37 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Thu, 05/25/2006 - 9:41pm
saknjmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

MCMOM,
Hi, how are you? I think that it was inappropriate for your doctor to say this, especially in front of your child. You have one, your child is wearing it, what can it hurt?
If you want a new dr., we use Dr. Perin in Teaneck. I have referred many people to him and they have been happy with him too. He has been wonderful in treating DS for his environmental allergies, food allergies as well as asthma.
I don't know what his stand is on Medic Alert, but I know he would never put you down for having one.
Also, someone posted that the "trendy ones" aren't recognized by EMTs. My son is involved in Cub Scouts and a leader (an EMT) from another school noticed his sports one right away and I asked him if they keep up on the new styles. He said yes, we are kept up to date on the MEDIC ALERT Brand.
Good Luck...

Posted on: Sat, 06/17/2006 - 8:22am
markwelch's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/07/2006 - 09:00

Oh I cannot believe this!! FIRE HIM!!! NOW!!! HOW CAN A DOCTOR THINK THEY DONT NEED IT ANYMORE??? Ok.. .I am done ranting now...
This post caught my attention. I have not posted here in a while, but last week I had a severe peanut reaction. It caught me by surprise and I think it was a cross contamination. I wear a med ID and I am 32 yrs old! I have had my allergy all my life. Without my medical ID, I think things would had gotten a lot worse! I was lucky that a friend of mine was with me who knew about my allergy, but really didnt "click" with them until I was on the floor and she saw my Medical ID bracelet. As they called 911, she ran to my truck to get my EPI and brought it to me. I was able to administer it myself, but when the ambulance arrived, they had to give me another injection before I arrived at the ER. Without that first injection, I do not know what the outcome would have been.
Keep the medical ID on your child. Who cares what the DR says. It might just save your child's life one day. It sure saved mine this week!

Posted on: Sat, 06/17/2006 - 8:35am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Wow. That is very scary. I am glad you are okay now.
Would you mind sharing details about what you think was behind your being "surprised" by cross-contamination? I think this is often helpful for us on the boards to think about in terms of avoiding similar situations (or at least asking questions that we otherwise wouldn't have thought about....)
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Tue, 06/27/2006 - 2:53am
TyTurner's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/27/2006 - 09:00

I tried to get HB to wear a bracelet and he kept playing with it. He has one of those "dog tags" that you can get information printed on. The chain is getting too small so I need to get a bigger one. HB doesn't mind wearing it, he always shows it to people to let them know what is going on with him. He even showed it to his doctors, they thought it was a good idea, I couldn't even imagine how I would feel or what I would say if his doctor said something like that. I would probably be speechless and HB would probably asks him if he was "nuts"

Posted on: Fri, 07/28/2006 - 11:17am
Triciasmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/03/2000 - 09:00

A little late to this thread I am.... I don't get onto the boards much these days. But one thing I can tell you with certainty is that the medic alert bracelet is one little piece of insurance against the unknown.
When we were in a car accident some years ago, I was in a total daze. The first thing the medical personnel did was ask Patricia if he could see her bracelet.
When we were at the ER, hospital, and any other number of circumstances that were not necessarily related to Patricia, there were several nurses or staff or doctors or other professionals that immediately spotted that bracelet and asked to see it.
Not only does the bracelet/emblem provide instant information about the nature of medical issue, it provides a phone number to Medic Alert and an ID number. With that, emergency responders who needed to know who Patricia was or what her medical history was could call and get information immediately... her name, her emergency contact information, her doctor's contact information, etc.
I can tell the paramedics all about Patricia and her allergy. But if I were not there or Patricia were unconscious, etc, the information would be there.

Posted on: Sat, 08/26/2006 - 2:13pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Wow, our Allergist told me get one for my son. He even wrote in on the school paperwork that my son would be wearing one.

Posted on: Sun, 08/27/2006 - 1:37pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

mcmom,
where did you get your sons id braclet. I just ordered one for my 4 year old and he doesn't really like it. He picked out the bands which have neat things on them but I was wondering if there was something else to look at.
Thanks,
Mary

Posted on: Sun, 08/27/2006 - 3:14pm
mcmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/15/2004 - 09:00

Ricky'sMom, my son just wears the basic silver bracelet from Medic Alert. He has been wearing it since he was about 4. He objected at first, but now he is so used to it (he's seven now!) that he doesn't even know it's there [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 05/10/2006 - 1:39pm
lmw's picture
lmw
Offline
Joined: 11/12/2005 - 09:00

DD's allergist told us to get her a medic-alert bracelet when she was diagnosed TNA 11 years ago. She's the one who has questioned over the years if she really needs it! I keep saying 'yes'. Especially now that she's PA, and out in her own a great deal.

Posted on: Wed, 05/10/2006 - 3:06pm
Nutternomore's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

What an idiot. Fire him and get someone who's knows what they are doing. AAAAI has several references in their materials about this. For example, the AAAAI position statment 34 on Anaphylaxis in School and Child Care Settings [url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/academy_statements/position_statements/ps34.asp"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/resources/academy_statements/position_statements/ps34.asp[/url] notes the usefulness of medical identification...
Quoting: [b]In addition, it is often useful if children allergic to foods wear some form of identification (eg, Medic-Alert bracelet or necklace or badges in nursery school).
[/b]
Also, similar points made in a press release from AAAAI and FAAN last year
[url="http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2005/08/081005.stm"]http://www.aaaai.org/media/news_releases/2005/08/081005.stm[/url]
Quoting: To protect your child, and prevent anaphylaxis, the AAAAI and FAAN encourage parents to take the following steps before the school year begins:
Work with an allergist/immunologist to identify your child's triggers and reinforce these to your child. [b]If possible, provide your child with a medical bracelet or necklace that identifies his or her specific allergy. [/b]
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited May 11, 2006).]

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

There are more "peanut-free" products than ever on the supermarket shelves. This means more choices than ever for peanut-allergic shoppers and...

A young food allergic child is unlikely to say, “My throat is swelling and I’m having difficulty swallowing - I think I’m having an allergic...

There is no definitive treatment for a peanut allergy. Because every case different, reactions will...

If you or your child has a peanut allergy, that unmistakable smell of peanuts wafting through the air...

Almond flour, or almond meal, is made from whole, untreated almonds. It is a wonderful substitute for wheat flour when people are trying to avoid...