3 Year Old w/ PA

Posted on: Mon, 09/11/2006 - 3:21pm
chloebastian's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2006 - 09:00

Hello!

I've been visiting this site for over a year now and I have to say that the knowledge I've gained here has changed the way I handle my son's allergy. I have a 3 year old boy who is PA...and has major cat/mild dog and grass allergies. He only got hives the first few reactions...fixed with Benadryl...and then we had the BIG one. He ate part of a granola bar with peanuts and we had to rush him to ER. 2 doses of Benadryl, 2 epi's, some steriods later...he recovered. I'm obsessed now with keeping him safe. I have a 6 mo. old girl who I'm hoping will be FA free.

Posted on: Tue, 09/12/2006 - 1:10am
bethc's picture
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Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

Welcome! Your child's reaction history sounds similar to mine. Hives just aren't that scary, but an anaphylactic reaction makes you want to find out everything about keeping them safe.

Posted on: Tue, 09/12/2006 - 7:31am
chloebastian's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2006 - 09:00

Unfortunately, that seems to be an all too familiar story...I TRY to keep that in mind when I come across someone who doesn't understand how serious the allergy is. It took me almost losing my son to really "get it."

Posted on: Thu, 09/14/2006 - 6:54am
alwaysonmymind's picture
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Joined: 09/14/2006 - 09:00

could you tell me what happened ,like did he stop breathing
my son is 4 now and he only had the one anaphalatic reaction but i did not have to use the epi-pen
i fear the next reaction and keep him strickly away from nuts and he always has his epi-pen when we go out in a pouch around his waist.
just want to know details
like how long it took for ambulance
and was he breathing or concious
i appreciate your reply
thankyou
------------------
"lets make peanuts history, take them away, let our children be free"

Posted on: Thu, 09/14/2006 - 1:22pm
chloebastian's picture
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Joined: 09/11/2006 - 09:00

This happened when he just turned 2...We just got home from my sister's house (where I had picked up a half eaten peanut granola bar that one of her kids had eaten) and I was getting him ready for an appt. that we had for him with his ped. I didn't see him eat anything while we were there, but he did puke a little. He didn't have a rash or anything so I didn't think too much of it at the time (SO DUMB of me). Anyway, I was putting him into his carseat and noticed that his eyes looked like they had little blisters on them. Wasn't sure what was going on so I ran in and got some Benadryl and gave him a tsp. On the way to the Dr's appt. I looked back a couple mins. later and the "blisters" were growing FAST...panic now started because I realized he was having an allergic reaction. I did NOT have an epi-pen at this time...if I did I would have given it to him at this point FOR SURE. The car ride there was HORRIBLE...It was about 15 mins. to get there and by the time I got there his eyes were so swollen that you could just see little slits. I RAN him in...the doctors office is in a hospital by coincidence...my doctor saw him ASAP and gave him a epi-shot, more Benadryl and started breathing treatment. We took him downstairs to the ER and to make long story short...within 30 mins. his whole body was covered with hives from HEAD TO TOE...literally. The back of his legs were one BIG blistery hive. You couldn't make out his facial features...It was the scariest day of my life. They gave him SO much medicine to finally stop the reaction from progressing...and he had to continue to take it 2 or 3 days afterward. That was about a year and a half ago and that was his last "peanut" reaction. He's gotten hives from being around cats and dogs but nothing too serious. That experiance was such an eye opener for me...I was HOPING that he would never progress to that level of sensitivity, but he has and now just trying to handle it the best way I can.

Posted on: Tue, 09/12/2006 - 1:10am
bethc's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/18/2005 - 09:00

Welcome! Your child's reaction history sounds similar to mine. Hives just aren't that scary, but an anaphylactic reaction makes you want to find out everything about keeping them safe.

Posted on: Tue, 09/12/2006 - 7:31am
chloebastian's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/11/2006 - 09:00

Unfortunately, that seems to be an all too familiar story...I TRY to keep that in mind when I come across someone who doesn't understand how serious the allergy is. It took me almost losing my son to really "get it."

Posted on: Thu, 09/14/2006 - 6:54am
alwaysonmymind's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/14/2006 - 09:00

could you tell me what happened ,like did he stop breathing
my son is 4 now and he only had the one anaphalatic reaction but i did not have to use the epi-pen
i fear the next reaction and keep him strickly away from nuts and he always has his epi-pen when we go out in a pouch around his waist.
just want to know details
like how long it took for ambulance
and was he breathing or concious
i appreciate your reply
thankyou
------------------
"lets make peanuts history, take them away, let our children be free"

Posted on: Thu, 09/14/2006 - 1:22pm
chloebastian's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/11/2006 - 09:00

This happened when he just turned 2...We just got home from my sister's house (where I had picked up a half eaten peanut granola bar that one of her kids had eaten) and I was getting him ready for an appt. that we had for him with his ped. I didn't see him eat anything while we were there, but he did puke a little. He didn't have a rash or anything so I didn't think too much of it at the time (SO DUMB of me). Anyway, I was putting him into his carseat and noticed that his eyes looked like they had little blisters on them. Wasn't sure what was going on so I ran in and got some Benadryl and gave him a tsp. On the way to the Dr's appt. I looked back a couple mins. later and the "blisters" were growing FAST...panic now started because I realized he was having an allergic reaction. I did NOT have an epi-pen at this time...if I did I would have given it to him at this point FOR SURE. The car ride there was HORRIBLE...It was about 15 mins. to get there and by the time I got there his eyes were so swollen that you could just see little slits. I RAN him in...the doctors office is in a hospital by coincidence...my doctor saw him ASAP and gave him a epi-shot, more Benadryl and started breathing treatment. We took him downstairs to the ER and to make long story short...within 30 mins. his whole body was covered with hives from HEAD TO TOE...literally. The back of his legs were one BIG blistery hive. You couldn't make out his facial features...It was the scariest day of my life. They gave him SO much medicine to finally stop the reaction from progressing...and he had to continue to take it 2 or 3 days afterward. That was about a year and a half ago and that was his last "peanut" reaction. He's gotten hives from being around cats and dogs but nothing too serious. That experiance was such an eye opener for me...I was HOPING that he would never progress to that level of sensitivity, but he has and now just trying to handle it the best way I can.

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