What should I do?

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Help. We are at such a loss here. My 2.5 yo dd was diagnosed a few weeks ago with an EA and PA. Total elimination. That is actually going well. (not an easy thing, but we're learning!) She also has intolerences to a preservative/additive, maybe one, maybe more. She has had 5 minor reactions in the past week. We thought we had it narrowed down to nitrates, in things like deli hams. Then today at noon it was Mac and cheese- she has never reacted to it before. She also had a reaction at supper tonight. We are getting very frustrated. Last week it was indeed the smoked deli ham and then she actually said her tongue hurt and it was very red around the edges and slightly enlarged, also hives all around her mouth and chin. The last four reactions have not involved the tongue but seem to stick around a lot longer. They used to go away within an hour, now we have noticed patchy skin up to 12-18 hours later. I have been giving her benadryl when I notice the hives. Her reactions had been just once every one or two weeks.

Any thoughts?? and yes I did call her allergist today. He told me to keep a food diary and make an appointment in 2-4 weeks. I'm due with baby #4 on November 15. Great timing.....

Kara

On Oct 26, 2006

What kind of mac n cheese? Homemade or Kraft? One thing I thought of was cross contaminated pasta (Barilla is made on same equip as egg). I know how frustrating it can be, especially dealing with multiple food allergies.

On Oct 26, 2006

My first thought with the deli ham was cross-contamination. If you actually got it out of a deli (instead of packaged), a lot of delis have salads that are made with egg and there's a lunch meat that I can't spell (starts with an M I believe) that has pistachios. Also, some meats "smoked" with hickory may cause a reaction in some tree nut allergic people. Do you know if your child is tree nut allergic?

Also, do you have egg or peanut products in your house still? If so, a reaction could happen from you simply eating something with egg, then making her food without washing your hands, or her touching your table which had something with egg in then sticking her hands in/near her mouth. Quite a few EA/PA people are able to live in houses that have egg and peanut in them, but good cleaning and hand washing must be practiced by everyone in the house.

On Oct 26, 2006

Hi,

How long after eating did the reactions occur? (Something good to make note of in your food diary.)

Was she at your house all day before the reaction, or had you just returned home?

Do you keep her allergens in your house, or have you gone egg/nut-free?

Just brainstorming to try to help. I do react to yellow dyes and sulfites. Kept thinking I had a new food allergy or something.

Take care, Daisy

On Oct 27, 2006

Here a few of the answers to the questions: 1. Kraft mac and cheese. No egg or nut. 2. Yes it was smoked deli ham last week. We don't think she is allergice to tree nuts, but she is not allowed to eat those or shellfish either. 3. I had a post about deli cross contamination. I suppose it is possible at the meijer I go to, but I always use the same deli lady and she knows about our allergies and washes the slicers and hands and puts on new gloves. I do know what meat your talking about but we apparently don't have that around here!! 4. The other deli that I use is a fresh butchers deli. I love it- they have no egg salad (no salads actually) and they also clean the slicer for me. They add nothing to their meats either. 5. yes, we do have some eggs in our house, but I do not use them at all during the day because she reacts very badly especially to raw egg and I'm too nervous to crack an egg around her. My husband eats one once and a while but is very careful. She had a reaction yesterday noon and last night at supper. No cracked egg at noon, but my husband had one at supper. Her reaction had started before he even got the egg out of the fridge. 6. Her reactions start within a minute or two of eating something. I think I covered most of the questions. Believe me, my brain is toast. I'm emotionally very tired of this as it is all consuming. Every meal I find myself watching her face for a reaction. Thanks for the thoughts!! Anymore ideas??????

Kara

I forgot one of the questions: She actually was home all day yesterday. I had been gone, but I was at the doctors and I do wash my hands when I get home. I had not eaten anything either. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by KaraLH (edited October 27, 2006).]

On Oct 27, 2006

I think the food diary is a good idea. Make sure you record the times she eats and the times of reactions as well as all ingredients. (I know it's a big job, we've done this, too.)

My son turned out to be sensitive to yellow dye #5 (tartrazine). Some things for you to consider-- milk allergy, pork allergy, cross-contamination of some kind--cutting boards, cooking utensils such as wooden spoons, colander used to drain macaroni and egg noodles, dishes contaminated in the dishwasher, etc.

