Wording on medical alert bracelet?

Posted on: Wed, 03/29/2006 - 10:46am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I've decided to get my 2 year old a medical alert bracelet. Here's what I'm thinking of putting on it.

PEANUTALLERGY
USE EPI-PEN
GIVE BENADRYL
911, SEE BACK

DEVIN XXXXXXX
CARRIES MEDICINES,
INSTRUCTIONS, &
CONTACT INFO.

Is it obvious that the 2 year old doesn't have the medicines actually on his body, but that the adult with him has them in a diaper bag or fanny pack?

Obviously it's hard for us to think like people who know nothing about anaphylaxis, but how does the wording on the bracelet sound?

DH and I have decided not to use a company that lists an 800# on it. We're afraid that someone would call the 800# before administering medical treatment or calling 911. To fit max. info., I would like engraving on both sides. The best I've seen is HAH Originals' junior medical ID bracelet(thanks to someone on this site for recommending it!). It allows on the front 13 characters/line, up to 4 lines. On the back, you get 19 characters/line, up to 4 lines.

Thanks for offering feedback on this important decision!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 12:54am
notnutty's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

We too have struggled with the wording on my pa ds's bracelet. We have gone with less wording, with the mindset that it will not confuse anyone. I think you will find lots of opinions about this, in the end you are the one who has to be comfortable with what is written.
We decided on:
Severe Peanut Allergy
Needs EpiPen
Call 911
If you do a search on the Board you will find many discussions regarding the wording on a medical alert bracelet.
Good luck with your decision!
Donna

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:28am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

The only thing I would NEVER put in engraving is my child's name.
Experts strongly discourage personalized clothing or jewelry as this can allow strangers to use the child's name. Very dangerous, since with young children this lends authenticity to claims that the person knows you or other adults in your family.
This is one reason (personally) why we like MedicAlert. There is no personal information at all on my DD's bracelet, but EMT's have access to it with a phone call.
But we've been called paranoid, too, so you should bear that in mind, I suppose. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom, thanks for raising this point. We thought about this issue and reached the conclusion that it was OK to put his name on the back of the bracelet. I don't see how a stranger could use that to lure him in. Weighing pros and cons, it seemed helpful to have the name on there for ID reasons (if he got lost, for example). I hear you about the advantages of MedicAlert. For me, the disadvantage outweighed the advantage. DH and I feel strongly that we don't want an 800# on there because it could delay treatment and calling 911.
I appreciate your feedback!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 6:18am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

My feedback too?
Get medic alert. Period. Nothing else.
They'll work with you to get the most of the wording.
Annual fee and registration et al are all reimbuseable thru a flexible spending account [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I defer to the rest. They're #1 IMO.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 10:33am
Timmysmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/16/2003 - 09:00

I totally disagree about NOT putting your child's name on the bracelet. I understand the point of not wanting personalization on clothing, backpacks, etc. because of stranger danger. A stranger cannot see your childs' name from his or her bracelet unless they are actually holding your child's hand and reading the bracelet up close. My feeling is, someday when my child becomes a teenager and is out of the house doing what teenagers do on their own, God forbid something happen and no one knows who he is. That's just my opinion.
My son's bracelet includes his name, severe peanut allergy, use Epi-Pen, call 911 and our home phone number.

Posted on: Wed, 08/09/2006 - 1:27am
saknjmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

re raising

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 12:54am
notnutty's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

We too have struggled with the wording on my pa ds's bracelet. We have gone with less wording, with the mindset that it will not confuse anyone. I think you will find lots of opinions about this, in the end you are the one who has to be comfortable with what is written.
We decided on:
Severe Peanut Allergy
Needs EpiPen
Call 911
If you do a search on the Board you will find many discussions regarding the wording on a medical alert bracelet.
Good luck with your decision!
Donna

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:28am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

The only thing I would NEVER put in engraving is my child's name.
Experts strongly discourage personalized clothing or jewelry as this can allow strangers to use the child's name. Very dangerous, since with young children this lends authenticity to claims that the person knows you or other adults in your family.
This is one reason (personally) why we like MedicAlert. There is no personal information at all on my DD's bracelet, but EMT's have access to it with a phone call.
But we've been called paranoid, too, so you should bear that in mind, I suppose. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom, thanks for raising this point. We thought about this issue and reached the conclusion that it was OK to put his name on the back of the bracelet. I don't see how a stranger could use that to lure him in. Weighing pros and cons, it seemed helpful to have the name on there for ID reasons (if he got lost, for example). I hear you about the advantages of MedicAlert. For me, the disadvantage outweighed the advantage. DH and I feel strongly that we don't want an 800# on there because it could delay treatment and calling 911.
I appreciate your feedback!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 6:18am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

