WHEN YOUR CHILD WAS SMALL DID HE/SHE SNIFF FOOD AND THEN REFUSE IT?

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HELLO JUST REASURE ME THAT WILLIAMS HABIT OF SNIFFING ALL FOODS BEFORE HE EATS IT IS NORMAL, NOT JUST BECAUSE HE MAY HAVE A CLOSER LINK TO OUR APE PAST THAN MY OTHER CHILDREN. HE HAS ALWAYS REFUSED FOOD THAT CONTAINS PULSES AND I ASSUMED THAT MAY BE BECAUSE HE CAN SMELL DANGER IN A FOOD. AM I CORRECT? DOES ANYONE ELSE NOTICE THIS IN THEIR CHILDREN AND ADULTS WITH PA DO YOU STILL DO THIS? CAN YOU TELL THE DIFFERANCE BY SMELL,JUST INTERESTED,NOT AT ALL CONCERNED AS WILLIAM DOES HAVE THE SKILLS OF A MONKEY AT THE SWING PARK, HA, HA, THANKS

On Apr 14, 2001

Hi! While Matt hasn't ever sniffed foods before trying them, he has totally refused foods from the very start. I tried last summer to give him watermelon at least a zillion times. No matter how much I tried to convince him that was yummy, he wouldn't touch the stuff. Carrots he would take a bite, chew it a time or two and then spit it out. Peanut butter he would touch to his mouth and then throw across the room. He had allergy testing for the first time in Jan. He's allergic to all three. (I knew about the peanuts, though, they were why we were at the allergist's!)

On Apr 14, 2001

I do buy into the theory that allergic kids often just KNOW what they can't have, but I'll confess that we're not a good example of that. Isaac (15 months) often sniffs and refuses or takes a bite and spits out, but he does this with foods he's not allergic to, as well. So now I think it may just be that our allergic kids are often picky eaters. Who knows....

Miriam

On Apr 14, 2001

I am an adult PA/TNA person, and I have always sniffed my foods, but of course I do so now in a more surreptitious manner. Several foods which I refused to eat as a child and young adult have ended up being foods to which I am allergic. In my family, I am known as the pickiest eater in the world, but they put up with it.

I only forced one thing on my daughter when she was young -- strawberry pie which I had labored hard to make. And she broke out in hives. Was I ever ashamed. Never did that again.

WoozerMom

On Apr 14, 2001

My son has been spared many reactions due to smelling all foods. One time when he was in the nursery at church they gave the kids cookies (before I knew of the PA). He absolutely refused to eat it because he smelled it and said it has peanuts in it...sure enough there was.

He has always refused many foods (some due to pickiness). He refuses to eat watermellon, strawberries, salads (weird kid), and oranges (orange juice). He also detests spicy foods but his younger brother loves them.

I plan on mentioning it to the allergist when we take him in two weeks. It is reassuring that my son is not the only food sniffing person around. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Apr 14, 2001

My son doesn't sniff that I noticed but certainly seems to have a sense of things that he shouldn't eat. I trust him and never force foods on him.

On Apr 14, 2001

My daughter will be 7 years old in May and she has always sniffed food.

She is pretty good about trying new things, but she will sniff it first. She will often refuse a food after she sniffs it. I find it funny that someone else thought about the "animal instinct" because when I watch her sniff food that's what I think about.

Sue in Sunny Arizona

On Apr 15, 2001

I'm not allergic to any food and I sniff food before I try it! If I don't like the smell, I won't like the taste. Simple as that. I'm a picky eater. Interestingly, my husband will eat just about anything, but loves to add tobasco sauce or red pepper flakes. He also has no sense of smell. He can't smell a dirty diaper in the same room, when I can smell it across the house. I think picky eaters are picky because we taste and smell things more intensely.

