Introduction and a peanut butter / peanut dust question

Posted on: Mon, 12/22/2014 - 1:50pm
Biev's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/22/2014 - 20:25

Hi, I'm Biev. I've been lurking around here for information since my little step-brother is allergic to peanuts. His mom has cancer, so I've been trying to help out by preparing meals for the family. We don't live together, and my house isn't peanut-free (though we try to stay away from anything that might produce peanut dust).

Usually when I cook for them I stick with things like veggies and meat, and avoid baking sweets since I'm not sure about some of the ingredients. But Christmas is coming up, and I made cookies for everyone, so I thought I'd at least give my brother chocolates. I'm using Baker, which is what they use at home.

Here's my question : I have little mesh bags to put the chocolates in (along with dehydrated fruit). Those have been sitting on the table in an open container for a while. At one point we ate peanut butter, and I made sure everyone stayed away from the bags, but then I started wondering if eating peanut butter might create peanut dust that could cling to the bags and dried fruit?

I figured I'd ask your opinions on the matter. Am I being paranoid?

Posted on: Tue, 12/23/2014 - 6:03am
smithdcrk's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/13/2014 - 16:46

The food lovingly prepared with the child's allergies in mind is a wonderful gift.
Peanut Butter is not inherently dusty, but when I bake for a child who does not share our allergies, like you, I am ultra conservative. Like you did, I check to see which brands they use at home and after a thorough surface & tool cleansing, I prep and bake from un-opened (fresh containers). While the kitchen is in it's "allergen free" state, I open nothing that may contain the allergen. The PB may not be dusty, but the PB sandwich crumbs may spread out. I treat the allergen with all the respect and watchfulness I would give the flu virus sneeze.
Maybe a nice new baggie decorated with curling ribbon?
Also, did you double check the dried fruit? That is one of our hardest items to find without a "may contain ..." or "manufactured in a facility that ..." processes peanuts.

Posted on: Tue, 12/23/2014 - 9:38am
Biev's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/22/2014 - 20:25

Oh! yes, I dried the fruit myself so it's safe. Thanks for your advice! I'll see if I can find a new container for the chocolates just to be on the safe side.
Merry Christmas : )

Posted on: Fri, 12/26/2014 - 5:28am
PeanutAllergy.com's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/21/2013 - 11:03

Question of the Week: Answered!
Every week, PeanutAllergy.com answers one of the questions posted in our community.
Our Answer:
When it comes to a food allergy, you can never be too paranoid! Surely your stepbrother and his mother appreciate your caution when it comes to cooking.
We suggest that you err on the side of caution even though reactions from airborne inhalation of peanut dust are rare. Normally, it takes a large amount of peanuts to create a reaction. You can read more about airborne proteins and other forms of accidental ingestion here.
However, everyone’s sensitivity to peanuts is different when it comes to allergies. If you want to take precautionary steps, it’s best to keep the space where you make your stepbrother’s snacks completely peanut-free. This will eliminate any chance of cross-contamination. For example, make sure that if you handwash plates you use hot water and careful scrubbing.
If you are afraid your mesh bags might have been too close to peanut butter, play it safe and use other containers. We have more tips on how to prepare your kitchen space to be safe here.
Because the get-together will also include snacks that are not peanut-free, it’s important to be supportive of your stepbrother. Make sure other guests know about his allergy and that he feels comfortable and safe in the environment. You can read more tips for how to support someone with a food allergy here.
Lastly, you should browse through our peanut-free recipes! These can give you some good worry-free ideas for baking. You can see our peanut-free dessert recipes here.
We asked our Facebook community for some tips and here’s what they had to say.
We hope this response helps. Happy holidays!

Posted on: Tue, 12/30/2014 - 5:37am
Biev's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/22/2014 - 20:25

Thank you so much! I really appreciate it.

More Community Posts

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

create a new community post
Latest Post by birgitbaker1131381 Tue, 11/19/2019 - 5:19am
Comments: 0
Latest Post by vallierichmond444 Tue, 11/19/2019 - 3:17am
Comments: 0
Latest Post by william robenstein Mon, 11/18/2019 - 10:35am
Comments: 1
Latest Post by sunshinestate Sun, 11/17/2019 - 1:16pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by absfabs Fri, 11/15/2019 - 5:32pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by Italia38 Tue, 11/12/2019 - 2:43pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by absfabs Mon, 11/11/2019 - 1:23pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by Italia38 Fri, 11/08/2019 - 12:10pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by Italia38 Fri, 11/08/2019 - 11:47am
Comments: 6
Latest Post by sunshinestate Thu, 11/07/2019 - 3:43pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by sunshinestate Thu, 11/07/2019 - 2:48pm
Comments: 7
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 11/05/2019 - 3:44pm
Comments: 12
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 11/05/2019 - 3:35pm
Comments: 13
Latest Post by absfabs Tue, 11/05/2019 - 2:11pm
Comments: 6

More Articles

According to the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, over 50 million people in the U.S. have allergies. Today's allergy tests...

The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004 (FALCPA) addresses the labeling of packaged food products regulated by the FDA....

For people who suffer from anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction that can result from an allergy to...

Anaphylactic shock (A-nuh-fih-LAK-tik shok): A severe and sometimes life-threatening immune system reaction to an antigen that a person has been...

In 1963 the American Medical Association designed a special symbol that would alert emergency medical personnel of special medical conditions when...

More Articles

More Articles

Finding allergy-free foods for an office potluck may seem impossible, but more options are available than you might think. Eating foods prepared...

One of the most difficult things for a parent to do is determine whether his or her toddler has a cold or a...

You no doubt have your own way of teaching people about your child’s food allergy, a way that suits your temperament, and style of communication....

Reliable peanut allergy statistics are not that easy to come by. There is a lot of available research on food allergies in general but not too...

Most people know that to enjoy whatever food safety accommodations an airline offers they need to inform the airline of their allergy prior to...

A 504 plan* documents food allergy accommodations agreed to by parents and their child’s school. Plans are typically created during a 504 meeting...

If there is a child at your children's school allergic to peanuts, the school probably discourages or may not allow peanut products to be brought...

If you are on a budget, but you need to wear some sort of notification that you have a peanut...

Unless we consciously carve out time for self-care, constant food allergy management can slowly erode our sense of well-being. Signs of allergy-...

Peanuts cause more severe food allergic reactions than other foods, followed by shellfish, fish, tree nuts and eggs. Although there is only a...

If you avoid peanuts, it’s likely you know the joy of cashews. Slightly sweet and smooth in texture, cashews provide not only relief to those with...

The prevalence of food allergy has dramatically increased over the past two to three decades, and not just among children. Preliminary results...

When someone in the family is diagnosed with a food allergy, a choice must be made whether to ban the problem food or foods from the home. The...

Looking for a fun way to share what you know about your own food allergies? Or are you hoping to educate the people around you in a fun way about...

According to the results of a new study, children lacking Vitamin D may be more susceptible to food allergies. Researchers working at the Albert...