My feedback too?
Get medic alert. Period. Nothing else.
They'll work with you to get the most of the wording.
Annual fee and registration et al are all reimbuseable thru a flexible spending account [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I defer to the rest. They're #1 IMO.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 10:33am
Timmysmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/16/2003 - 09:00

I totally disagree about NOT putting your child's name on the bracelet. I understand the point of not wanting personalization on clothing, backpacks, etc. because of stranger danger. A stranger cannot see your childs' name from his or her bracelet unless they are actually holding your child's hand and reading the bracelet up close. My feeling is, someday when my child becomes a teenager and is out of the house doing what teenagers do on their own, God forbid something happen and no one knows who he is. That's just my opinion.
My son's bracelet includes his name, severe peanut allergy, use Epi-Pen, call 911 and our home phone number.

Posted on: Wed, 08/09/2006 - 1:27am
saknjmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

re raising

More Community Posts

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

create a new community post
Displaying 1 - 20 of 20
Latest Post by latamdatelhh Thu, 09/19/2019 - 11:45pm
Comments: 0
Latest Post by blprestangen Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:06pm
Comments: 12
Latest Post by mom2two Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:03pm
Comments: 18
Latest Post by Kathryn Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:02pm
Comments: 7
Latest Post by TheDaddy Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:01pm
Comments: 9
Latest Post by desmond Mon, 09/16/2019 - 1:00pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by desmond Mon, 09/16/2019 - 12:58pm
Comments: 19
Latest Post by desmond Mon, 09/16/2019 - 12:55pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by TeddyCan Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:32pm
Comments: 10
Latest Post by DTurner Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:31pm
Comments: 5
Latest Post by B.M.18 Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:30pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by abolitionist146 Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:28pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by nutfreenyc Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:19pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by AllergicTeen2 Mon, 09/09/2019 - 4:18pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by PeanutAllergy.com Fri, 09/06/2019 - 1:52pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by mom1995 Fri, 09/06/2019 - 1:52pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by mom1995 Fri, 09/06/2019 - 1:52pm
Comments: 35
Latest Post by PeanutAllergy.com Fri, 09/06/2019 - 1:52pm
Comments: 2

More Articles

If you have a mold allergy, you’ve likely been advised to remove all sources of mold from in and around your house. But it doesn’t stop there....

You may be surprised to find that peanut butter is used to make many products. Someone who has a peanut...

What if, while attending a summertime family picnic, a food-allergic child shows signs of anaphylaxis. In a panicked instant, adults realize the...

Are the signs of nut allergies different than those of peanut allergies? Many people who have an allergic reaction after eating a peanut butter...

There is much buzz in the news about the potential health benefits of fecal transplants, and some of that benefit may extend to people with food...

More Articles

More Articles

If you or your child has a food allergy, a doctor or allergist might have talked to you about “co-factors.” Allergy co-factors are substances,...

An epinephrine auto-injector provides an emergency dose of epinephrine (adrenaline) to treat life-threatening allergic reactions. Those who have...

Oyster sauce is used for a variety of recipes, including as an earthy dressing for noodles, vegetables, and stir-fries, or as a base for other...

The high incidence of food allergy in children, and the reason many kids eventually...

Parents of children with food allergies often share tips about safe foods, allergy-friendly restaurants, and other experiences and challenges of...

Because food allergies are so common among children today, a great idea for sharing information with other classmates is to incorporate the topic...

When a child is diagnosed with peanut allergy, the implications ripple past the parents to rattle the rest of us - older siblings, grandparents,...

Your best defense against anaphylactic shock is to know what you’re up against. Anaphylaxis is a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction....

Inhalers Sometimes Contain Soy

Many people use inhalers to take the drug albuterol to help their asthma or allergies, and those with COPD...

Some people with shellfish allergy have concerns about consuming sea salt that might be contaminated with traces of shellfish. Though there are...

Nearly 25 percent of children with a peanut allergy will outgrow it. However, there is a small risk...

Many people managing food allergies understand that allergy is an immune system response to a specific food. What people may not realize is that...

Salmonella Is One of the Most Common Types of Food Poisoning

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, Salmonella enterocolitis...

Heading into spring and Allergy and Asthma Awareness month, many people load up on antihistamines and get their inhaler prescriptions renewed. A...