Were your PA kids late to start solids?

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2001 - 1:43pm
Milkmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2001 - 09:00

[Sorry, if this has been discussed before, I searched but nothing came up].

My ds, now 18 mos. did not show any real interest in solids until he was around 14 months. In my quest to find some food he would eat, we discovered he was PA.

Someone at La Leche League had mentioned that kids who start solids late often are more prone to food allergies and it is sort of a subconscious defense mechanism. At the time I thought, that is interesting (but didn't think it could apply to my ds). Now I know how right she was!

Is this true for anyone else?

At first I was lamenting the fact that I was sustaining a 26 pound baby solely by my breastmilk, but now this PA thing has cropped up, I find myself afraid to relinquish the control I have over his diet. Breastfeeding just seems so much safer! I worry every time he puts something into his mouth.

I know I need to get over it, especially since they probably won't allow me into the dorms to nurse him when he's in college [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] LOL!

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Amy

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2001 - 2:27pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

No. My little guy started them as soon as Gerber *told* us to and in the exact order he was *supposed* to try them in.
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2001 - 9:57pm
Claire's picture
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Joined: 04/19/2000 - 09:00

Christopher was very young at starting solids. I don't blame myself anymore,but always used to. He had a lot of teeth early so I would feed him table food with us at dinner. When i say young I am talking 9/10 months old.
I kept my next two kids off table food much longer until at least one year and they have there own allergies. My daughter is really bad to cats and outdoor things. So I guess what is meant to be is just so. Yes I lived on peanut butter while pregnant. It was actually the only food i could eat.
I don't know if age has a lot to do with feeding them or not but we have to do what we are comfortable doing.
If i had ever known about peanut allergies believe me he would not have had them. Take care claire

Posted on: Thu, 08/16/2001 - 11:39pm
Georgia Mom's picture
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Joined: 08/08/2001 - 09:00

My PA son also had a mouth full of teeth early (he had eight teeth at 7 months) so he was eating some soft table food by eight months.

Posted on: Fri, 08/17/2001 - 12:21am
babyjakesmom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2001 - 09:00

Hi-yes, my son Jake is 10 months old and breastfed and I'm lucky if I can get him to eat 3 TBS of rice cereal with bananas twice a day, a little bit of rice-bread toast with ground chicken smeared on it, and a little fruit like pear or peeled cut-up grapes. He's allergic to peanuts, egg whites, soy, green peas, is lactose intollerant and I also suspect wheat. In a way I'm glad I'm still breastfeeding him because I'm nervous to start introducing foods but he's also a lightweight (18 lbs 6 oz) so in a way I wish he'd eat more!

Posted on: Fri, 08/17/2001 - 12:26am
babyjakesmom's picture
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Joined: 04/23/2001 - 09:00

oh, forgot to say, my whole family teases me about nursing him on the way out the door to college!

Posted on: Fri, 08/17/2001 - 12:26am
KevinsMom's picture
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Joined: 03/01/2001 - 09:00

My son started solids on time as recommended by our pediatrician. He was diagnosed with PA at 11 months when a friend gave him a peanut butter cookie. Although I knew nothing about food allergies, I was holding off on introducing peanut butter because it could be a choking hazard for young children. I wasn't aware, at the time, of exposing ds to potential food allergens through my breastmilk. I also wasn't aware that the probablitity of ds developing a food allergy was greater due to the eczema he had as an infant.
I am curious about the comments by the La Lechue rep, however. Did she mean that infants that develop food allergies naturally protect themselves by refusing solid foods? That's an interesting idea I hadn't really thought about before. It does make sense though.
Did she mean that introducing solid foods later than currently recommended by pediatricians would contribute to developing food allergies? Our son's allergist said that studies indicate the introduction of solid foods (especially those that cause the majority of food allergies) for infants with known risks for developing food allergies (infants with eczema or a family history of food allergies) should be done later than "normally" recommended. He also recommends that mothers eliminate some foods from their diet (peanuts, nuts, shellfish at least) while breastfeeding babies thought to have a risk of developing food allergies. I'm concerned that if the La Leche rep was telling you that introducing solid foods later would cause food allergies than any other information that she is sharing regarding food allergies may be incorrect.

