insurance cards

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 7:51am
lalow's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/24/2004 - 09:00

do you leave a copy of your child's insurance card with their epi-pens? is that necessary. or what do you put in there?

------------------
Lalow
James 4 yrs, NKA
Ben 3 yrs, PA and MA and SA

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 8:15am
Nutternomore's picture
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Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

We don't do this. Anyone (regardless of circumstance) who is rushed into the ER is going to be attended to (e.g. unconscious auto accident victim). Our emergency protocol is that after Epi is administered and 911 is contacted, we are contacted.
So...a parent will always arrive at the ER if we aren't with DS. My perspective is that we can settle billing issues later, once we've taken care of treatment. Can't remember, but MedicAlert might also have this info on file for us as a backup...
We do keep a copy of DS's emergency treatment plan with the Epi-pack, even though it is also elsewhere. That way, in the event of an emergency (e.g. earthquake, etc.) the plan is always with the Epi-pens...
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited September 10, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 8:38am
melissiabeth's picture
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Joined: 05/24/2006 - 09:00

My husband needed stitches recently and went to the ER- and oddly enough nobody came and took his insurance information. When we received the bills- there was a space to put your insurance info and I gave it to the hospital and it was paid. I'm still having problems with the radiology bill for the XRAY but really it has not been that big of a deal- I actually thought it was going to be more of a pain.
I had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic that required emergency treatment with epi, benadryl and steriods and they treated me first and then almost 2 hours later a woman come over and took my insurance info.
I don't have my daughters insurance info on her but medical alert does have the numbers. I've thought about making a copy and putting it with her epis but never got around to doing it.
I forgot to answer your other question- with my daughters medicine bag (in a pouch connected to her diaper bag) is 2 epis, benadryl, a syringe, an emergency plan with contact numbers and instructions on how to use the epi pen, and a couple of packets of wet ones)
As far the insurance info- after reading Carefulmom's post- I'm thinking it might be a good idea to request a duplicate card for her bag- because of the releasing early if stable. I am also remembering that a coworker of mine daughter broke her leg and before it was put in a cast they wanted the $100 copay we have for ER visits.
[This message has been edited by melissiabeth (edited September 10, 2006).]
[This message has been edited by melissiabeth (edited September 10, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 11:08am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Absolutely, yes. Always have, always will. She has the red emergency kit from FAAN. It has four things: epi, zyrtec, insurance card (I have one in all 4 of her epipen kits at school) and a piece of paper with the order to do things. It says:
1. Epipen
2. Call 911
3. Zyrtec 1 chewable tablet by mouth if conscious
4. Call mom (with my name and phone number, I am a single mom, so there is no one else to call)
I was hospitalized a few weeks ago, had to call 911, brought in by ambulance, and they sent me straight to the registration desk for my insurance info. Absolutely have it with the epipen. I had a surgical emergency and yet they wanted my insurance info before treating me. Also, I have worked in ERs, and if your child is conscious and looking pretty good after epi they will keep him for observation if insured, but if uninsured they will most likely send him out. This would not be true if he were unconscious or struggling to breathe, etc. But if he looks pretty good which if the epi works he may look pretty good, they will send him out if uninsured. Don`t know what they would do if insurance status is unknown. It seems kind of chancey when it is so easy to just put the insurance card in the epipen kit. They do not have to see someone uninsured if it is not an emergency, and if your child looks good who knows if they will consider it an emergency.

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 11:52am
NicoleinNH's picture
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Joined: 06/21/2003 - 09:00

EDIT
[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 09, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 11:59am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Here you will never even get to the doctor if uninsured and you are stable when you arrive. It is true that the doctors don`t care if you are insured and don`t even know. But you will not even be able to check in if uninsured and if you are stable.
I had a friend who had an appendicitis. She had just started a new job and insurance had not started yet. When she got to the ER she was stable, so since she was uninsured, they sent her to the County Hospital. There she sat for six hours while her appendix perforated.
Maybe it depends on where you live, but here you will never even be allowed to check in if uninsured and clinically stable.

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 12:29pm
Lindajo's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

At my kids' schools, we have to fill out emergency info and that includes our policy numbers for the medical and dental insurance, along with the doc's name, address and telephone #.

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 12:37pm
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Ours also, but the ER won`t check you in without an insurance card if you are stable. The ER isn`t going to accept the school`s form. They need the card itself. That is why I have it in dd`s epipen kits. When I arrived last month in an ambulance they would not have seen me if I did not have my insurance card. Also, I like having it in dd`s kit, because in the heat of the moment who knows if the school will send the emergency card in the ambulance when the card is in the office and your child is having a reaction in class, cafeteria, etc. I know at dd`s elementary school one of the other pa kids had to have the epi used, and everyone was in a panic. I don`t plan on my school remembering to send an emergency card that is somewhere else. I try to make it as foolproof as possible.

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 1:18pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My child's medicine bag at home contains 2 epi-pens; 2 doses of antihistamine; a sheet with information about his allergens, how to respond to a reaction, and contact phone numbers; and the insurance card. Yes, he'd get treated at a hospital without it, but sadly sometimes standards of care are better when they know you have insurance. The medicine bag at school has all of the above, but no insurance card. After reading Carefulmom's post, I'm going to request another copy of the insurance card so I can include it in there.
[This message has been edited by Mookie86 (edited September 10, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 8:15am
Nutternomore's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

We don't do this. Anyone (regardless of circumstance) who is rushed into the ER is going to be attended to (e.g. unconscious auto accident victim). Our emergency protocol is that after Epi is administered and 911 is contacted, we are contacted.
So...a parent will always arrive at the ER if we aren't with DS. My perspective is that we can settle billing issues later, once we've taken care of treatment. Can't remember, but MedicAlert might also have this info on file for us as a backup...
We do keep a copy of DS's emergency treatment plan with the Epi-pack, even though it is also elsewhere. That way, in the event of an emergency (e.g. earthquake, etc.) the plan is always with the Epi-pens...
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited September 10, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/10/2006 - 8:38am
melissiabeth's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/24/2006 - 09:00

My husband needed stitches recently and went to the ER- and oddly enough nobody came and took his insurance information. When we received the bills- there was a space to put your insurance info and I gave it to the hospital and it was paid. I'm still having problems with the radiology bill for the XRAY but really it has not been that big of a deal- I actually thought it was going to be more of a pain.
I had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic that required emergency treatment with epi, benadryl and steriods and they treated me first and then almost 2 hours later a woman come over and took my insurance info.
I don't have my daughters insurance info on her but medical alert does have the numbers. I've thought about making a copy and putting it with her epis but never got around to doing it.
I forgot to answer your other question- with my daughters medicine bag (in a pouch connected to her diaper bag) is 2 epis, benadryl, a syringe, an emergency plan with contact numbers and instructions on how to use the epi pen, and a couple of packets of wet ones)
As far the insurance info- after reading Carefulmom's post- I'm thinking it might be a good idea to request a duplicate card for her bag- because of the releasing early if stable. I am also remembering that a coworker of mine daughter broke her leg and before it was put in a cast they wanted the $100 copay we have for ER visits.
[This message has been edited by melissiabeth (edited September 10, 2006).]
[This message has been edited by melissiabeth (edited September 10, 2006).]

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