My advice to you would be to remove all known allergens from the house, i.e. all egg and peanut containing foods, until you have this figured out. Also, as other posters have said, avoid all deli foods for now. The server is changing gloves and cleaning the slicer for YOU, but not for the person who had a slice off that same ham just before you.

Cathy

------------------ Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

[This message has been edited by Momcat (edited October 27, 2006).]

On Oct 27, 2006

Thanks Cathy. Yes we will be avoiding all deli foods from now on. I actually went to the store this morning and waved at MY "deli lady"! No stop at the counter for us. I have not used an egg since her diagnosis, my husband is the only one to eat the eggs. When I end up cleaning the pan I even scrub out the dish pan, and get a new dish rag after. Then I wash my hands and everything. (and the stove and the counter...)I've been quite cautious. My husband too has been very careful. He is careful not to touch her or her food ar anything else until he is done with the egg and has washed his hands. We have also eliminated all (that we know of right now) peanut and tree nut products from our home since. This is very frustrating. We actually had grilled cheese today, no reaction. So I don't think it's dairy, and 4 weeks ago she tested neg on skin prick and 7 weeks ago it was .41 UK/L on her immunocap which our allergist said in light of the neg sp, she does not have a milk allergy. She drinks milk at every meal and only reacts to certain meals. But still...... Thanks for the thoughts so far I'd welcome anymore.

Kara

On Oct 27, 2006

Kara, you are doing a fantastic job so far! Dealing with both PA and EA is very difficult. We've been at this for over 6 yrs now, so my sympathies are definitely with you.

A couple of thoughts.

As far as "reactions" go, with messy eaters that aren't very verbal yet, sometimes contact irritation can masquerade as an actual food reaction. We've seen this with citrus and tomato products in particular, but also with other foods at various times. Sometimes anywhere the food touches it leaves red welts. But it isn't really a "reaction." Though if I closely watch my daughter for a period of four or five hours, even now I can count on watching her "blotch" up a few times for reasons that elude us. (It isn't allergic, as far as we can tell.)

Not saying that is necessarily what is happening, but just that we were very very concerned about this kind of thing at one time as well.

The second thing I wanted to say is that you are still VERY new to eliminating the food allergens. I hope you don't take this the wrong way, but with my experience dealing with an EA, I really doubt you've got it [i]all[/i] out yet. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] This one is terribly sneaky and hides in other foods in ways that are absolutely mind-boggling. Cross-contact is a dreadful problem with egg, too-- and it takes quite a while to develop a sense for which products are likely to be cross-contaminated. Very seldom is this noted on the label. Salad dressings, dessert mixes, baking mixes and pastas are HUGE offenders. Anything that is baked should be suspect. If it wasn't brushed with an egg wash, something baked on the same rack may have been. We do not trust store-bought baked goods (including bread) for this reason.

Also, not a criticism so much as an observation-- very few people can actually keep eggs in the house without a lot of cross-contamination accidents.

Anyway-- just a couple of thoughts for you. I know you are very worried. I remember that feeling very well. It will get easier. And you will get better at this, too! In another six months, this will all seem very natural.

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by Corvallis Mom (edited October 27, 2006).]

On Oct 27, 2006

Thank you Corvallis mom!! I want to thank you very much for the advice and thoughts.(And kind words!!) we are very new to this!! You're right eggs are sneaky! I don't buy any store bought breads or baked goods. I like to bake so I've been experimenting with baked goods (no eggs or pn or tn). The only bread I do buy yet is the Aunt Millies. It looks safe! She has not had any hives when eating that bread. I do know what you mean by a contact thing, but as far as my allergist is concerned he says it must be some kind of an intolerance, different than an allergy. Were you told that? I'm just curious. Also, like I said it's becoming more frequent now and her allergist said that like allergies these intolerances can be unpredictable and possibly get worse. Once we find the culprit we need to eliminate it for two years. Have you found the contact dermatitis to be getting better now or the same or worse? I'm just wondering. Thanks so much for your response, it really is good to hear from people who know about these things and have "been there, done that, still doing it!!"

Kara

On Oct 27, 2006

Hives would usually be an IgE-mediated reaction and would be considered an allergy. Sometimes hives occur from additives such as dyes. The mechanism for this is not known. Many (but not all) gastro-intestinal reactions are intolerances rather than "true" allergies.