On Apr 16, 2001

Funny you mention that! The one and only time I offered my son peanut butter, it was on crackers and he was about 20 months old. He sniffed it, refused it and pushed the plate away. So of course what did I do? Beg him to try it. Well thank god he didn't. He never had a reaction to peanuts since he never ate it but I had him at the allergist since I suspected a milk allergy. The allergist tested him for milk and "while we're at it lets test him for other common allergies." BINGO! On a scale of 0 to 4+ my son was a 2+ for the milk and a 4++ on the peanuts!! Who knew! Body's self defense mechanism kicking in. Moral of this story, never force a kid to eat something that they outright refuse and let them sniff away!!

On Apr 17, 2001

BCUZILUVHIM, has your son ever reacted to peanuts? Has he ever accidentally had them? I ask because Ben also never reacted, but tested 4+ or 4++. Your son is 8 right? Does he still test positive? Ben also refused peanutbutter, but did get some on his lip or tongue and ate products with peanut flour, or that had come in contact with peanuts.

On Apr 17, 2001

I couldn't believe this when I read it! My PA 6 yr old ALWAYS smelled her bottle (after breastfeeding) and everything she ever drank. I just thought it was cute. Now I think it is nature's way of protecting her. She DOES have a rather accute sense of smell. Arlene

On Apr 17, 2001

This is too weird. I feel like I could have written a lot of these posts. My son Andrew always sniffed his food when he was a baby. I really agree that it is a built in defense mechanism.

When he was only a little over 3 years old, the babysitter's hubby gave Andrew a peanut butter cracker. Andrew just nibbled the tiniest bit on the end...maybe even just licked it.....Mind you, he was hardly ever around peanut butter....But Andrew had the good sense to run to the babysitter and tell her he had just eaten peanut butter. I often feel the angels must have been looking out for him. The babysitter was panic stricken. Luckily, just then my husband showed up, and he took Andrew to the emergency room just in case.

Tell you the truth, I never saw any hives on Andrew in this particular case(he has had a severe reaction in the past), but my hubby did. To this day I don't know if I was underreacting or my hubby was overreacting!

But anyway, Andrew was ok. We kept him in the emergency room for an hour or two to monitor him....But I have often wondered...Does he have a built in sixth sense? OR were we just plain lucky that time? Maybe a bit of both.

Sorry so rambly!

Andrew's Mom

On Apr 17, 2001

Hi Bensmom! Michael is 8 1/2. He was diagnosed at 2 1/2 as a second thought since he was at the allergist for a possible milk allergy. He never ate pb or pn. He had M&M plain rarely (my mom god rest her soul would sneak them to him and I would yell at her to stop giving him sweets not knowing his PA. Who knows maybe I had a maternal instinct that was surfacing!??)At 4 yrs old, He had an accidental exposure at Nursery school. They gave him a jelly sandwich and they used the same knife from the pb, only wiped it off they knew of his pa and they thought that was enough (DUH!) I always sent his lunch he asked for an extra sandwich. Took 3 days for the swelling in his face, eyes and hands to go away. He was on steroids for a week. (He looked like a bullfrog!) In 6 years only one reaction. I didn't find out the hard way like many of you. I can thank god everyday that we found out before hand and not after a tragedy. Took me a long time to grasp it. I still have trouble sometimes because I never saw him eat pb and have a reaction so it is easy for my to deny it. Then I remember what his face and hands looked like at 4 yrs old. Eventhough I did not see him eat it, it was obvious it was real. The only way that I would truly know how he reacts is to give him a food challenge. You could put 10 loaded guns to my head and I would never do that!!!!! And yes I had him re-tested on 9/30/97...4++ still. My new allergist said that there is no point in testing him again right now since it is obvious that he is severely allergic. Just a side note. Michael is 8 and the size of a 10year old in height and weight and is a straight A student. His PA does not hinder him in anyway and we try to make his life as normal as possible and we try not to put emphasis on food so that if he cannot have something its' not really too big of a deal. Gets easier as they get older. Thanks for asking and God bless!

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