Wording on medical alert bracelet?

Posted on: Wed, 03/29/2006 - 10:46am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I've decided to get my 2 year old a medical alert bracelet. Here's what I'm thinking of putting on it.

PEANUTALLERGY
USE EPI-PEN
GIVE BENADRYL
911, SEE BACK

DEVIN XXXXXXX
CARRIES MEDICINES,
INSTRUCTIONS, &
CONTACT INFO.

Is it obvious that the 2 year old doesn't have the medicines actually on his body, but that the adult with him has them in a diaper bag or fanny pack?

Obviously it's hard for us to think like people who know nothing about anaphylaxis, but how does the wording on the bracelet sound?

DH and I have decided not to use a company that lists an 800# on it. We're afraid that someone would call the 800# before administering medical treatment or calling 911. To fit max. info., I would like engraving on both sides. The best I've seen is HAH Originals' junior medical ID bracelet(thanks to someone on this site for recommending it!). It allows on the front 13 characters/line, up to 4 lines. On the back, you get 19 characters/line, up to 4 lines.

Thanks for offering feedback on this important decision!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 12:54am
notnutty's picture
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Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

We too have struggled with the wording on my pa ds's bracelet. We have gone with less wording, with the mindset that it will not confuse anyone. I think you will find lots of opinions about this, in the end you are the one who has to be comfortable with what is written.
We decided on:
Severe Peanut Allergy
Needs EpiPen
Call 911
If you do a search on the Board you will find many discussions regarding the wording on a medical alert bracelet.
Good luck with your decision!
Donna

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:28am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

The only thing I would NEVER put in engraving is my child's name.
Experts strongly discourage personalized clothing or jewelry as this can allow strangers to use the child's name. Very dangerous, since with young children this lends authenticity to claims that the person knows you or other adults in your family.
This is one reason (personally) why we like MedicAlert. There is no personal information at all on my DD's bracelet, but EMT's have access to it with a phone call.
But we've been called paranoid, too, so you should bear that in mind, I suppose. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom, thanks for raising this point. We thought about this issue and reached the conclusion that it was OK to put his name on the back of the bracelet. I don't see how a stranger could use that to lure him in. Weighing pros and cons, it seemed helpful to have the name on there for ID reasons (if he got lost, for example). I hear you about the advantages of MedicAlert. For me, the disadvantage outweighed the advantage. DH and I feel strongly that we don't want an 800# on there because it could delay treatment and calling 911.
I appreciate your feedback!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 6:18am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

My feedback too?
Get medic alert. Period. Nothing else.
They'll work with you to get the most of the wording.
Annual fee and registration et al are all reimbuseable thru a flexible spending account [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I defer to the rest. They're #1 IMO.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 10:33am
Timmysmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/16/2003 - 09:00

I totally disagree about NOT putting your child's name on the bracelet. I understand the point of not wanting personalization on clothing, backpacks, etc. because of stranger danger. A stranger cannot see your childs' name from his or her bracelet unless they are actually holding your child's hand and reading the bracelet up close. My feeling is, someday when my child becomes a teenager and is out of the house doing what teenagers do on their own, God forbid something happen and no one knows who he is. That's just my opinion.
My son's bracelet includes his name, severe peanut allergy, use Epi-Pen, call 911 and our home phone number.

Posted on: Wed, 08/09/2006 - 1:27am
saknjmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/02/2003 - 09:00

re raising

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 12:54am
notnutty's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/15/2004 - 09:00

We too have struggled with the wording on my pa ds's bracelet. We have gone with less wording, with the mindset that it will not confuse anyone. I think you will find lots of opinions about this, in the end you are the one who has to be comfortable with what is written.
We decided on:
Severe Peanut Allergy
Needs EpiPen
Call 911
If you do a search on the Board you will find many discussions regarding the wording on a medical alert bracelet.
Good luck with your decision!
Donna

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:28am
Corvallis Mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

The only thing I would NEVER put in engraving is my child's name.
Experts strongly discourage personalized clothing or jewelry as this can allow strangers to use the child's name. Very dangerous, since with young children this lends authenticity to claims that the person knows you or other adults in your family.
This is one reason (personally) why we like MedicAlert. There is no personal information at all on my DD's bracelet, but EMT's have access to it with a phone call.
But we've been called paranoid, too, so you should bear that in mind, I suppose. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 5:43am
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Corvallis Mom, thanks for raising this point. We thought about this issue and reached the conclusion that it was OK to put his name on the back of the bracelet. I don't see how a stranger could use that to lure him in. Weighing pros and cons, it seemed helpful to have the name on there for ID reasons (if he got lost, for example). I hear you about the advantages of MedicAlert. For me, the disadvantage outweighed the advantage. DH and I feel strongly that we don't want an 800# on there because it could delay treatment and calling 911.
I appreciate your feedback!

Posted on: Thu, 03/30/2006 - 6:18am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

My feedback too?
Get medic alert. Period. Nothing else.
They'll work with you to get the most of the wording.
Annual fee and registration et al are all reimbuseable thru a flexible spending account [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I defer to the rest. They're #1 IMO.
Jason
------------------
[b]* Obsessed * [/b]

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