Vomiting

Posted on: Wed, 02/03/1999 - 12:18pm
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

So far every reaction I've read about on this board has mentioned only hives and swelling. My son vomited quite a bit about 30-45 minutes after he ate a peanut butter cookie (in addition to a few hives and some swelling around his eyes). Has anyone else experienced this after an exposure? How quickly did you or your child react the first time and subsequent times?

Thanks,

Tracy

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 3:52am
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Liz
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Joined: 01/17/1999 - 09:00

<p>Vomiting has always been a part of my set of symptoms. Note that I started as 'sensitive' and have progressed to anaphylactic after 38 years of accidental exposures. I would start treating this as very serious and perhaps your son will not then progress to the 'minute or less' state of reaction.</p>

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 6:55am
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Deb
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Joined: 01/22/1999 - 09:00

<p>My soon to be 6 year old daughter reacts with vomitting about 30 minutes after ingestion (although the nausea starts a little sooner). She has only ingested peanut butter once (during an oral challenge done under medical supervision last summer). Her eye swelled when she touched a table that had been used for a craft involving peanut-butter about 2 years ago (she probably rubbed her eye after touching the table).</p>

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 12:04pm
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Joined: 01/24/1999 - 09:00

<p>Having gone through two reactions with my son, the one where he vomitted was the least severe. He started vomitting 10 minutes after ingestion and continued doing so for 20-30 minutes. I viewed the vomitting as a positive because his little system was trying its best to expel the allegen. </p>
<p>Has anyone had any experience where both vomitting and anaphylaxsis occured? From my son's experience, the first time he was exposed he didn't vomit but went into anaphylactic shock. The second exposure he vomitted but avoided anaphylaxsis. I wonder if vomitting prevents anaphylaxis.</p>
<p>Noreen</p>

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 1:29pm
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Joined: 01/17/1999 - 09:00

<p>I regret to say that I have both vomiting and anaphylaxis. I finally had to start carrying an epi about 10 years ago, when the severity of the reaction made getting to emergency a doubtful proposition.</p>

Posted on: Thu, 02/04/1999 - 3:02pm
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Joined: 02/04/1999 - 09:00

<p>My son has 3 reactions to date, and all quite<br />
different. The first time he went into anapahalactic shock but no vomiting, hives or<br />
swelling. We know that he was in the same room a an open jar of peanut butter but to our knowledge he didn't eat any. The second time he age one bite of a chocolate bar and after about 20 minutes he threw up twice. At that point we gave him some Benadryl (on the advice of the ER doctor) and then we thought<br />
he was fine. It wasn't until about 3 hours later that his breathing was affected and at that time we used the Epipen and rushed him to the hospital. He was fine immediately after the injection.<br />
The third time he threw up four different times over a period of about 4 hours but no other symptoms.<br />
I think that vomiting may be very helpful in reducing the chance of anaphalaxis (I don't know if this if a fact or not, just my guess).<br />
I do know for a fact though that kids need to be watched for several hours after exposure as there can be a delayed reaction, as with his second experience. I thank God that I had let my son fall asleep with me while I was watching TV, or I don't know what might have happened!</p>

Posted on: Sun, 02/07/1999 - 3:44am
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Joined: 02/06/1999 - 09:00

<p>My son's first (2 1/2 yrs.) and so far only reaction caused him to vomit immediately. In fact, I thought he was choking. Within seconds of one tiny bite of peanut butter on toast he vomited, turned red in face, hives all within a minute or two. Then came the grey/blue lips and circles under his eyes - combined all of this was within 3 to 5 minutes. Thank goodness I'd had first aid and immediately connected all these reactions to the peanut butter and was on 911 before the breathing problem started. I have only been reading the peanutallergy.com chats for one week and I have learned so much with real-life experiences from everyone. Like I wrote, my son has only had one reaction. I am sure even as diligent as I am there will be more.</p>

Posted on: Mon, 02/15/1999 - 6:18am
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Joined: 01/27/1999 - 09:00

<p>My daughter's only experience was a piece of candy that went in her mouth about a second before I grabbed it out. She vomited immediately for about 10 minutes and had hives all over her body. I gave her Benadryl on the advice of my pediatrician. I wasn't aware how long these attacks can last so I thought she was fine and luckily she was. But I will never let her sleep alone if there is ever another episode. I am glad everyone shares their stories so we can all learn. I sometimes wonder at how lucky I have been. It seems that you never know when or how bad these attacks are going to be. I just pray I am careful enough to never have another one. Thanks for all the info. P.S I now carry 2 epis with me at all times just in case.</p>

Posted on: Mon, 02/15/1999 - 8:33am
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

<p>Oh wow... this is very scary indeed. When my son had his initial reaction, we gave him benadryl and he got sleepy, so we put him to bed. Had I known about delayed reactions, I would have put him in bed with us. Thank goodness he was okay. And I know to watch him closely afterwards now.</p>
<p>--Tracy</p>

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 4:10am
tracy's picture
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Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

An update on the vomiting issue...
We had an appt with our son's allergist late last week. I asked about vomiting, thinking it was probably a good sign because the body was ridding itself of the allergen. The allergist said that it's the stomach trying to deal with all the histamine that has been produced after being exposed to peanuts. So it's not a good thing to happen -- that's why vomiting is considered anaphylatic (sp?) because the allergy is affecting a major organ.
If anyone has additional information, let us know.
--Tracy

Posted on: Mon, 03/01/1999 - 4:54am
Patti's picture
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Joined: 01/27/1999 - 09:00

Hi Tracy. My daughter also vomited after her first reaction. When we saw our allergist a couple of weeks ago she diagnosed her as peanut anaphylactic. Again I wondered why but you don't always ask the right questions at the right time. In hindsight I could ask her a million more things, but I think you answered my question on why she considered her anaphylactic. I always thought it just meant you were having trouble breathing. Oh my god I just keep wondering how lucky I was that night that nothing worse happened. I didn;t even have an epi-pen then. Thanks for the info Tracy
Patti

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