Daycare question

Posted on: Tue, 12/31/2002 - 4:24am
Francine7's picture
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Joined: 12/30/2002 - 09:00

Hi I'm new here. I'm so glad to have found this very informative site!

My 18 mo son was Dx w/ PA at about 12 mos. He had been given a pb cracker to eat at his daycare (I'm so angry/regretful b/c I always provided his food & snacks & don't know why they gave it to him - AAargh!). He had a serious reaction - his entire face & neck turned flush/red, his eyes were completely red & swollen almost shut, he was crying & coughing. BTW, would that have been defined as "anaphylaxis"? Luckily his daycare is in my office building & I was able to get there quickly. Benadryl cleared up the reaction fairly immediately.

We were referred to an allergist & he tested + to soy (skin) & very high + to peanuts (blood). He always had terrible diaper rashes & started getting eczema on his face so I suspected allergies. He was strictly breast fed & there was no family history - go figure! He's now off all beans, peas, soy, peanuts & nuts & has been doing great.

His daycare has been great about accomodating him & eliminating peanuts from the classroom. However, this week he is graduating to the next class, which is slightly bigger. His new teacher is frightened about him having a reaction. She told me that she plans to have him eat apart from the other children b/c it's hard for them to ensure that the kids don't take food from each other. I can understand her concern, but it hasn't been a problem in his current class. We have informed parents not to send pb snacks, etc. & the teachers make sure nothing like that is served.

I guess this is more of a pity party than a question - I just feel so sad that they would isolate my son. He already is so sensitive to social situations & has terrible separation anxiety when I drop him off. But, my question is, is it better/safer to have him eat by himself, or should I insist that they allow him to sit w/ the other children? His new teacher plans to send a letter to all the parents telling them not to send pb foods. Is it really necessary to separate him as well? Also, these children were all in his previous class but graduated ahead of him, so most of the parents should already be aware.

Thanks for listening!

Fran

Posted on: Tue, 12/31/2002 - 7:52am
Carefulmom's picture
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Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

My dd was 2 years 11 months when she started preschool, and is also allergic to milk and egg, so chances were high that whoever was eating near her had something she was allergic to (bread for example, most kinds are not safe, tuna salad, egg salad, macaroni and cheese, etc., etc.). She always sat with the other kids and we never had any trouble, although she was older than your child. Still it is young enough that kids may try to pass food, and it was up to the teacher to be sure that didn`t happen. In the U.S. it is ILLEGAL to separate your child due to a disability. It is hard for me to say you should or shouldn`t do it, since my daughter was older when she started. Also at one point they had her in with kids four to six months older because they felt older kids are less messy and less likely to try and pass her food. But ultimately it is up to the teacher to make sure this doesn`t happen, so personally I think your new teacher is in the wrong. I don`t know her, but it strikes me as somewhat lazy that she isn`t willing to just watch her kids and make sure kids don`t food share, she would rather ostracize your child instead. That is SO ILLEGAL!
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited December 31, 2002).]

Posted on: Tue, 12/31/2002 - 7:52am
Carefulmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/03/2002 - 09:00

My dd was 2 years 11 months when she started preschool, and is also allergic to milk and egg, so chances were high that whoever was eating near her had something she was allergic to (bread for example, most kinds are not safe, tuna salad, egg salad, macaroni and cheese, etc., etc.). She always sat with the other kids and we never had any trouble, although she was older than your child. Still it is young enough that kids may try to pass food, and it was up to the teacher to be sure that didn`t happen. In the U.S. it is ILLEGAL to separate your child due to a disability. It is hard for me to say you should or shouldn`t do it, since my daughter was older when she started. Also at one point they had her in with kids four to six months older because they felt older kids are less messy and less likely to try and pass her food. But ultimately it is up to the teacher to make sure this doesn`t happen, so personally I think your new teacher is in the wrong. I don`t know her, but it strikes me as somewhat lazy that she isn`t willing to just watch her kids and make sure kids don`t food share, she would rather ostracize your child instead. That is SO ILLEGAL!
[This message has been edited by Carefulmom (edited December 31, 2002).]

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