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Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 4:30am
toomanynuts's picture
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Joined: 08/23/2003 - 09:00

I too would disagree with that method first posted. I would also have to say that Naet doesn't teach that method either. When dd or myself has accidentally ingested an allergen due to cross contamination both of our first response is either vomiting. Not induced though it just happened. Our doctor recommended that at exposure, cross contamination or reaction to take benadryl as quickly as possible but to also use the epi. I would never recommended the advise given. Maybe it works for him but that approach sounds like you are gambling with your life.
Blessings to all to stay nut free, safe and listen to your own doctors advise.
toomanynuts

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 6:43am
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Peg541:
[b]When my son had his first reaction he also vomited later on. The vomit brought the peanuts back up his esophagus into his mouth and sinuses almost totally closing off his airway.
I am very hesitant to recommend induced vomiting in a person who is already in trouble.
Peg[/b]
I agree with that, and after reading some more thoughts I probably wouldn't induce vomiting. However, I my allergist did say to me that drinking water or juice or something does help the stomache deal with the peanut protein.
In all my ingestion reactions though, vomiting just happened. My stomache filled with this mucus-nastiness as a natural protection mechanism (like how your nose will run/stuff up) and you can't help but vomit when that happens. Something to possibly be aware/cautious of for sure.
But yeah, aspirating peanut protein directly into the lungs would not be good.
I'll count my lucky stars that didn't happen to me.
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 11:05am
luvmyboys's picture
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Joined: 05/25/2006 - 09:00

During DS 1st anaphylactic rxn (before diagnosis so no epi and no clue what was happening) he vomited and then wanted lots to drink...he was 2 yrs old. Maybe the body instinctually knows to dilute what's in the stomach? Anyhow, would you follow your child's instincts and allow drinking of lots of fluid knowing it may induce vomiting, which could be dangerous? My tendency is to trust their instinct but it concerns me this could be dangerous. What are the chances of aspirating the vomit? Has this ever happened to anyone?
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 12:25pm
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by luvmyboys:
[b]During DS 1st anaphylactic rxn (before diagnosis so no epi and no clue what was happening) he vomited and then wanted lots to drink...he was 2 yrs old. Maybe the body instinctually knows to dilute what's in the stomach? Anyhow, would you follow your child's instincts and allow drinking of lots of fluid knowing it may induce vomiting, which could be dangerous? My tendency is to trust their instinct but it concerns me this could be dangerous. What are the chances of aspirating the vomit? Has this ever happened to anyone?
Luvmyboys[/b]
I'm not sure if my instinct to drink was of thirst or to try to get the "taste of peanut" out of my mouth/throat...the taste of hives.
In any event, I just wanted to drink drink drink, which of course made it easier to vomit.
Adrienne
------------------
30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 12:48pm
Momcat's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2005 - 09:00

The original poster appears to be a fraud. This "treatment" could kill somebody. It does nothing to combat anaphylactic shock, which is caused by a drastic drop in blood pressure. Epinephrine is the only treatment that will contract the blood vessels and reverse shock. Also, has anyone ever tried to spray anything on their vocal cords? I can't even see mine! Let's get real here. This person should not be giving medical advice, and the "N8" (=NAET) in his name is huge tip-off.
Cathy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 1:01pm
ajgauthier's picture
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Joined: 04/13/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Momcat:
[b]The original poster appears to be a fraud. This "treatment" could kill somebody. It does nothing to combat anaphylactic shock, which is caused by a drastic drop in blood pressure. Epinephrine is the only treatment that will contract the blood vessels and reverse shock. Also, has anyone ever tried to spray anything on their vocal cords? I can't even see mine! Let's get real here. This person should not be giving medical advice, and the "N8" (=NAET) in his name is huge tip-off.
Cathy[/b]
I've reported the thread/poster to Chris (owner of board) to see if he'll remove it...since...it may/is someone who is pretending to be a doctor and posting dangerous advice.
Adrienne
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30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 1:34pm
kf4c's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2002 - 09:00

My first thoughts on this post was 'imposter' ....maybe he is, maybe not--but either way, before anyone tries something 'new' like this--PLEASE check with YOUR OWN doc!!
Take care,
Lisa

Posted on: Sun, 06/11/2006 - 11:46pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

As soon as I read the sentence "#1 (most important) get the peanut out of your stomach." I sent out a mental message of "PEG YOU ARE NEEDED IN AN INTO THREAD". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] I was very glad to see she was already here. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Quote:Originally posted by N8healer:
[b] What is going to kill a person with PA is when the vocal chords swell and the airway is closed. [/b]
I don't think my throat swelled. However, my heart and lungs did. When they swell enough, the heart cannot pump, and air cannot go into your lungs. Then you die. Even if your vocal chords are fine and the airway is open.
And could one of our real professionals explain a bit about low blood pressure? I just don't understand it well enough to explain it clearly to a *doctor*. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img]
**********
Has summer break started already?

Posted on: Mon, 06/12/2006 - 2:27am
ElleMo's picture
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Joined: 06/19/2003 - 09:00

I am writing this for the people who may read this thread and actually think that this advice is good. Please ignore this person's advice! For detailed reasoning, see below:
Quote:Originally posted by N8healer:
[b]I am new to the board and introducing myself.[/b] You are not bothering to come back.
Clue one that you are a fraud.
Quote:get the peanut out of your stomach. . . It must be vomited up.
Which will not work and is dangerous to do when your airways are closing.
Clue Two you are a fraud
Quote:First I drink about a quart of water. This serves two purposes. first, it dilutes the peanut and buys time.
Many people react to "may contains" which have a minimal amount of peanut protein on them. I doubt a little extra water will not help and can only harm because (1.) it will delay your taking medicine that will help you and (2.) can be problematic if you throat is closing.
Clue three you are a fraud
Quote: My allergy is so severe that epinephrine injection is ineffective. . . . Dristan and other nasal decongestants contain a synthetic adrenaline product. I open my throat and spray A LOT of Dristan like product on my vocal chords. It is absorbed rapidly and helps with systemic anaphylactic problems as well.
A shot of epinephrine directly into the bloodstrean doesn't help you with a systemic reaction, but I am supposed to believe a spray of Dristan onto your vocal cords will?
Also, I cannot find any dristan product which has adreneline (aka epinephrine) as an ingredient. All I can find are simple decongestant products.
Clue four you are a fraud
Quote:I leave Dristan and Benadryl in my car, ... where, due to extreme heat or cold in the car, they will soon be rendered useless.
Quote: Of course, the most important thing is to avoid eating peanut products in the first place - ask and ask again, read labels, don't eat anything that you think might have peanut products in it and when in doubt -- don't eat it!
the only bit of good advice that you have given.
------------------
Ellen
Allergic to Shellfish/ Mom to Jesse 9/01 who has PA
Sometimes I just want to say "blah blah blah blah blah."
[This message has been edited by ElleMo (edited June 12, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 06/12/2006 - 2:49am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Not arguing with you Ellen, but wanted to point out, epinephrine is not given in a vein for anaphylaxis. It is [i]intra-muscular[/i].

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