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Posted on: Mon, 02/07/2005 - 1:14pm
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ElleMo:
[b] I will teach my daughter to never eat Asian food. I'd rather her think all Chinese food has peanuts then have her try to figure out on her own, as a teenager, what is ok and what is not.[/b]
I eat Asian food all the time. On the weekend, we had dinner at Prince Sushi restaurant (Hurontario and 401, Mississauga). And I have found several Chinese restaurants that are safe (for me.. I am only PA, not TNA).
One thing to remember... Western restauarts can be just as dangerous as Asian restaurants. A lot of western restaurants serve peanut butter sandwiches, or toast with peanut butter, etc.. and a knife used to slice a grilled cheese sandwich could have previously been used to slice a peanut butter sandwich. Dangerous.
My decision whether to eat in a restaurant is to ask questions and determine whether I consider it safe, and if I question it, to eat elsewhere.
Not all Chinese restaurants are safe.. just as not all western restaurants are safe. Just recently I saw an Italian restaurant that had peanut sauce as a pizza topping.
So you always have to be careful at all restaurants [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Mon, 02/07/2005 - 1:25pm
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by erik:
[b] I eat Asian food all the time.
[/b]
just be careful mister!

Posted on: Mon, 02/07/2005 - 2:05pm
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by momma2boys:
[b] just be careful mister![/b]
yes.. I have been so careful, I am 39 now and never had a reaction at an Asian restaurant. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] hehe Although I don't eat at any restaurant if I have any doubts at all.
I am very careful at restaurants. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I always ask. ask. ask. Always carry an epi-pen. And I am lucky I have some friends who speak Cantonese, which can make it much easier as well [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Fortunately, some Chinese restaurants in Toronto do not use peanuts. They all use tree nuts, and cashews are quite common, although I am fortunate not to be TNA (although I don't eat tree nut dishes anyway). If I was TNA, it would be very difficult to find a safe Chinese restaurant.
p.s. I have found all Japanese restauarnts safe.. so far, I have never foudn a Japanese restaurant that uses peanuts

Posted on: Mon, 02/07/2005 - 8:16pm
Claire's picture
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Joined: 04/19/2000 - 09:00

YES we avoid Chinese. To risky and not worth it to Chris. He is fine without trying that. He loves seafood and gets plenty of that instead.
One thing that always scares us with chinese is they don't understand half of what we say and pretend they do.
Take care claire

Posted on: Tue, 02/08/2005 - 2:03am
CatSchmidt's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2004 - 09:00

My daughter's very first violent reaction to ANYTHING was at 4 months old. I ate Chinese food on a Friday night and nursed her the following morning twice. By that afternoon she was vomiting violently with hives and eczema all over her body. It was the one and only time I ate Chinese food while nursing and it never happened again.
I will never take her to a Chinese restaurant and don't eat it in front of her either. We get take out occasionally (handful of times a year) and we ALWAYS eat it after she is in bed.

Posted on: Tue, 02/08/2005 - 2:37am
erik's picture
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Joined: 05/15/2001 - 09:00

yes, there can be a definite language barrier at times
as an example, when I was recently in Beijing, China, I only ate McDonald's and hotel food, as I was not able to communicate to any restaurant staff due to the language barrier so it was too risky to eat at any of the restaurants
however, I did eat frequently at restaurants in both Hong Kong and Singapore and had no problems finding safe places to eat
if you want to see a place with lots of peanuts, check out a Thai restaurant - I never eat in Thai restaurants as the majority of dishes contain peanuts or peanut sauce
Quote:Originally posted by Claire:
[b] One thing that always scares us with chinese is they don't understand half of what we say and pretend they do. [/b]
umm .. ok .. I would have stated that as "One thing that always scares us with chinese restaurants is [b]that some of the staff[/b] don't understand half of what we say and pretend they do"
(some Chinese people actually do speak English)

Posted on: Tue, 02/08/2005 - 7:08am
ElleMo's picture
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Joined: 06/19/2003 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by erik:
umm .. ok .. I would have stated that as "One thing that always scares us with chinese restaurants is that some of the staff don't understand half of what we say and pretend they do"
(some Chinese people actually do speak English)
I do have to agree with your post; however, language barriers do exist at many Chinese restaurants, as they do at many other ethnic restaurants. And comments about speaking English may not be as racist as they appear.
In my area (NJ/NY), most Chinese restaurants that aren't chains are owned, run, and/or primarily staffed by immigrants, so I do worry about communication issues. Larger restaurants are not as big a problem, there is always an American or bilingual chef or manager around; but smaller restaurants or take-out places may be entirely staffed on a particular night by immigrants who do not speak English well.
The main issue for me, however, is what is on the menu. In every menu that I have looked at recently, there is at least one entree, if not more, with peanuts. That is not within my comfort zone. I do not allow my daughter to eat at any restaurant that serves peanuts, peanut butter or most nuts, regardless of what language is spoken at the restaurant.
We also avoid Thai and Mexican food and most salad bars.
------------------
Ellen
Allergic to Shellfish/ Mom to Jesse 9/01 who has PA
Sometimes I just want to say "blah blah blah blah blah."
[This message has been edited by ElleMo (edited February 09, 2005).]

Posted on: Tue, 02/08/2005 - 7:46am
solarflare's picture
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Joined: 02/07/2002 - 09:00

I think it is safe to assume that unless you live in an area where there are not a lot of immigrants, that there is going to be a language barrier. Here in California, a lot of kitchen workers are Hispanic, and may or may not speak very good English. I remember a visit to Applebees a couple of years back when the people next to use ordered a gluten free meal and the kitchen staff screwed it up, and the manager told the couple that he was having to train new people since INS had cleaned them out a couple of weeks ago!

Posted on: Wed, 02/09/2005 - 2:05pm
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

Boy, isn`t that the truth! I`m in California too. But at P.F. Changs it is an upscale chain of gourmet Chinese food, and I have never seen a waiter there whose native language is not English (they are all Anglo/caucasion/ or whatever the proper term is). I would not take dd to a mom and pop Chinese restaurant because of the language issue. But PF Changs is nothing like that.
My rule in restaurants is if someone has a thick accent, I just have to assume they don`t understand what I am saying. I cannot take the chance that they act like they understand and they really don`t. So if someone has a thick accent, we just move on to another restaurant.

Posted on: Wed, 02/09/2005 - 2:26pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Haven't read the whole thread - will later.
However, Carefulmom, you make a good point. If someone has a heavy accent and it's quite obvious that they aren't going to understand your English and therefore your questions very well, we don't go.
In Stayner, it was a Mom and Pop Chinese Food restaurant and really they could not understand what we were asking.
I thought about this last week when DH and I went out and had lunch at a Lebanese restaurant. We both had Falafels. Now, I'm fairly sure that all of the food in the restaurant is PA safe and also, the particular one we went to (Jane and Bloor in Toronto), the people did speak very good English so I might (notice, might) take Jess there.
But the Lebanese restaurant at Yonge just south of Bloor, much heavier accent, basically the same menu, and no, I probably would not take Jesse there.
The same can be said for just a regular greasy spoon depending on how well the staff speak English. I've spent 6 years living in places that weren't terribly multi-cultural, but now that I'm back in "the big city", I know that although some opportunities will open up as far as restaurants (as erik has posted), some will also close if the people do not speak English well.
Oh, and another Lebanese restaurant Em and I went to. No way, no how, Jess would have gone in with me. Just off Yonge Street, just north of Dundas.
So, it's not just Chinese food, but could be all restaurants really.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

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