If you are still using mayonnaise, switch to "Vegenaise" [url="http://www.followyourheart.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=fyh&Category_Code=GV"]http://www.followyourheart.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code=fyh&Category_Code=GV[/url]

It's really quite good and far better than the other egg-free mayo substitutes.

Need any egg-free baking/cooking advice? I'd be happy to help!

Cathy

------------------ Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

On Oct 27, 2006

We were absolutely convinced at one point that we [i]must[/i] be dealing with another mystery allergy... we were just SURE that we saw hives on DD's face, chin, and sometimes her hands. This was when she was 2-3.5 yo or so. We tried keeping a food diary, though, and it didn't really correlate with anything in particular that we could see. But we were VERY convinced, because every time it happened, we gave Benadryl and washed her up, and about 15 minutes later the hives would go away.

Allergist's take on this was that certainly there are non-IgE mediated skin reactions to additives, mostly dyes... but that he wanted us to try something else for a week. Skip the benadryl and just wash her up instead. So we did. Sheepishly, we discovered that the skin irritation that we had observed was resolving itself in the same amount of time that the "benadryl" had taken to work its magic.

Foods that we noticed did this to her-- anything with a high sugar content, high salt content, or moderately high acidity. Spicy foods, including spices like cinnamon. So ketchup, fruit juice, sweetened applesauce, pizza, lunchmeats, homemade pumpkin pie (no egg) etc. Even wiping her up with a damp washcloth could do it, for that matter.

Her skin is somewhat less sensitive now, but mostly we are just more used to it, and so we don't automatically assume that tiny red marks on her are "hives" unless she complains about being really itchy. That and she's less messy.

Real hives tend (for my DD) to turn into wicked patches of eczema a day or so later. And they also tend re-pop when the benadryl wears off.

Just one other comment-- with prepared foods that contain pasta, you can't necessarily rely on even the BEST labelling practices to reveal the cross-contact risk.

I think until you figure out what is going on, though, you and your DH would benefit from having the eggs out of your house entirely. That way there is NO question in your mind about the possibility. Egg is one which is notorious for persisting even through very thorough washing. Can he stand to eat them only somewhere else for now? I know this is hard-- my DH still misses them terribly sometimes.

On Oct 27, 2006

Was she eating any other legumes with her meal like peas or green beans? My son used to break out in hives from peas. He had a lot of mystery hives after he was diagnosed at 18mos. Very frustating when you know your child has not eaten anything they are allergic to. He would also get hives from garlic bread, ketchup, french fries (salt) and some other stuff. I think a food diary is a great idea. Hopefully it isn't anything to worry about.

Congrats on your 4th!

On Oct 27, 2006

My PA ds started having a problem with certain preservatives/additives when he was, I think, around 15 months old. It was only in foods that were "wet".

At first it was just blotchy redness, his doctor (at the time) said it was no big deal, and not to worry about it.

Well, it didn't take long for him to start having all out reactions. Hives, sneezing, runny nose, lip swelling.

We switched to organic products of the things he was having problems with, and the reactions stopped. A year later, we tried again, same problems. Next year, same problems. The next year we tried, he seemed to have outgrown it, but a few months later he started reacting again, but not as badly. We currently avoid the triggers.

On Oct 27, 2006

Wow! Thank you everyone for all of the advice and ideas! We thought we were going crazy! Last night we felt lost, like where do we go from here, but you have given us some great ideas to look into! My very, very supportive husband read all of the info here and said he would ditch the eggs! He agreeed that if they were out of the house then we don't have to wonder in the back of our minds all the time if we are leaving residue around. (I know he will miss them!) Corvallis mom, yes we have done the benadryl a couple of times and other times not and it does seem to clear up in the same amount of time!! With the exception of the swollen, red tongue last week, all of these other occasions don't seem to spread far from her mouth. Her face does seem to be a bit patchy looking since Monday nights flare up. We are questioning eczema that seems to flare up now. The stuff about spicy, salty foods also seems to make some sense. Of course we are finding that other than what an allergy or intolerance actually is as far as body mechanisms and the way your body responds to things, ther really are no rules to allergies and intolerances. That's too bad, it'd be a lot easier if there were just a rule book to go by!!!! And I think it might have been Cathy?? who said she had egg free snack and cooking ideas?? I'd love some. I should say I'd love more!! Now I guess I should go to bed and dream about all the possibilities! (maybe it'll put me into labor.) I guess I won't be bored in the hospital after I have this baby!! Lots to think about. I'd be happy to take more! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Kara

