvmom is asking and I even think getting people to *comply* (I hate that word almost as much as I hate how our PA children are *accommodated*), is do-able.
Oh, I do so want to go and have a filthy cigarette before I watch Without a Trace.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
There but for the Grace of God, go I.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 3:56am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Quote:Originally posted by Alternative to Mainstream:
[b]Wow, Pink Poodle, you said things SO well. Where we, as PA parents, *may* not see our children as disabled, in America (and probably Canada), there is Federal Law that says that they are. That's what I was talking about. I don't see my son as disabled, but when I have to use the resources available to me, because he has a hidden physical disability, then yes, I use them.
kelly01, I don't think you're being argumentative at all or that you're even saying anything different than the rest of us. If that makes sense. You're saying that you don't view your PA child as having a disability. I'm saying I don't either unless I have to. Does that make sense?
[/b]
it does to me, but could you elaborate further, so people not confuse it with "Playing the Disability Card".
I look at it as when people demonstrate a lack of all sensibility in relation to a true need (ie: What's wrong with a food free classroom, anyway?), then yes, I tighten the screws on the rack. I may not get a food free classroom, but the end result will be just as efficient. A lot more annoying, but just as efficient. The choice is theirs.

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:41am
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Joined: 01/22/2007 - 09:00

How does inclusion relate to Chanda's thread "Brainstorming MFA Table?" does inclusion include the cafeteria?
gvcmom....hope you are ok!

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:44am
ambreitner's picture
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Joined: 07/06/2006 - 09:00

It has been very interesting to read everyone's thoughts on this. Ben is going into second grade and is allergic to peanuts, tree nuts, sesame, egg, dairy, tomato, strawberry, peas, all legumes with the exception of soy. I have always been grateful that he is able to attend school at all and I do see him as being disabled. It is hard for me to even imagine how I would feel if his only allergy was to peanuts.
My perspective has always been that he will likely have to eat differently then others for his entire life. So for him to eat a home made safe cookie and sorbet while his friends eat cupcakes and ice cream is part of his education process. Is is hard for him, absolutely. He really wants not to be allergic to pizza in particular. But this is reality and part of my responsibility is to make he able to cope with his reality.
Ann

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 4:53am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Ann,
I think the idea may be this...why aren't the schools [i]trying[/i] to include our FA children. When doing so isn't all that hard? What's the impediment other than 'it's the way its always been done?'.
Their lives are all about coping and being different. Can't we make the educational process an inclusive one, rather than just another [i]excluding[/i] part of their life?
Just a thought... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 08/15/2007 - 5:04am
lilpig99's picture
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Joined: 12/22/2005 - 09:00

Ask yourself, if the school offered you a food free classroom, non-food celebrations, or only pre packaged individually labeled items that were only passed out if they were safe for all... or what have you, would you take it? Or would you say, no that is not necessary...my child needs to be able to cope with his reality (just using Ann's words here, but really many my own, in fact would fit--not tying to start anything Ann, honestly [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]).
Would you say 'Heck ya, lets go food free!!' ? Why? So your child could be involved completely and safely, right?
Would [i]anyone[/i] say no to such a proposal? Anyone? And why? To teach your child to cope?
thinking out loud here...

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