Why bother with the Nut Free signs??

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I have had it! Why bother having a nut free policy, if they don't adhere to it? It's actually my 7 yr old's teacher I have issues with. She herself has has allergies, so I figured she, of all people, would be very concerned with keeping the environment safe.

One mother brought in a birthday cake that had almonds, and the teacher allowed it to be served. All the kids ate cake while my son sat there with nothing. She handed out chocolates last week after a spelling test, but my son couldn't have one, because she was unsure of the ingredients.

Today, a boy brought in a chocolate for lunch that had traces of nuts. The teacher said he could have it, as long as he washed his hands afterwards. My son pointed to the sign SHE put up in the classroom regarding it being a nut free zone, and she said it was ok to eat the chocolate if the boy washed his hands and didn't touch my son.

I have had it with her. I really didn't want to make waves, but this woman is being totally irresponsible. My son is being left out, and it hurts me to hear that. I see no point in talking to her, since she never replies to messages. If I talk to the principal, I'm afraid his teacher will end up resenting my son and will start being less friendly towards him. I really hate confrontations, but I have to keep reminding myself that as his mother, I have to fight for his rights.

On Jan 27, 2003

You can't ignore this. Talk to her face to face and document while you talk, if she doesn't smarten up, go to the principal. Who cares if she's not nice to your son if she sends him to the hospital or worse. You are your sons advocate and ally. Good Luck

------------------ Cynde

On Jan 27, 2003

Thanks, Cynde. I am making an appointment with the principal tomorrow. I won't even bother with his teacher, because I have written several letters to her which she never replied to, and left a voicemail regarding my concerns about my son's vision, and I she never called back. She also totally ignored my husband and I on parent-teacher interview night. I've given up on getting any answers from her.

Thanks for your input!

Karen

On Jan 27, 2003

I have had similar problems with the "nut free" signs. We have finally agreed (after strong urging) to either enforce the signs or change them to "peanut aware zone". Our comfort zone is actually pretty large and we are ok with the may contains in the classroom.

A few ideas for you to consider: I keep some safe "goodies" in the classroom in case a "may contain" or questionable item is brought in. If we run out of "goodies" ds is allowed to go to the cafeteria and get something - fruit or other safe item.

as far as the teacher, I would suggest you skip the teacher and go to the pricipal. if nothing changes quickly - go to the superintendent. I tried to work with the school teachers & nurse, got frustrated, to the principal - not much better. Called the superintendent and she accomplished in 2 days what I couldn't do in 3 years. I also told her my concerns with reprocussions from the school level so she keeps her eyes open and asked me to contact her if we think he is being excluded.

Things are still not perfect but getting better now that the super is involved.

On Jan 27, 2003

The reason I said go to the teacher is because in our district there is a strict "chain of command" and the principal will not discuss a problem with a teacher unless the parent has met (face to face) with the teacher and is still not satisfied. If the teacher refuses a face to face meeting document that and meet with the principal. You should also document your meeting with the principal just in case you do need to go to the superintendant. Don't hesitate to go over somebodies head, as mchammond said they can accomplish a lot quickly. Good luck.

------------------ Cynde

On Jan 27, 2003

I also have a very open comfort zone, but I do worry about the children who are peanut allergic in the school. I think about the doorknob or desk that the child could touch before washing his hands, and think about a peanut allergic child reacting.

I actually wanted to speak to the principal about an upcoming conern. The school is having a cake-a-rama on Valentine's Day. People are asked to donate cakes to the school, and kids get to buy raffle tickets. The cakes are then handed out as prizes for the kids to take home. Now I know that many parents will not think twice about sending in cakes with nuts, and highly doubt that the nut police will be checking them out before accepting them. I hate the thought that the allergic kids can't participate. I feel so strongly about it, that I am considering keeping him home that day, and I have never done something like that before.

Why on earth do schools rely so heavily on food for fundraisers and rewards? It's very frustrating.

Karen

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