On Oct 29, 2006

Ok, it's me again. Thought we had kind of calmed our minds about our dd and her recents minor reactions, but... We have been kind of looking at her face and noticing it has seemed kind of dry and patchy recently, thought we'd go with the thought that she is just getting irritated by high salt content, spicy, etc. But today at noon she broke out in hives on her face. She was very itchy and the welts were moderate in size. So definetly worse than the last few. We had to give her benadryl because she couldn't keep her hands off! She had: unseasoned steak on the grill,that had a little bit of margarine and olive oil on it. Orzo with margarine, corn (just on her plate) and milk to drink. Here's the kicker: We wiped a piece of the beef on her right wrist and orzo on her left wrist (the two things she ate) she broke out in hives on the wrist we wiped the steak! Here's my question: 1: Has anyone heard of or had problems with beef? Like a protein in it? 2: Is there any one out there with problems with olive oil??

Kara

On Oct 29, 2006

My first questions would be:

1. What else has EVER been on that grill? (Seafood or fish would top the list of concerns, obviously) Basting sauces are also a concern there.

2. "Unseasoned"-- does this mean nothing at all? No salt, no pepper, really nothing? (Because it is possible for some salt blends to contain other ingredients.)

3. Where did the meat come from? Was it from a place that may have applied a marinating/tenderizing agent? A preservative? Or could it have been cross-contaminated somehow in the place it was packaged?

4. Are you really, really sure that what you were seeing was actually hives, even in spots where nothing had actually touched her skin? (Just from living with a kid with super-sensitive skin, we never assume anything involving direct contact with anything wet, greasy, cold, hot, or sticky is hives, especially if she already has dry skin... but our DD has VERY fair, sensitive skin.)

5. Is she milk allergic? (Don't recall this.) If so, take another look at your margarine container.

I would also be concerned about the margarine and pasta, even though you say her one wrist was apparently okay. Almost ALL commercial pastas share a line with egg, and few of them note this on labels. Protein allergies aren't that unusual, but just anecdotally it seems as though pork is a somewhat more common offender than beef. And neither one is "common." Fish or seafood contamination would be more likely, IMO.

Just things to think about. Sounds like it might be time to pull back from regular table food for a while and feed her a very simple diet that she tolerates. (Thinking plain chicken, plain rice, very plain vegetables like carrots/sweet potatoes.) Then you can try a few other very plain foods one at a time to figure out where the trouble is coming from.

On Oct 29, 2006

I was hoping to hear your ideas Corvallis mom!! 1. She is not milk allergic. She drinks milk every meal, no problems. 2. Yes, the steak had some olive oil and margarine on it- no salt, seasonings, pepper, etc. (after reading your last post to me we decided to go with the salt, spice, and acidic free approach) 3. Positive they were hives. We have a long history of hives in our family, there is no mistaking very red skin with large white welts (wheals). A 4. I just can't get over the way her wrist reacted to the steak also. Not the orzo.

The other thing is that she has indeed reacted to pork also. At the time we questioned the seasoning also, but now we are wondering if there are certain pork and beef protein allergens that affect her?? Thus the deli hams, dried beef, pork chops, steak, burger?? I thought for sure having unseasoned beef would do the trick....

(the meat comes from my local meat market, I have gone there and talked to the owners, who I have gotten to know over the past years, being a regular, explained how important this is, and they have told me they put absolutely nothing in their meats, not dyes, preservatives,etc. They chop it and it goes into the case.)

I can't remember all of your questions, I've tried to answer them all!!

Thanks, Kara

On Oct 29, 2006

Just a thought on the grilling---some charcoals contain peanuts. Also, I know you said you talked to the butchers, but do they sell peanuts? I've seen butchers weighing peanuts on the same scale that they then weigh their meat! Eek. On the olive oil, we had Whole Foods organic 365 line and it did indeed say it was manufactured in the same facility as peanut oil. Some other big brands do the same b/c they have a whole line of "unique" oils: peanut, hazelnut, soybean, safflower, etc...

Sounds like you're doing a great job! We're just dealing with PA and sensitivies like cinnamon and citrus--I can't imagine how hard it is to get rid of egg (and milk too for the MA out there). Best of luck!!

