In the Beginning.....

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 10:08pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

If it isn't too prying, and you are comfortable with it,

...describe your pregnancy (with PA child), labor, delivery, in terms of complications or lack thereof. Conditions diagnosed etc.

...describe your child's (PA child) first week of life in terms of complications or lack thereof. Conditions diagnosed, etc.

...describe your child's (PA child) first year of life
in terms of complications or lackthereof. Conditions diagnosed, etc.

MommaBear (PS, I will post my answers after I get my children off to school!) [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 11:03pm
Laureen's picture
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Joined: 01/26/2003 - 09:00

My pregnancy was great. No complications. When I went into labour there was question as to when my water broke so when DD was born she was put on antibiotics right away just to be sure. I've often wondered if this had anything to do with her allergies. Her first year of life she had a lot of allergies...milk, eggs, different kinds of fruit. We didn't know about the PA yet but because of her history the MD perscribed the epi-pen. Thank goodness we had it because when she got into some pb fudge in the fridge within seconds she was on the floor unconscious not breathing. This must of been her second contact. I think her grandfather must have given her something with pb before that time. I had explained her problem with allergies and not to give her nuts but he is one of the ones that used to think that one little peanut wouldn't hurt.

Posted on: Wed, 02/05/2003 - 11:28pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Maybe off topic, but I found these links interesting:
[url="http://pulseplanet.nationalgeographic.com/ax/archives_science_subcat.cfm?subcategory=FUNGI"]http://pulseplanet.nationalgeographic.com/ax/archives_science_subcat.cfm?subcategory=FUNGI[/url]
[url="http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2321.html"]http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2321.html[/url]
[url="http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2322.html"]http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2322.html[/url]
[url="http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2323.html"]http://www.pulseplanet.com/archive/Jan01/2323.html[/url]
[url="http://www.chemheritage.org/EducationalServices/pharm/antibiot/readings/ferment.htm"]http://www.chemheritage.org/EducationalServices/pharm/antibiot/readings/ferment.htm[/url]
[url="http://www.tallpoppies.net.au/florey/explorer/story/72ex.html"]http://www.tallpoppies.net.au/florey/explorer/story/72ex.html[/url]
Disclaimer: I do not guarantee the accuracy of any of the links in this post.

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 12:31am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Still have a house-full of sickies, so I will be brief.
Pregnancy and delivery, uncomplicated (other than 5 months of unremitting nausea). Vaginal birth with epidural.
First hours - already spitting up like a fountain.
First week - milk jaundice, resolved with no intervention.
First months - unlike first child who didn't get so much as a sniffle until after his first birthday, Kevin got his first cold at 3 weeks. It was all downhill from there. Sick all the time, wicked eczema. At 4 months started having bloody diapers. MD told me to discontinue milk in my diet, bloody diapers stopped. 4 1/2 months - first of many, many episodes of severe stridor. 9 months - What was believed to be RSV. 10 months - dx asthma. MD started suspecting all sorts of food allergies (but never mentioned peanuts or nuts) and put me on elimination diet.
And so it goes.
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 12:58am
Klutzi's picture
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Joined: 03/10/2002 - 09:00

My pregnancy was very routine. No real problems except for the 2 weeks before DD was born. My blood pressure skyrocketed & I had to be on bedrest. DD was born 2 weeks before due date. I was induced & from the time they broke my water until DD was born was a little under 3 hours. Very Easy delivery. She was perfectly healthy with lots of hair.
DD first week of life was pretty uneventful. She did lose over a pound in the first 2 days & I had to supplement breast feeding with formula feeding.
DD first year was pretty uneventful too. She had only 1 earache & had no reactions to any of her immunizations.
She didn't have her first PA reaction until 18 months when we gave her a taste of peanut butter. Her lips began to swell & she had a head to toe rash. We called doctor. They put her on Benedryl & called in an Epi-pen Jr. prescription for us & told us to avoid peanuts as she was allergic to them.
At her 2 year checkup, I had the doctor give us a referral to an allergist as I had recently found this group & knew she needed to be tested. It's a good thing we did as we found out she is also allergic to Cashews & mildly to eggs (which she has outgrown). So now we avoid all Peanut & nut products as well as may contains & always carry epi-pens.
Lea (mom to Jamie (PA & TNA) -almost 3 & to "David" due 4-15)