Posted on: Fri, 08/17/2001 - 1:47am
williamsmummy's picture
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Joined: 03/26/2002 - 09:00

I found this interseting , my son was introduced to solids at five 1/2 months, refused them so waited for a while to see if he would take it. I was told so many times by well meaning people that some solids would help william to sleep. (what a load of rubbish!!) Any way when william was a small baby he would often be hard to breast fed , arching his head away , when previously he was fine...looking back i bet the it was because of what i ate that was causing the problem. His skin would eruppt if i used hair spray or differant washing powder for goodness sake.
As time went by he never ate a great deal often turning his head away from simple foods that my other children adored. Then at around 9 months he started to sniff food ,(still does !!) sometimes as we sat eating our meals he would carefully push the food over the edge of the high chair uneaten, his hands would sometimes react to the food , once he had wheals to what i thought was tomatos at the time (live and learn mummy, allergy virgin as i was then!!!). I think that he knew what he could eat and what he couldnt, and it wasnt until he was a year old , on piriton twice daily that we gave him some peanut butter on toast, bingo,! he just touched it and had face and hand flushing , loverly bubbles all over face and neck and very very itchy, eyes watering. So as we all learn through the painfull hard way , we found that not only was he allergic to nuts, but eggs, then the fur from our MIL dog and cat would land on him and blisters would appear. hmmm, not nice. William showed clear classic signs of food allergy, poor sleep pattern (pattern???) excema under 3 months (8-10 days old) weight gain small , slow , but on an upward curve until 6 months onward, when he sliped from the 50 th centile to the 25 where at five years he still sits, his height is good at the 50th and he is still growing, slimmer but upward!(at the moment, sigh!)!
Breast feeding may have masked the food allergys because bottle fed babys due seem to need solids earlier and perhaps we would have had confirmation of his problems sooner if he was.
But hindsight is a great thing isnt it?
I think the lessons to be learned are to let the baby follow his instincts, william knew what was wrong , I, we his parents didnt, he was telling us , but we had no idea. We do now.
babys know a lot more than we think!!!!

Posted on: Fri, 08/17/2001 - 6:53am
veteran.pa's picture
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Joined: 06/23/2000 - 09:00

My second breastfed child would not eat anything offered her until she was eleven months old. For the next three months she would only eat strained squash once or twice a week from the large baby food jars. At fifteen months of age she grabbed some crackers off the table and from then on she would eat anything I gave her. I kept her from eggs (except those found in processed foods), oranges, shellfish, and tomato until she was eighteen months old. I kept her from all peanut products until she was four years old. She breastfed past her third birthday and has always been the epitome of good health. I also teased that no way was I going to the college dorm to breast feed her. Time passes quickly; she has never had food allergies; next week she moves into her college dorm.

Posted on: Sun, 08/19/2001 - 2:03pm
Milkmom's picture
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Joined: 04/02/2001 - 09:00

To clarify, I think the La Leche League rep was just trying to offer me an explanation as to why my one year old would not eat solids when it seems like most kids do by 6 months. I told her that I was worried about him and that was when she mentioned that it might be a blessing in disquise (i.e. if he was protecting himself from 'dangerous food') and that I should not worry about him. I thought it was very interesting and wanted to see if it was true for any other food allergic children. From the posts, though, it doesn't seem very common.
Thanks for the posts!
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Amy

Posted on: Sun, 08/19/2001 - 2:52pm
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

I'm sorry, in actually seeing how others have replied, it looks as though you meant when did your child start eating real people food, not baby food. To me, solids was the cereal and then other baby food that they consume.
And, as I posted, Jesse did that on the time schedule provided by Gerber.
As far as solid food, as in real people, off-the-table food, I also know that he actually didn't start to consume full-time until he was 18 months old (also when he was diagnosed with PA). He was still eating the Toddler version of baby food when he was 18 months of age along with some bits and bites from whatever was on our table. But he still had his baby food really, until 18 months of age. My daughter was completely different.
Completely.
Sorry for the confusion. Maybe I'm not that forgetful if I remember solids as being cereal and baby food rather than breast or formula! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]
Best wishes! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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