Jen

On Oct 29, 2006

Hmmmm.... sounds like it could really be a meat protein allergy... does your butcher shop keep kosher? If they don't, I'd definitely look into the possibility of seafood cross-contamination. Or on your grill...

Have you used anything containing eggs in any of the cookware used to prep her meal? If you have, it is still a possibility (although remote).

About that grill, though... food proteins [i]can[/i] survive on them for quite some time, as incredible as it seems. If you grill a lot, you might consider putting her food on foil instead of the grill surface.

If she does have a pork allergy or a beef allergy, you'll obviously want to let your allergist know what you suspect when you go in.

Three things that I would probably do in the meantime?

Use a fresh container of margarine just for her-- one that knives have [i]NEVER[/i] been double-dipped into.

Get packaged chicken from someone like Tyson that doesn't handle other meats...and don't cook them with other meats.

Only feed her plain potatoes, sweet potatoes, plain corn or flour tortillas (check these carefully), or regular rice you've made yourself for starches. (No commercial bread, pasta, or mixes.)

Actually, this isn't as hard as it sounds-- just take a square of aluminum foil, smear it with a touch of your margarine and place a bit of chicken in the middle with diced potatoes and veggies, then close it up into a little packet and bake until it is done. If your daughter is anything like mine was at that age, as long as it is finger food that isn't green, all will be well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]

Also (goes without saying) keep a food diary to show your allergist.

On Oct 29, 2006

?

[This message has been edited by NicoleinNH (edited June 09, 2007).]

On Oct 29, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by KaraLH: [b]4 weeks ago she tested neg on skin prick and 7 weeks ago it was .41 UK/L on her immunocap which our allergist said in light of the neg sp, she does not have a milk allergy. She drinks milk at every meal and only reacts to certain meals.[/b]

Kara, I'm still suspicious of milk allergy. 0.41 is slightly elevated. Anything under 0.35 is considered negative and younger children usually have a lower threshhold. Could it be that she tolerates a certain amount of milk and over that she develops hives? That would be consistent with a low RAST and neg SPT.

Milk is the common element in all the reactions you have mentioned. It is more common to have a milk allergy than beef/pork allergies. Also, the egg, milk peanut triad is a very common set of allergies among kids her age. My kids both followed that pattern, except that DS was never exposed to peanuts so he tests negative.

Look back at your food diary and see if you think she had more milk and milk products on days that she reacted. It also seems that she reacts more often at dinner. Is her milk bucket just getting filled up for the day at dinner? It might be worth the effort to try eliminating milk for a couple of weeks to see if skin blotchiness and hive outbreaks stop.

About the beef on the arm thing, a certain percentage of kids with milk allergy are allergic to beef. Maybe giving her milk and beef at the same meal put her over her tolerance limit.

I can offer you egg-free recipes for birthday cake, pumpkin pie, banana muffins, corn muffins, pancakes, cookies, zucchini bread, homemade bread. Just let me know what you're interested in. There are also some egg-free recipes in the recipe section of the boards. Use the search function to search for "eggless" or "egg-free".

Some egg-free specialty products that will help you in your cooking experiments [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] are xanthan gum, Ener-G egg replacer, Vegenaise, Ricemellow Creme, Knox Gelatine, flax seed meal.

The trick to cooking without eggs is to figure out the function of the eggs in the recipe you are using. Are they a binder? Providing moisture or richness? Leavening? Thickening? Often, the eggs are performing more than one function and you have to figure out the right combination of substitutes. Often, you can use extra baking powder or corn starch or add oil, applesauce, yogurt or sour cream.

My kids have had mystery reactions before and it just drives me batty. I really hope we can help you figure this out.

Cathy

------------------ Mom to 7 yr old PA/TNA daughter and 3 1/2 yr old son who is allergic to eggs.

On Oct 30, 2006

I would guess milk or red meat-- or both.

On Oct 30, 2006

They do not test for everything on the RAST. Only the most common allergens. There can also be false negatives and positives (as I can atest). If the scale is 3+ then the possibility of a false positive is basically nill.