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 1:05am
AJSMAMA's picture
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Joined: 06/12/2002 - 09:00

Alright, not sure if everyone will want to read this but here goes:
Pregnancy: Went into pre-term labor at 6 months. It was stopped for me (thank God) and I then went on bed rest. Carried my PA son to 41 weeks.
Labor/Delivery: Started on my own (no induction). Lasted 18 hours. I refused all drugs (STUPID!). My son would not descend fully so my "fill-in OB/GYN" (my original doc was on vaction) used the vaccuum again and again. It was the most horribly excruciating pain I have ever felt in my entire life. After about five failed attempts at suctioning my son out they then decided to have a GIGANTIC L/D nurse apply fundal pressure. Basically she was just laying on me while they stuck that @#$% vaccuum up me again. I screamed obscenities so loud that my family heard them all the way down the hall and out into the waiting area.
This went on for about two hours and then my heart rate went through the roof and my son's plummeted. So we were off to an emergency c-section.
My son was not breathing at birth and had to be intubated. He was kept in the NICU and was given intravenous antibiotics. He came off of the vent rather quickly and then did okay.
FIRST WEEK HOME: He cried all the time and slept hardly none. He had a huge bruise on his head from the failed vaccuum attempts and several bruises on his arms and feet from the IVs. He wouldn't eat which the pediatrician said was because his throat was probably still irritated from the ET tube.
FIRST YEAR: It took him SEVEN weeks to learn how to breastfeed. He only ate breastmilk, but I had to pump it out and put it in a bottle for him. He has no lasting effects from his traumatic birth. He was diagnosed w/ PA at nine months after I let him have a tiny taste of pb ice cream.
Jaime

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 1:38am
becca's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

1) Conceived via IUI, uneventful pregancy, full term, went into labor on own, but given pitocin after muconium in water, and no dialtion. Many hours later, after cranking pit. still only 2cm, administered epidural, went to 10 cm in 2 hours, pushed out in 45 mins. All very peaceful after the epidural, LOL, and until it wore off(grrrr),then a boost, ahhhh! Dd was a muconium baby and needed alot of suctioning and some O2, but was fine, with us and feeding within an hour, I would guess.
2) First week. Milk very slow to come in, hot out, sleepy baby with jaundice, but eventually all fine. Slow to regain, but hanging in without supplementation. Finally milk came in and reflux kicked in! Terrible baby acne(or eczema too, looking back).
3) First year was great, but always on the skinny side, light appetite, reflux if big feed(projectile a whole feed). Frequent, smaller feeds controlled reflux weel, along with sitting upright 20 mins after each feed. I wonder if I knew of allergies if I might have tried some elimination diets...next time... One or two colds, maybe. Eczema well controlled with Dove soap, eucarin lotion, and nearly gone by 9 mos. Mostly occ. patches after a single horrible flare. Breasfed exclusively6 mos, and then until 21 mos.
becca
3)

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 2:08am
cynde's picture
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Joined: 12/10/2002 - 09:00

