When to worry about vomiting?

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 11:02am
Flounder's picture
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[This message has been edited by Flounder (edited January 08, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 11:52am
mommamia8's picture
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Joined: 11/13/2005 - 09:00

10 day old twins and 2 other children? Wow, you have your hands full! And I get stressed with one! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I would say no to your question. My ds is almost 3 and PA/TN/Egg/Sesame allergic and has never thrown up (knock on wood). He did spit up a little when young but nothing too major.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 12:03pm
McCobbre's picture
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I do know that children who had/have reflux are more likely to throw up.
And don't get me going on the reflux/pa thing, but there's a potential medicine link there.
But I wouldn't say I've seen anything that would lead me to think there's a direct relation between pa and throwing up easily.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 2:03pm
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lj
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Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

My PA/TNA son is very prone to motion sickness. But, I don't think it's connected to FA.
He can throw up from swinging on the swing in our yard, riding in the car, going on the "teacup" ride at the fair, etc. And, this started at about 1 year of age. He never threw up as an infant. No spitting up at all. Now, my 2 year old was a constant spitter-upper, and has showed no signs of motion sickness. We do not know about FA with him yet.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 2:54pm
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[This message has been edited by Flounder (edited January 08, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 6:50pm
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A couple of items made my son R throw up immediately (he is PA, ana dairy, eggs, nuts, multiple FA, EA, asthma, eczema). He is very reactive. I once gave him some pumpkin seeds - immediately vomitted, same with another sort of seed.
To be honest I think this is good - it gets the offending substance out of their body quickly. I was horrified at the time - felt like I had poisoned him or something but it was nice to see his body react like that to something dangerous to him. Saying that he never vomitted when he had his first and only exposure to dairy.
Barb

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 8:24pm
mommyofmatt's picture
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Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Siobhan,
My first thought is reflux too. One of my twins had it (one with NKA), and in fact still does.
Many infants have it, and for most it goes away between 9-18 mos. Question for you: are they on formula? If so, you might want to talk to your pediatrician about changing formulas. We ended up on a hypoallergenic one, it made all the difference.
My guy has also been on and off reflux meds since he was born, tests negative for PA, although has never eaten anything with nuts at this point.
I remember seeing some threads on reflux meds and PA or FA somewhere...it just didn't apply to us. If I remember correctly (?) there were some theories that reflux meds may cause food allergies...is that right McCobbre?
My guy with food allergies has never been on reflux meds, FWIW.
If you think it's a whole lot of spitting up, I'd ask your pediatrician about it and mention reflux. Mine was hesitant to diagnose, but after a formula change and meds he was a different kid [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Meg

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 9:51pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My PA DS threw up a lot as a baby. A LOT. He never was on reflux meds. I think it was that I didn't know he was PA, and I was eating PB. When he threw up, it was always right after nursing.
Now, he never throws up. He's 8, and has had one stomach bug in his life, doesn't get motion sickness.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 10:51pm
ajas_folks's picture
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Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

We've had 2 allergists tell us that, for severely food allergic, vomiting could be body's protection way of instantly expelling the allergen.
~Elizabeth

Posted on: Mon, 09/25/2006 - 10:11pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Well, he didn't succeed, but DS tried to make himself throw up this morning. He stuck a long thin toy down his throat while I was in the shower. Last night, after bedtime, he told me he felt like he was going to throw up. He seemed to cheerful to feel that bad, but just in case, I gave him a throw-up bowl and put a towel under his head. He's obviously trying to avoid school today. When I asked him about it, he cried. The story he finally told me was that he's getting too much work. I'm not sure that's the whole story (or even the story at all), but there was little time to discuss it, since the school bus was coming. I left a message for his teacher, so hopefully we'll all be able to work this out together.

Posted on: Mon, 09/25/2006 - 10:23pm
nopeanuts's picture
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Joined: 06/20/2001 - 09:00

I have 2 kids with MFA. One of them used to throw up all the time until we found out all his allergies, the other one throws up all the time, despite limiting all his allergic food. We have come to realize that the throwing up happens because of a combination of a strong gag reflex, reflux, seasonal allergies, and asthma. The asthma diagnosis and connection to throwing up is new and we started him on singulair, and that has actually helped the throwing up (the logic was that he has a lot of mucus in his lungs and it causes him to gag and then throw up). All that said, I think that some kids just have reflux and throw up a lot, especially a newborn.

Posted on: Tue, 09/26/2006 - 12:44pm
Daisy's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Flounder,
I have GI allergies, which have, in recent years become anaphylactic. As a child, my Mom said I was colicky, starting about the same time foods were introduced. DUH! (She breastfed for several months, then started cereals and such about 4 months.)
All through my childhood, I remember feeling nauseated and vomiting frequently. I did not have hives at that time, but always a runny nose, sinus infections, many bouts of strep throat, and extremely itchy skin.
Into my high school years, I developed more diarrhea instead of vomiting so much. In college, it was called IBS.
Finally a good GI-Doc sent me to an allergist (in my 30's). He did SPT testing and Dx'd allergic gastroenteritis. He said the symptoms I had as a child were "classic" of GI food allergy, and could not understand why I was not put on an elimination diet as a child. He said I probably would have outgrown many of my allergens, had my body been given some time to heal.
Hope this helps,
Daisy

Posted on: Wed, 09/27/2006 - 12:57pm
Flounder's picture
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Joined: 09/02/2006 - 09:00

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[This message has been edited by Flounder (edited January 08, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 11:52am
mommamia8's picture
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Joined: 11/13/2005 - 09:00

