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Posted on: Wed, 09/03/2003 - 3:32pm
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

Thanks, I'll have him check it out.
peggy

Posted on: Thu, 09/18/2003 - 1:16am
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Just be careful about antihistamines. They can actually block some of the warning signs of anaphylaxis starting. My allergist told me that UNLESS I'm going to take the epi and go to the ER, any exposure that causes wheezing (which for me are thakfully only peanut and soybean), taking Benadryl is actually dangerous. For NON-life threatening reactions (I have many more of those), I SHOULD take the Benadryl. But then again I'm kinda stubborn about epi and hospitals. I would ask your allergist about your situation. I think this stuff varies widely.

Posted on: Thu, 09/18/2003 - 1:55am
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Sillyfeline,
[b]This is a quote from Tando's answer above:
"If your son think's in terms of black and white, perhaps it would help him to think in terms of variables in an equation.
What's the allergen form
Likelihood of exposing him to proteins
How much exposure
To what part of his body
How long
Then he can consider the cumulative impact of those variables"[/b]
This is the one that worked for my son the best. I think reading this helped him to evaluate his situation a bit better and become more comfortable while still maintaining his strict vigilance. That does not seem possible to me but he's living the life so he is the one who now dictates his comfort zones.
And as to antihistamines, my son reacts very quickly to ingested or airborne peanut. He is really aware of his physical state. If he can get away from the airborne peanut quickly enough then Benadryl will help but he is very aware if it is not so I have to trust he'll do the right thing.
Thanks for your input.
Peggy

Posted on: Thu, 09/18/2003 - 5:30am
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I didn't mean to offend anyone. Just passing along what I was told by my allergist: that Benadryl will help the reaction at hand, but may also mask the progression of something larger. Please do not read into it anything beyond that. I was also speaking to adults with food allergies, since they provide their own care and are often alone when it strikes. The information made a world of difference for my self-care and may for others.

Posted on: Thu, 09/18/2003 - 7:33am
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Oh no, I was not offended. I'm sorry if you got that impression. I understand your information about the antihistamines and I thank you for it.
I'm sorry if you thought I was offended. I'm fine. It's been tough sending DS off to college and I am so glad at how well it's turned out.
Any information we can share is important information.
Peggy

Posted on: Thu, 11/20/2003 - 1:10am
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Quote:Originally posted by tando:
[b]Hi Peg,
This isn't a direct answer, but might be helpful for your son. After the hoopla about PB not causing contact reactions in the press this summer, I asked out allergist about it. He explained that there's contact and there's contact. For example, in the tests described (Choguy wrote a great description and rebuttal of the tests in research)-- the contact and inhalation were actually tiny exposures for a very brief amount of time. Our allegist compared this to a preschooler with arms covered with PB for a longer time while making a PB birdfeeder. Different variable amounts, much more likely reaction.
If your son think's in terms of black and white, perhaps it would help him to think in terms of variables in an equation.
What's the allergen form
Likelihood of exposing him to proteins
How much exposure
To what part of his body
How long
Then he can consider the cumulative impact of those variables.
T.[/b]
Tando,
I don't remember if I continuted to tell you how this suggestion of yours impacted my son at college. I printed out your variables and he thought about this for awhile, turned to me and said "Makes sense mom."
I saw this giant light bulb go on and I believe your suggestion is 100% responsible for my son taking the big step to just go and eat in the cafeteria.
At first he was tentative and he is still extremely cautious but he has never had to ask anyone for help getting his food. He just walks past that VAT of PB and watches carefully what he is choosing.
He is eating well balanced and fun meals. Something we did not think was possible. He is sitting and laughing and eating with friends, another thing we worried about.
He has also somehow avoided the "Freshman 15" and looks better than ever!
Thanks again Tando for this one very very important and useful piece of advice. Tailored especially to the way my son thinks and so very effective.
Peggy

Posted on: Fri, 02/04/2005 - 2:33am
Peg541's picture
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Joined: 12/29/2002 - 09:00

re raising.
Peg

Posted on: Fri, 02/04/2005 - 4:20am
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Peg, I know there have been some concerns about the cafeteria, but I was wondering, has your son had any airborne/contact reactions while at school? (I hope not)
If he has, are they still *benedryl* reactions? (meaning, not life threatening - and i hope so)
Although I chose not to eat in any public places, I do think your son's experiences and you posting them here help a lot of people. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 02/04/2005 - 4:48am
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Luckily my son is part of a smaller college within an already small college. The community he belongs to has their own dorms and mostly their own classes. It was set up by a bunch of hippies and free thinkers in the 60's and really befits a student interested in more creative less scientific pursuits.
So since he is part of a small community they banned peanuts from the two dorms associated with his program. One big problem solved. We did not ask for this ban but they met as a community before DS started and decided as a community to ban peanuts.
At the beginning of each new semester DS makes a presentation in each class about his PA so if there are any students not from his community there, or anyone who needs a reminder, they know to not bring peanut products into class. Kids eat an amazing array of foods during college classes!
The food service manager is (finally) eliminating peanuts from his stir fry and recipes. They will leave the vat of PB and the dessert table will stay but nothing else in the cafeteria will contain peanuts. Again, we did not ask for this but it is really a good idea since peanuts are not an integral part of cooking.
Nope, no reactions. A few scares when he found himself standing next to a bowl of crushed peanuts on the food line, and he's left the cafeteria a few times when the smell in the air is questionable but no reactions.
All of the above is I believe a wonderful side effect of attending a small University. We kept DS in small private schools his entire school career so that made it easier for us to get our point across and get cooperation.
DS has been to restaurants in the community surrounding his school and has done well also. He met a waitress with an anaphylactic allergy to ? maybe shellfish and she keeps an eye out for DS when he is in her diner.
Plus he's so careful, so very careful.
Peg

Posted on: Fri, 02/04/2005 - 6:05am
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Joined: 06/13/2003 - 09:00

Hi Peg,
I must have missed your reply so long ago. I'm glad I was able to help your son. I really appreciate your posts. Hearing about your family's experiences and those of other adults with PA have helped me keep this allergy in perspective as just another part of my families life.
Thanks again.
T.

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