Had a fairly uneventful pregnancy, except I had to have 5 ultrasounds. Each time they found some measurement to be border line for something serious. So I would have to go back and have it re-checked, then that potential problem would be OK, but they would find something else. The last thing they found was a low level of amniotic fluid. So they decided to induce me basically on my due date, and I was already in pre-labour. It took about 12 hours, asked for drugs, but told it was too late. The last hour of my labour was during visiting hours and when DH escorted baby to the nursery he got a lot of pats on the back and lots of people saying "your pooor wife". I screamed like a banshee, which a nurse friend of mine told me was good. My DH was trying to make me feel bad later so he said to the doc, wasn't that the worst scene in a delivery room. The doc said he had a woman get up off the table and try to leave. She had had enough, boy can I relate. Had to have an epesiotomy (kids head way to big). He was perfect.
First week of life he just slept, I had to wake him to feed him, I was so engorged. He was a very easy baby, healthy, happy and slept a lot. Although that could be typical, I was just comparing him to his big sister who had been a very demanding baby, who rarely slept.
I told people I would have another child in a heartbeat if I could be guaranteed it would be as easy as him. But he now makes up for it by being the biggest stress in my life. I'm not referring to his PA, he's an adrenaline junkie who knows no fear and is constantly hurting himself. Friend that we go camping with say it wouldn't be an authentic camping trip with our family if our DS wasn't bleeding at least once a day.
------------------
Cynde
[This message has been edited by cynde (edited February 06, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 2:18am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Pregnancy uneventful until the last month. At 36 weeks, admitted to hospital for preeclampsia. After a few days, condition worsened, so they enduced labor (piece of cake) 3 1/2 hours later, Mitch was born.
First day--would not suck, so I could not breast feed.
First 5 weeks--pumped breast milk and fed via bottle, supplemented feedings with formula. Vilolent projectile vomiting from certain formulas--Used Lactofree (purple) formula with the most success.
First 10 months--Severe reflux issues. Used Lactofree formula. Would "spit up" 50-75 times a day (I know because the dr. didnt believe me, so I kept a log). Bad eczema as well.
Year 1-2-Uneventful--ate PB regularly, however, still dealing with eczema.
About 2 1/2- First reaction to peanut butter--splotchy hives on his face.
[This message has been edited by mitch'smom (edited February 06, 2003).]

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 3:22am
StephR's picture
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Joined: 02/03/2003 - 09:00

During my pregnacy with Cody the ultrasound tech discovered and enlarged kidney, but told me that it would probably correct itself before the baby was born. My labor and delivery was great, my water broke on its own, and 4 hours later Cody came out. No epidural or any other drugs.
His first week he had to be on a biliblanket for jaundice, and because of a toungue-tie he had problems learning to nurse. A few weeks later he was diagnosed with reflux, (I had to force the doctor to treat this, because he told me I was blowing the hours on end of screaming out of proportion), and he also had his kidneys ultrasounded. The kidney is still enlarged, but after doing more tests, the doctor says it's fine.
Now we are still battling reflux (at 7 months), and we just discovered his PA after he grabbed some peanut butter that was on a sandwich for my older son and broke out in hives.
~Steph, mommy to Deuce(3 years) and Dakota(7 months)

Posted on: Thu, 02/06/2003 - 5:08am
Gail W's picture
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Joined: 12/06/2001 - 09:00

My pregancy was uneventful (medically, speaking. I enjoyed large amounts of peanuts, BTW.) My weight gain was at the high end~ about 40 pounds. My dd just didn't seem to want to come out, tho. I was induced 6 days after her due date. L o o o n g labor....forcepts delivery (vacuum unsuccessful). No wonder: 10 pounds 4 oz.
Her first week she slept a lot and had trouble latching on. After several visits by a lactation consultant, we finally figured out how to nurse. She ended up nursing for the next 2 years.
First year: I would describe her as a pretty fussy baby. (As a first-time mom, I didn't realize this until many years later when we had our second child. She seemed so easy compared to our PA dd.) First "significant" reaction occurred at 11 months (long story, it was our first time EVER using a babysitter. Apparently DD picked up a peanut from the floor and put it in her mouth). Anaphylaxis, ER, admission for 24 hour observation.
I ate peanut butter while I nursed (until her reaction, when I stopped, of course). In retrospect, I've wondered if this explains her "fussiness".
Gail

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