27 posts / 0 new
Last post
Posted on: Tue, 03/21/2000 - 11:45am
ColleenMarie's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/04/2000 - 09:00

pIn the future, if anyone happens to notice this show in the listings during rerun seasons, please let us all know!! I really wish I could've seen it. /p
pI agree with the posted messages considering this show to be progress, even if it's not perfect. Education is the key, without a doubt. Ditto the "Thank you, NBC!"/p
pThe one part I'm curious about is the mother's reference to drug/alcohol abuse, etc. Could that actually be a cause? I find it doubtful, and it certainly isn't true with our family (I drink maybe a half a glass of wine in one year and didn't drink any during pregnancy - I even avoided all caffeine products! My husband drinks about 5-10 cans of beer a month. My parents don't drink at all. My husband's parents are within "limits". The only traceable history of alcoholism in either family is my grandfather who was a "functional alcoholic"). /p
pWith the exception of pregnancy, I've never been a very healthy eater and fear that maybe that's somehow related. I also think it's possibly related to our environment (There's a book called *Allergic to the Twentieth Century* which addresses this). Or perhaps years ago pa were mistaken for other illnesses and not documented appropriately. /p
pOne more thought: what about a possible link to birth control pills? I had just stopped taking them and was pregnant within the month. I experienced all sorts of problems while on them. /p
pWhat do you all think of the drug/alcohol reference? Could there be relevance in certain instances? The "world" drinks, and I don't think it's changed over time. Could this have been a stretch on the part of the writer, a chance to berate careless, pregnant moms? Or is there medical evidence to support this in any way?/p
p[This message has been edited by ColleenMarie (edited March 21, 2000).]/p

Posted on: Tue, 03/21/2000 - 9:40pm
kalpertk's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/30/1999 - 09:00

pI think the drug alcohol reference was just placing the show in the time frame that it belonged. Remember these characters would have been teenagers in the late 60's 70's. Also, I ate very well during pregnancy, did not drink. However, I did eat peanut butter, during pregnancy and nursing. But, there is also history of food allergies on both sides, both grandfathers had food allergies. One to peanut, although not anaphylactic. I think the show was a fair representation considering the time period that it was set./p

Posted on: Wed, 03/22/2000 - 2:48am
schierman's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/30/1999 - 09:00

pTo ColleenMarie: My wife got a uterine infection right after delivering our son. She was put on heavy doses of antibiotics. The doctors said it was safe for her to breastfeed, but I take that with a grain of salt. Ha anyone else had to take antibiotics during pregnancy or breastfeeding?/p
pMy wife was never a heavy peanut butter eater, but she did enjoy Chinese food often during her pregnancy and breastfeeding days. We suspect that the Chinese food had a lot of peanut oil that may have been the early exposure to our son./p

Posted on: Wed, 03/22/2000 - 3:33am
kristene's picture
Offline
Joined: 09/27/1999 - 09:00

pI thought the show was very good. It showed how serious a food allergy can be./p
pI think the mom was just beating herself up over the PA, just like moms always do. Anytime anything happens to one of my boys, I blame myself. I don't think there was any serious intent behind it./p
pKristene/p
pp.s. Did the teacher really dismiss the allergy? I must have missed that part. It looked like she believed him in the part I saw. She said it was the boys "mortal enemy" or something like that./p

Posted on: Wed, 03/22/2000 - 11:14pm
Mary Kay's picture
Offline
Joined: 01/25/1999 - 09:00

pThe show "Freaks and Geeks" has been canceled as of yesterday (March 22). I am sure it was not anything to do with the subject matter of Monday night's episode, but it had very low viewership. So I guess not too many people saw how serious a peanut allergy can actually be./p
p------------------br /
Mary Kay/p

Posted on: Wed, 03/22/2000 - 11:57pm
Hope's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/29/1999 - 09:00

pScheirman..an interesting question...I did not consume peanut butter during pregnancy or alcohol or caffiene. I nursed my daughter after she was born and when she was about 2 months old I got a breast infection and was put on antibiotics. The doctor said this is common and is caused by a plugged duct in the breast. I wanted to stop nursing her but he said it wouldn't affect her...she is now PA. I did not have to take any antibiotics with my other child and she has no allergies. I nursed both of my children until they were 14 months old. (It is interesting that one of the benefits they promote breastfeeding with is it heightens the baby's defense against allergies)./p
pWe have no known history of any allergies in our families - environmental, food or otherwise, but I am curious of the alcohol connection. While non of my brothers or sisters or I drink, our parents are heavy drinkers. Out of their nine grandchildren 2 have allergies - 1 PA and one environmental./p
pBeing a naturally curious person I have always wondered what caused her to get it...genetics, my diet during pregnancy, something in her, family medical history...I am begining to believe it is an elusive answer./p

