I\'m new

Posted on: Wed, 01/08/2003 - 11:44pm
tiredmom's picture
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Joined: 01/09/2003 - 09:00

Hi everyone. I just took a quick look around, and you are all so well informed. Our 2 year old is allergic to eggs and peanuts, and recently we found out through an anaphylactic reaction that he is also allergic to cashews.
While we have never, ever given him anything with peanuts, it seems they are lurking everywhere!
My wish is to learn a lot from all of you, and hopefully, at some point, I will have something to offer to others!

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 12:07am
AJSMAMA's picture
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Joined: 06/12/2002 - 09:00

Welcome!
Jaime

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 12:34am
river's picture
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Joined: 07/15/1999 - 09:00

Welcome tiredmom! Many children with peanut allergies are allergic to tree nuts also. No one knows why. It is best to avoid all nuts---always. If you don't have an good allergist who is providing you with information you need to know, here is a site that is loaded with stuff. Also, don't be afraid to come here and ask questions.
[url="http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm"]http://www.allerg.qc.ca/peanutallergy.htm[/url]
[This message has been edited by river (edited January 09, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 1:13am
synthia's picture
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Joined: 10/05/2002 - 09:00

Welcome tiredmom
You will find a lot of helpful in fo here.
We are here to help.
Love this site
Synthia

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 8:50am
nopeanuts's picture
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Joined: 06/20/2001 - 09:00

Welcome tiredmom - I can relate to your username! I have found out a ton of information from this board and hope it will be useful to you too. A lot of nuts are cross-contaminated with peanuts due to their processing, so even if your child is not allergic to one nut, it may be contaminated with peanut so it is best to avoid all nuts.

Posted on: Thu, 01/09/2003 - 12:59pm
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

I echo what everyone else has said already, including relating to your username. I would recommend getting a lot of epi-pens, an epi-belt when your child is ready for school, a medic-alert bracelet, and spending a lot of time researching stuff here. Welcome.
------------------
Cynde

Posted on: Fri, 01/10/2003 - 4:07am
austin2001's picture
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Joined: 05/03/2002 - 09:00

Double Ditto for me! Welcome! I also have a 20 month old who is anaphylactic to eggs and peanuts. we have known for almost a year now, and these boards will help you out a bunch!

Posted on: Sat, 01/11/2003 - 12:15am
kelly01's picture
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Joined: 03/19/2001 - 09:00

Hi Tired Mom:
Welcome! Glad to have you here! My son with PA is 6 now and we found out about it when he was 2 (although we were lucky as this was the only food allergy we dealt with). At first the info on PA was overwhelming, but eventually things got easier. Take care and hope to see you posting again soon.
Kelly

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 5:08am
LisaMcDowell's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2002 - 09:00

Hi Tired Mom,
I referred you here even though I go by a different user name on the other discussion board. I'm glad you've come here, I hope someone can help you! Please return to the other discussion board if you receive some helpful tips, I'm certain the other parents would appreciate it, and it would be fair for the people who established that discussion board especially since they are just starting out. Stay safe & good luck!

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 5:17am
LisaMcDowell's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2002 - 09:00

Tired Mom,
I forgot to mention: foodallergy.org for the Food Allergy & Anaphylaxis Network (FAAN). If you call them you will find that they are very good at teaching one how to effectively communicate w/school administrators, the public, etc. Their # is: 1-800-929-4040.
Some people on this website do not promote FAAN for personal reasons of their own. One I have found is that some are for banning PB in schools. I do not support this since it could lead to banning milk for the milk allergic & so on & so forth. Anyway, get your questions posted!

Posted on: Sun, 01/19/2003 - 5:52am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Tired mom,
Welcome to the board! A thought just occurred to me: Maybe, if actions such as respecting the necessity of having epinephrine readily available, formally training those who would be administering the epinephrine(when an individual for whatever reason is not able to administer it themselves) --------this would include recognition of symptoms of reaction and anaphylaxis and appropriate steps to take if this is required and steps to take if the individual administers their own epinephrine, taking reasonable steps to limit exposure to the the anaphylactic individual of the offending allergen, demonstrating a working knowledge and understanding of the pathophysiology of the allergy (in which it would be put in the simplest terms possible and still convey the required information), and demonstrating an understanding of the concerns an anaphylactic individual and family of such person might have by not devaluing their concerns through their actions, words, or failure to act in a humanitarian way......................some parents would not resort to requesting "Peanut free schools" This list is not all-inclusive. I also understand there are some pretty accomodating schools out there that are definitely trying to work with the situation, care givers, parents, child, physician, medical needs,teachers, etc (as per posts on this board). By no means am I stating either case, "Peanut free schools" or "Non-Peanut free schools" to be the correct choice. I am, however, trying to understand the motivation in either case.
MommaBear
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited January 19, 2003).]

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