So basically you have to do the detective work. I'd suggest #1 remove all prepackaged and processed foods from you dd's diet. If a label has 30 ingredients on it you will have a very hard time trying to determine what is causing the problem. Make everything from scratch with no additives. For instance I give my boys filets of chicken breast baked with their safe margarine (dairy, egg, wheat, soy, nut, etc. etc. free) and salt and pepper. Fresh, boiled potatoes with same margarine and a steamed veg. That is a typical meal. They drink 100% pure juice of a variety they aren't allergic to. No sweetners, no additives, etc. They eat very very few tinned things (tuna being one of them). The pasta they eat contains rice and millet or corn that's it!

Now all of this can be expensive and time-consuming BUT it is worth it. Then you can pinpoint the problems. In conjunction with this I highly recommend keeping a food diary to identify the problems.

Barb

On Oct 30, 2006

Wow again! thank for everyones help! Here a few more answers to some of the questions you asked: 1: we cook on a gas grill and haven't for quite some time (ie 6 weeks?) -but I do like the idea of cooking her food on foil because we do use it at least every other day or more in the spring and summer> 2: Butcher has no seafood an does not sell peanuts 3: The utensils that my husband used to grill my daughters food yesterday were different than anything we would have cooked egg with.

It also looks like we will be doing a plain diet for her for a while. Any more help with that would be great. She is incredibly picky!!

I do cook using egg replacers and egg replacer recipes, my biggest problem is knowing how it works in the recipe,ie)binder,leavener, just liquid etc. Any help with that??

I think that is about all, except that someone mention the reaction that their child had to peanuts and hives that wouldn't go away. That is about what my daughter is like right now. It seems as though maybe it is just in her system now and she keeps flaring up. Maybe I will keep an eye on it and call the doc in a few days. May be she does need a dose of prednisone or something? We'll keep an eye on it.

Thanks again.

of course last night I was having false labor- again... We'll see what happens first, the baby or visiting the doctor for my daughter!!

Kara

On Oct 30, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by KaraLH: [b]It also looks like we will be doing a plain diet for her for a while. Any more help with that would be great. She is incredibly picky!!

I do cook using egg replacers and egg replacer recipes, my biggest problem is knowing how it works in the recipe,ie)binder,leavener, just liquid etc. Any help with that?? [/b]

What kinds of things does she like? Do you have a particular recipe you are trying to adapt?

And congratulations on your upcoming baby #4 [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Cathy

On Oct 30, 2006

Here's my latest egg-free (actually top 8 allergens-free) recipe. I made these today with the kids:

Gingerbread Cookies

1/4 cup Mother's margarine 1/2 cup brown sugar 1/2 cup dark molasses (unsulfured) 1/4 cup water

1 3/4 cup amaranth flour 1 3/4 cup tapioca flour 1 tsp baking soda 1 tsp ginger 1/2 tsp cinnamon 1/4 tsp cloves 1/4 tsp salt

Combine first four ingredients in a large bowl. Mix with mixer until smooth. In another bowl, combine flours, baking soda, salt and spices. Add flour mixture to wet ingredients. Mix well. Chill for 1 hour. Preheat oven to 350. Roll out dough on a floured surface about 1/4 inch thick. Cut out shapes with cookie cutters and place on a nonstick cookie sheet. Bake for 8-10 minutes at 350. Cool for 5 minutes and use a spatula to remove them and cool completely on a rack.

Frost them if you want--

Frosting:

3 cups powdered sugar 1/2 cup Spectrum shortening 3 Tbsp water 1 tsp vanilla extract food coloring if desired

Combine all ingredients in a large bowl. Mix with a mixer until smooth. Spread on cooled cookies.

Cathy

On Oct 31, 2006

Thanks for the recipe! I'll have to try that, although I don't think it will happen before baby! What is spectrum shortening, name brand I'm assuming. I that a pn free, is crisco not good to use?? As for my daughter, what she really likes is steak, deli meats, dried beef, pork, all things she reacts to. She will eat an occassional chicken casserole. My husband and I at this point just figure, she'll have to learn to like new and different things. She likes pasta a lot to. Any ideas for that if we shouldn't be buying prepackaged??

thanks, kara

On Oct 31, 2006

Hi and welcome to the board.

You mentioned that you are to take her to the doctor in 2-4 weeks.

Do you have an epi-pen for her? Talk to the doctor about the preservative in the epi-pen because you mentioned that she has intolerances to some preservatives.

Does anyone know if twinject has the same preservative?