Posted on: Thu, 03/23/2000 - 10:17am
mew's picture
mew
Offline
Joined: 02/08/2000 - 09:00

pIt is not uncommon to take antibiotics during pregnancy or nursing. Antibiotics are usually given during delivery if the mother is a Group B Strep carrier (20-25% of women carry this and it can cause serious complications for the baby when antibiotics are not given - they often do a culture at about 7 months to test for it). They also give antibiotics to women who have mitral valve prolapse (a generally benign heart murmur which is common among women) during c-sections to prevent life-threatening heart valve infections in the mother. Urinary tract infections and sinus infections are common during pregnancy and these are also treated with antibiotics./p
pI think if you are genetically predisposed to allergies, you may be more likely to have antibiotic allergies (or likely to manifest the allergy earlier in life than you would have otherwise due to the earlier exposure). But, I don't think this would predispose you to peanut allergy./p

Posted on: Thu, 03/23/2000 - 1:16pm
ColleenMarie's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/04/2000 - 09:00

pmew: your profile doesn't indicate your profession but I'm curious. Certainly we don't want to throw "off-the-wall" things out there as potential causes of pa. On the other hand, I think it's really important that we, as a strong network, discuss possible connections and see if we can find links. That's what science is all about./p
pI'm not convinced that these connections are being completely explored by the experts. Maybe they are, but if that were the case, wouldn't we all have been contacted in order to compare our backgrounds? /p
pThere must be a partial answer somewhere. Allergies are so elusive, and I just want to make sure we don't "shoot down" any theories unless they are *certain* to be unfounded./p
pDo you work in the medical field? Please tell us more if you do. Do you just "think" antibiotics wouldn't predispose a nursed baby or is there strong evidence to disprove the hypothesis? Could it be an element of the puzzle (when combined with other elements, perhaps alcoholism in the family line)./p
pI was never on antibiotics during pregnancy or while nursing, but my system was weakened by birth control pills and I became pregant as soon as I stopped taking them. It may be far-fetched, but I can't know that for sure until I "compare notes" with other moms with pa children who also became pregnant immediately after discontinuing birth control pills. Any out there?/p
pP.S. I'm sad that the show was cancelled. That is a shame. But at least it's a beginning. Plus, for every person who DID watch it, we can chalk one more up to being educated!/p
p[This message has been edited by ColleenMarie (edited March 23, 2000).]/p

Posted on: Thu, 03/23/2000 - 10:17pm
Christine's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/03/1999 - 09:00

pColleen,br /
How did birth control pills "weaken" your system? I've never heard of them doing this to people. Did you have that confirmed by a doctor? I got pregnant twice while taking birth control pills. I was using a low-dose pill that is really NOT used for contraception but it is all that I could tolerate. Its efficacy rate is about 93% vs. close to 100% like normal birth control pills. Obviously, I fell into the 7% area twice!!! Anyway, one of my kids has no allergies, the other has many. I do not believe, in my case that my diet or prescription drug use had anything to do with it. I believe it was genetic in that I suffer from environmental allergens as does my husband. The real miracle is that one of my children does NOT have allergies. I think you are correct in your statement that the medical community has not/will not look into all the varying theories as to why these allergies is exist. I believe this is mainly because there are a few good theories out there as to why allergies are caused in MOST of the population:/p
p1) We have less illness in the world today due to vaccines and medications. The immune system needs to "keep busy". If it is busy fighting diseases it will not overact to other things. If it is not busy fighting illness it tends to start fighting other things it doesn't need to./p
p2) Heredity. There is a genetic tendancy to be allergic and that is passed down through families. What the actual allergen might be is different for each individual--what is common though is the ability to be allergic (overactive immune system). Allergies are due to an overactive immune system not a weak one. /p
p3) Excess ingestion of peanuts during pregnancy and breastfeeding. This may cause particular food allergies in those people that fall into category number 2 above./p
pAs far as having the medical community check out whether uses of birth control pills, antibiotic directly cause allergies I doubt they will do so unless the data is astounding enough to cause them to and to refute any of the more widely believed theories.br /
Christine/p

Posted on: Fri, 03/24/2000 - 5:12am
CVB in CA's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/15/1999 - 09:00

pRegarding "drug abuse". Former and current drug users seem quite willing to verbally beat themselves up about past use and their kids health. I've heard it speculated as cause of a heart murmur, diabetes, whatever. I think people who feel guilty often lump all guilt together under emotional stress and spill it all out. I've heard it more than once from more than one person, and it often verges on the absurd. My child is ADD because I blanked!, My child is ....whatever.!br /
There are some drug abuse results that have beconme very well documented such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, etc. but I don't think peanut allergy is one of them! Certainly not in my child's case, but I can only speak for my own habits./p

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

Cookies are one of life’s little indulgences. And just because you have an allergy or sensitivity to eggs shouldn’t mean that you sit on the...

Soymilk is one of the most popular alternatives to cow’s milk. As well as being rich in fiber, soy is a great source of protein and contains all...

Whether you have a child with a peanut allergy or you are sensitive to packing a nut-free lunch out of concern for other people’s children, it is...

Peanut oil is an inexpensive, healthful and inoffensive way to cook—unless you have a peanut allergy!

Light peanut oil is popular as a...

Olive oil has many benefits and surprisingly few side effects. It is derived from the olive and is popular with people around the world. The...