Medical ID bracelet?

Posted on: Sun, 12/10/2006 - 9:15pm
KIMMO's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/04/2006 - 09:00

I was just wondering if I should get a medical ID bracelet & what I should have engraved on it? I've tested negative for allergies with the SPT & the RAST test, but I'm obviously having reactions to nuts & even to peas the other night. I've been staying away from nuts & I do have 3 epi's, 2 in my purse, & 1 in the kitchen cabinet.

Here were some of my thoughts of what I'm thinking that the bracelet should say:

undiagnosed nut allergy
possible anaphalctic reaction

Thanks for any input.

Posted on: Sun, 12/10/2006 - 11:14pm
Lindajo's picture
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Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

I would get a bracelet. You may have had a mild reaction, but the next one could be more severe. Sometimes those tests produce false negatives. As for the wording, I would say "Tree Nut allergy. Carries EpiPen."
My DD's says she's anaphylactic to Peanuts/Tree Nuts. Carries EpiPen and Benadryl.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 12:08am
TwokidsNJ's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2005 - 09:00

Be definitive on the wording.
Not "undiagnosed".
I'd get her diagnosed then order it.
Or for now just enscribe, "Peanut allergy" or "Tree nut allergies".
"Anaphalytic"
Remember who will be reading them (likely EMT); be definitive for emergency treatment.
Also I'd order from Medic Alert because they have the database and they are most known and recognized. And the bracelets hold up better, from what I hear. We have this kind, on wrists of 2 kids for 2yrs and holding up great (stainless).

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 5:15am
Lindajo's picture
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Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

[quote]the bracelets hold up better{/quote]
This is true about the bracelets from Medic Alert. My DD has had her same emblem for the past 8 years. She has only taken it off twice in that time. We've only changed the bracelet chain due to growth. It still looks as good as when we got it.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 7:15am
KIMMO's picture
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Joined: 11/04/2006 - 09:00

Thanks for your replies. How would I be officially diagnosed if the tests come back negative? I think I'm still going to get the medic alert bracelet. That's who I'm going to use. This is for me, I know I'm having reactions & they're getting worse. Friday night, I ate peas with dinner, after dinner I broke out in hives all over my face, I still have some dry skin on my face from where the hives were.
Thanks again!

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 9:56am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I would not put undiagnosed. If you're going to put that, there's no point in getting the bracelet b/c EMTs will doubt it's an allergic reaction. Since it doesn't hurt to give epi even if it wasn't needed, you don't want to create doubt. Plenty of people have negative SPTs and RAST tests, but they still fail a food challenge. That's basically your situation. You ARE allergic.
I have talked with a few EMTs about what to put, so I will relay what they shared with me. In your situation, I would put
SEVERE ALLERGY TO
ALL NUTS & PEAS
ANAPHYLAXIS
CARRIES EPIPEN
CALL 911
The company you decide to use will influence how many letters per line, how many lines (4 vs. 5), whether you can engrave on both front and back.
Since all of your allergies are not completely clear, I might go with MedicAlert and just list SEVERE FOOD ALLERGIES on the bracelet. MedicAlert will keep a database, and then someone could call for the detailed info. Personally, I prefer not to use MedicAlert. I don't like listing their 800# on the bracelet. I'm afraid someone will call that # for advice before calling 911. My child's bracelet says
PEANUTALLERGY
ANAPHYLAXIS
USE EPIPEN
CALL 911/OVER
back says
HIS NAME
CARRIES MEDICINES,
INSTRUCTIONS, &
CONTACT INFORMATION
Some people don't like putting a name on the bracelet. If someone is close enough to my child to flip over his bracelet and read it, then they've got him anyway. I think it's helpful to have his name on there since I choose not to have MedicAlert for the reasons I've already stated.
By the way, my child never has had an anaphylactic reaction. However, all of the EMTs said to put it on there anyway. It lets them know that it's a severe allergy and they should be looking for a possible anaphylactic reaction.
I think you're smart to get a bracelet. It's tough to choose exactly what to put on it, but whatever you decide will be a great asset to you.
[This message has been edited by Mookie86 (edited December 11, 2006).]

Posted on: Sun, 12/10/2006 - 11:14pm
Lindajo's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

I would get a bracelet. You may have had a mild reaction, but the next one could be more severe. Sometimes those tests produce false negatives. As for the wording, I would say "Tree Nut allergy. Carries EpiPen."
My DD's says she's anaphylactic to Peanuts/Tree Nuts. Carries EpiPen and Benadryl.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 12:08am
TwokidsNJ's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2005 - 09:00

Be definitive on the wording.
Not "undiagnosed".
I'd get her diagnosed then order it.
Or for now just enscribe, "Peanut allergy" or "Tree nut allergies".
"Anaphalytic"
Remember who will be reading them (likely EMT); be definitive for emergency treatment.
Also I'd order from Medic Alert because they have the database and they are most known and recognized. And the bracelets hold up better, from what I hear. We have this kind, on wrists of 2 kids for 2yrs and holding up great (stainless).

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 5:15am
Lindajo's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

[quote]the bracelets hold up better{/quote]
This is true about the bracelets from Medic Alert. My DD has had her same emblem for the past 8 years. She has only taken it off twice in that time. We've only changed the bracelet chain due to growth. It still looks as good as when we got it.

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 7:15am
KIMMO's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/04/2006 - 09:00

Thanks for your replies. How would I be officially diagnosed if the tests come back negative? I think I'm still going to get the medic alert bracelet. That's who I'm going to use. This is for me, I know I'm having reactions & they're getting worse. Friday night, I ate peas with dinner, after dinner I broke out in hives all over my face, I still have some dry skin on my face from where the hives were.
Thanks again!

Posted on: Mon, 12/11/2006 - 9:56am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I would not put undiagnosed. If you're going to put that, there's no point in getting the bracelet b/c EMTs will doubt it's an allergic reaction. Since it doesn't hurt to give epi even if it wasn't needed, you don't want to create doubt. Plenty of people have negative SPTs and RAST tests, but they still fail a food challenge. That's basically your situation. You ARE allergic.
I have talked with a few EMTs about what to put, so I will relay what they shared with me. In your situation, I would put
SEVERE ALLERGY TO
ALL NUTS & PEAS
ANAPHYLAXIS
CARRIES EPIPEN
CALL 911
The company you decide to use will influence how many letters per line, how many lines (4 vs. 5), whether you can engrave on both front and back.
Since all of your allergies are not completely clear, I might go with MedicAlert and just list SEVERE FOOD ALLERGIES on the bracelet. MedicAlert will keep a database, and then someone could call for the detailed info. Personally, I prefer not to use MedicAlert. I don't like listing their 800# on the bracelet. I'm afraid someone will call that # for advice before calling 911. My child's bracelet says
PEANUTALLERGY
ANAPHYLAXIS
USE EPIPEN
CALL 911/OVER
back says
HIS NAME
CARRIES MEDICINES,
INSTRUCTIONS, &
CONTACT INFORMATION
Some people don't like putting a name on the bracelet. If someone is close enough to my child to flip over his bracelet and read it, then they've got him anyway. I think it's helpful to have his name on there since I choose not to have MedicAlert for the reasons I've already stated.
By the way, my child never has had an anaphylactic reaction. However, all of the EMTs said to put it on there anyway. It lets them know that it's a severe allergy and they should be looking for a possible anaphylactic reaction.
I think you're smart to get a bracelet. It's tough to choose exactly what to put on it, but whatever you decide will be a great asset to you.
[This message has been edited by Mookie86 (edited December 11, 2006).]

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