10 day old twins and 2 other children? Wow, you have your hands full! And I get stressed with one! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I would say no to your question. My ds is almost 3 and PA/TN/Egg/Sesame allergic and has never thrown up (knock on wood). He did spit up a little when young but nothing too major.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 12:03pm
McCobbre's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

I do know that children who had/have reflux are more likely to throw up.
And don't get me going on the reflux/pa thing, but there's a potential medicine link there.
But I wouldn't say I've seen anything that would lead me to think there's a direct relation between pa and throwing up easily.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 2:03pm
lj's picture
lj
Offline
Joined: 01/26/2006 - 09:00

My PA/TNA son is very prone to motion sickness. But, I don't think it's connected to FA.
He can throw up from swinging on the swing in our yard, riding in the car, going on the "teacup" ride at the fair, etc. And, this started at about 1 year of age. He never threw up as an infant. No spitting up at all. Now, my 2 year old was a constant spitter-upper, and has showed no signs of motion sickness. We do not know about FA with him yet.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 2:54pm
Flounder's picture
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Joined: 09/02/2006 - 09:00

.
[This message has been edited by Flounder (edited January 08, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 6:50pm
barb1123's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/08/2000 - 09:00

A couple of items made my son R throw up immediately (he is PA, ana dairy, eggs, nuts, multiple FA, EA, asthma, eczema). He is very reactive. I once gave him some pumpkin seeds - immediately vomitted, same with another sort of seed.
To be honest I think this is good - it gets the offending substance out of their body quickly. I was horrified at the time - felt like I had poisoned him or something but it was nice to see his body react like that to something dangerous to him. Saying that he never vomitted when he had his first and only exposure to dairy.
Barb

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 8:24pm
mommyofmatt's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/12/2004 - 09:00

Siobhan,
My first thought is reflux too. One of my twins had it (one with NKA), and in fact still does.
Many infants have it, and for most it goes away between 9-18 mos. Question for you: are they on formula? If so, you might want to talk to your pediatrician about changing formulas. We ended up on a hypoallergenic one, it made all the difference.
My guy has also been on and off reflux meds since he was born, tests negative for PA, although has never eaten anything with nuts at this point.
I remember seeing some threads on reflux meds and PA or FA somewhere...it just didn't apply to us. If I remember correctly (?) there were some theories that reflux meds may cause food allergies...is that right McCobbre?
My guy with food allergies has never been on reflux meds, FWIW.
If you think it's a whole lot of spitting up, I'd ask your pediatrician about it and mention reflux. Mine was hesitant to diagnose, but after a formula change and meds he was a different kid [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Meg

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 9:51pm
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

My PA DS threw up a lot as a baby. A LOT. He never was on reflux meds. I think it was that I didn't know he was PA, and I was eating PB. When he threw up, it was always right after nursing.
Now, he never throws up. He's 8, and has had one stomach bug in his life, doesn't get motion sickness.

Posted on: Sun, 09/24/2006 - 10:51pm
ajas_folks's picture
Offline
Joined: 04/28/2000 - 09:00

We've had 2 allergists tell us that, for severely food allergic, vomiting could be body's protection way of instantly expelling the allergen.
~Elizabeth

Posted on: Mon, 09/25/2006 - 10:11pm
anonymous's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Well, he didn't succeed, but DS tried to make himself throw up this morning. He stuck a long thin toy down his throat while I was in the shower. Last night, after bedtime, he told me he felt like he was going to throw up. He seemed to cheerful to feel that bad, but just in case, I gave him a throw-up bowl and put a towel under his head. He's obviously trying to avoid school today. When I asked him about it, he cried. The story he finally told me was that he's getting too much work. I'm not sure that's the whole story (or even the story at all), but there was little time to discuss it, since the school bus was coming. I left a message for his teacher, so hopefully we'll all be able to work this out together.

Posted on: Mon, 09/25/2006 - 10:23pm
nopeanuts's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/20/2001 - 09:00

I have 2 kids with MFA. One of them used to throw up all the time until we found out all his allergies, the other one throws up all the time, despite limiting all his allergic food. We have come to realize that the throwing up happens because of a combination of a strong gag reflex, reflux, seasonal allergies, and asthma. The asthma diagnosis and connection to throwing up is new and we started him on singulair, and that has actually helped the throwing up (the logic was that he has a lot of mucus in his lungs and it causes him to gag and then throw up). All that said, I think that some kids just have reflux and throw up a lot, especially a newborn.

Posted on: Tue, 09/26/2006 - 12:44pm
Daisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/16/2006 - 09:00

Flounder,
I have GI allergies, which have, in recent years become anaphylactic. As a child, my Mom said I was colicky, starting about the same time foods were introduced. DUH! (She breastfed for several months, then started cereals and such about 4 months.)
All through my childhood, I remember feeling nauseated and vomiting frequently. I did not have hives at that time, but always a runny nose, sinus infections, many bouts of strep throat, and extremely itchy skin.
Into my high school years, I developed more diarrhea instead of vomiting so much. In college, it was called IBS.
Finally a good GI-Doc sent me to an allergist (in my 30's). He did SPT testing and Dx'd allergic gastroenteritis. He said the symptoms I had as a child were "classic" of GI food allergy, and could not understand why I was not put on an elimination diet as a child. He said I probably would have outgrown many of my allergens, had my body been given some time to heal.
Hope this helps,
Daisy

Posted on: Wed, 09/27/2006 - 12:57pm
Flounder's picture
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Joined: 09/02/2006 - 09:00

.
[This message has been edited by Flounder (edited January 08, 2007).]

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