*******

Sorry to possibly add another worry to your load, but I thought it best to mention it [i]before[/i] you see the doctor.

On Oct 31, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by Corvallis Mom: [b]

As far as "reactions" go, with messy eaters that aren't very verbal yet, sometimes contact irritation can masquerade as an actual food reaction. We've seen this with citrus and tomato products in particular, but also with other foods at various times. Sometimes anywhere the food touches it leaves red welts.

Anyway-- just a couple of thoughts for you. I know you are very worried. I remember that feeling very well. It will get easier. And you will get better at this, too! In another six months, this will all seem very natural.

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] ][/b]

this is what i was thinking too... on my daughter who has no allergies yogert gives her red welts on her face where it lands. ( she is 5 but is the messiest eater in the world!) so does canned shells and sauce. and some types of canned fruit. but she has no allergies, just sensitive skin.

and i also want to add that right now everything is NEW and VERY OVERWHELMING!! your not alone ,every one here is going through or has been through something like this and has lots and lots of good advice!! keep your chin up, this will get easier! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

erin ps... get rid of the eggs in the house... it will make life easier on all involved. if your husband realy wants an egg in the morning have him eat out for breakfast. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by smudgesgarden (edited October 31, 2006).]

On Oct 31, 2006

Thanks for the tip on the epi-pen! I'll mention that to the doctor. And we did indeed get rid of all the eggs!!!! As of this morning. My husband hasn't had an egg since Thursday evening and I just gave the dozen I had yet in the fridge to a neighbor this morning. (couldn't just throw them away!) We actually think we may have it somewhat narrowed down to beef and pork, as strange as that may sound. We aren't sure yet, but after all the great advice we've been able to do a bit of narrowing and that's what it seems like right now. (of course as you all know, that will probably change!!) I do hope to get to the allergist in the next month, but not knowing when baby is coming makes it difficult to schedule!

Thanks for all the great help!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Kara

On Oct 31, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by KaraLH: [b]Thanks for the recipe! I'll have to try that, although I don't think it will happen before baby! What is spectrum shortening, name brand I'm assuming. I that a pn free, is crisco not good to use?? As for my daughter, what she really likes is steak, deli meats, dried beef, pork, all things she reacts to. She will eat an occassional chicken casserole. My husband and I at this point just figure, she'll have to learn to like new and different things. She likes pasta a lot to. Any ideas for that if we shouldn't be buying prepackaged??

thanks, kara[/b]

Spectrum shortening is coconut oil shortening. I used it because it is soy-free, but you could use just about any margarine, butter or shortening that works for you. As far as I know, Crisco is ok. Also, you can use 3 1/2 cups of all-purpose flour (the regular wheat and barley kind) in place of the amaranth and tapioca flours.

It sounds like your daughter prefers savory flavors. What about turkey or chicken sausage? Make sure to check and see what kind of casing is on it though--could be pork or beef if you are trying to avoid that. She may like dark meat from chicken and turkey better than the white. My kids also prefer savory meats. A big hit with them is roast chicken. I just sprinkle it all over with Season-All and spray it with a little olive oil spray before roasting it. Isn't there something called "turkey bacon?" I have no idea what's in it, but you could check that out. We also used to get these dried turkey sticks at Trader Joe's. You could look for other turkey jerky type things. There are chicken Vienna sausages and chicken/turkey hot dogs.

You can make yams or butternut squash in the microwave and them mash them with butter or margarine. Steam cauliflower until it's tender and put butter or margarine on it. Can you tell my kids prefer any veggies that aren't green [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

We do use prepackaged pasta, but I avoid Barilla and any others that have a "processed on equipment with eggs" warning.

Cathy

On Oct 31, 2006

Wow, you are a plethera of info Cathy!! Pitiful I never thought about dark meat chicken or turkey! I always get chicken breasts! I think I might even be able to save a few pennies getting more dark meat! All that other stuff sound worth a try (or two or three) also! I have tried the squash. Been eating a lot of it lately. But just my hubby, son and me. DD's won't touch it. Maybe when she gets hungry enough....

Kara

On Oct 31, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by KaraLH: [b] I have tried the squash. Been eating a lot of it lately. But just my hubby, son and me. DD's won't touch it. [/b]

A little brown sugar never hurt anybody [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Yes, I will use any and all condiments to get my kids to eat vegetables, LOL!

Cathy

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