Wow, you all should move to my son\'s school

Posted on: Tue, 08/17/2004 - 9:26am
smartalyk's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2004 - 09:00

Had a meeting with the principal this morning. Went in prepared with a Proposed Allergy Management Plan (thanks for the outline Alternative to Mainstream [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] ), a Severe Allergy Action Plan (signed by the allergist), some samples of letters to the parents, info on Epi-Pens, etc.

Wow! He said that they are willing to do whatever is necessary to keep my son safe, whatever measures I feel are necessary, afterall it is my son's life to protect. He suggested that the whole school be peanut/nut free. He asked if we should have signs on the playground stating that no food is to be eaten on the schoolgrounds. He thanked me for doing so much homework with all the information I brought.

I was expecting a bit of a fight I think. I am very relieved today. (And feeling empathetic for those of you struggling with schools...)

My question for you, what do you think of posting signs on the playground about no peanuts/ nuts or no food allowed?

Pros... good reminder for the kids and perhaps other moms that bring their children after hours would find out they don't allow food on the equipment.

Cons... I keep thinking that it is setting up the school for vandalism... I picture some rebellious teens smearing peanut butter over all the equipment. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] Is that just my overworked mind overreacting?

What do you think? Good idea or not?

Thanks!

Posted on: Tue, 08/17/2004 - 12:32pm
California Mom's picture
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Joined: 07/14/2000 - 09:00

Your principal sounds like a gem. I hope he will stick with what he has said if he gets flack from anyone else in the school community.
You may be right about the signs promoting a sick type of vandalism. Maybe they should just state "no eating" and not specify which foods?
Good luck; it sounds wonderful so far!
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

Posted on: Tue, 08/17/2004 - 9:43pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I would avoid stating specific foods for the reasons mentioned above.
Would prefer a blanket "No Eating" sign as well, although I don't think it will really have a great impact.
We face the same situation because soccer, baseball/softball, day care programs are run at our school year round. Any one with peanut contaminated hands could be playing on the equipment. I am thankful that Ryan prefers playing football or baseball with the boys and tends not to use the equipment.

Posted on: Wed, 08/18/2004 - 2:29am
smartalyk's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2004 - 09:00

I think you are right... the no eating sign is better than a no nuts sign. I do think it will make "Some" difference as moms that bring their young children to the park may respect it. It may even just be a good reminder for those that already know the rule. Our school yard is used on the weekends by soccer teams and other events that aren't school related so hopefully it will be a good tool to inform them.
My principal is a gem, I agree. This is our third year at this school. We have never had anything in writing up until now because our school board is behind in dealing with anaphylaxis (am working on informing them more at the moment). The school has already been peanut/nut free for the K-3 wing so the parents have had time to accept that. He is willing to send out a letter requesting ALL students in the school not bring peanut/nut products now because he realized that all the students share the gym, student center and the library.
I have decided that if this man changes schools in the future, we are following him. And he is not allowed to retire anytime in the next six years...

Posted on: Tue, 08/24/2004 - 3:04pm
smartalyk's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2004 - 09:00

I just wanted to share our good news. There are some educators and principals out there who "get it".
My son's school hired an EA(Educational Assistant) who will work from 10-2:30 daily. She will carry his Epi-Pen outside at both recesses and watch him (yet allowing him freedom to play), she will ensure that the children in his class wash before and after snack and lunch and that all the desks are properly cleaned. She will be available to stay inside with him during said recesses when his EAs(Environmental allergies) are acting up and it is healthier for him to be inside. I am so excited! I had tears of thankfulness today when I found out.
Very relieved and now even looking forward to sending the kids off to school in two more sleeps...

Posted on: Wed, 08/25/2004 - 12:00pm
kkeene's picture
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Joined: 10/20/2003 - 09:00

smartalyk--Where does your child go to school?
I do hope our school is like that when we start.

Posted on: Thu, 08/26/2004 - 11:23am
smartalyk's picture
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Joined: 07/20/2004 - 09:00

We are in a city in Saskatchewan, Canada. Not all of the schools in our division are as accomodating, which is why I was so pleasantly surprised. I work at another school in our division, so I know from experience. I do believe that our school would be more accomodating if the PA parents (I know of two) were more informed of their own children's allergies and the risks involved. The parents don't push so there is no need for change so to speak.
I have educated the principal at the school I work at and I do know that she is a very compassionate person. I think that there will be some changes for the better in the school this year to reduce risks for allergic children.
Take care,

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