Trying to make school completely pn/nut free-need help and advice!

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 3:20am
maddiesmom's picture
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Joined: 12/20/1999 - 09:00

Long story, I apologize, but could use some advice and help from anyone who has gone through this, I will try to make the story short...
7 yr old DD is in a pn/nut free classroom at her current school (which is only 1rst and 2nd grade). We have a 504 and the school has been great in accomodating her allergies. She sits at a pn/nut free table at lunch,etc. She has been "safe", no severe reactions, but has had 15 bad hive reactions over the last year. Now my allergist and dr. are telling me that she should be in a completely pn/nut free school due to the severity of her allergy and that she is having touch reactions. He, the allergist, actually said I am making her allergies WORSE because of all the reactions she has had. The hives have occured OUTSIDE of her class environment-they happen during PE, art, etc.

Now, next year she is off to another school (3rd, 4th, 5th grade) and I am starting the process of trying to make it COMPLETELY pn/nut free-meaning no peanut buter or nuts allowed in cafeteria and in classrooms for snacks-I met with the superintendent of schools last week and she is willing to hear us and meet with us again next week. Our district has Food Allergy Guidelines, but hasn't attempted being peanut/nut free. I did research online and found 5 schools that are pn/nut free and I have started to call them to get info on how they did it. I know that our small town folks will make their voices heard, those "peanut lovers", but I am willing to do this to make her safe. I haven't told anyone that I am starting the process to avoid chaos and trouble in town.

I understand that if the school says it is pn/nut free is not 100% guarenteed-but I can't keep subjecting my child to reactions from contaminated door knobs and items in school. I am hoping that it will deter anyone from sending pn snacks/lunches in and it will diminish her hive reactions.

Any advice, comments, or help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for reading this long post.
Shandra

(edited to try to make the post shorter...sorry)

[This message has been edited by maddiesmom (edited April 10, 2006).]

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 7:36am
qdebbie1's picture
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Joined: 02/10/2005 - 09:00

Make sure the letter from your allergist is very specific about the absolute life and death requirement for pn/tn free. If these needs are ordered by the doctor it is best.

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 8:55am
maddiesmom's picture
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Joined: 12/20/1999 - 09:00

Yes, my allergist's letter states that due to the fact that she is so touch sensitive, that "my recommendation is that Madeline be placed in a school that is completely peanut/nut free" and then he goes on to explain that "pn residue on hands/clothing, even in other classrooms, will make her have a reaction from the traces left on doornobs, faucet handles, etc. "
Hope it will make the Superintendent pay attention....not sure if it will be all it takes, I think it is going to be a fight.

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 12:18pm
KS mom's picture
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Joined: 03/02/2006 - 09:00

Hi Maddies mom! Your daughters situation sounds very much like my daughters a few years ago. She is 11 now but at about age 7 she began having so many reactions at school that I would have to pick her up sometimes several times a week. At the time, her classroom was pf but it seemed whenever the children did anything outside of the classroom (art, pe, activities with other grades, etc) she would end up having a reaction. Some were just a few hives, itchy eyes and mouth, and terribly runny nose (water pouring out). Then she began having what I considered to be more severe reactions. She had more hives, wheezing and dizziness. The principal witnessed these reactions and decided that she had to do something to make dd safer. So she made the school peanut free or actually I think they refer to it as peanut safe (something like that)...legalities! It made a huge difference in the amount of reactions. I was fortunate that the principal took it upon herself to make the school pf. She got some opposition from a few of the parents but in general people understood and supported the principals decision. She even followed up with a survey to get reactions which was great too because we found out that a couple of parents said that they would defy the policy and send pb in regardless so the teachers new who to watch out for.
We now homeschool. Its not necessarily because of allergies but as a side benefit I can see that my daughters stress level has gone down regarding her allergies.
I hope that things work out for your daughter. I understand how stressful and frustrating it can be!

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 7:36am
qdebbie1's picture
Offline
Joined: 02/10/2005 - 09:00

Make sure the letter from your allergist is very specific about the absolute life and death requirement for pn/tn free. If these needs are ordered by the doctor it is best.

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 8:55am
maddiesmom's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/20/1999 - 09:00

Yes, my allergist's letter states that due to the fact that she is so touch sensitive, that "my recommendation is that Madeline be placed in a school that is completely peanut/nut free" and then he goes on to explain that "pn residue on hands/clothing, even in other classrooms, will make her have a reaction from the traces left on doornobs, faucet handles, etc. "
Hope it will make the Superintendent pay attention....not sure if it will be all it takes, I think it is going to be a fight.

Posted on: Mon, 04/10/2006 - 12:18pm
KS mom's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/02/2006 - 09:00

Hi Maddies mom! Your daughters situation sounds very much like my daughters a few years ago. She is 11 now but at about age 7 she began having so many reactions at school that I would have to pick her up sometimes several times a week. At the time, her classroom was pf but it seemed whenever the children did anything outside of the classroom (art, pe, activities with other grades, etc) she would end up having a reaction. Some were just a few hives, itchy eyes and mouth, and terribly runny nose (water pouring out). Then she began having what I considered to be more severe reactions. She had more hives, wheezing and dizziness. The principal witnessed these reactions and decided that she had to do something to make dd safer. So she made the school peanut free or actually I think they refer to it as peanut safe (something like that)...legalities! It made a huge difference in the amount of reactions. I was fortunate that the principal took it upon herself to make the school pf. She got some opposition from a few of the parents but in general people understood and supported the principals decision. She even followed up with a survey to get reactions which was great too because we found out that a couple of parents said that they would defy the policy and send pb in regardless so the teachers new who to watch out for.
We now homeschool. Its not necessarily because of allergies but as a side benefit I can see that my daughters stress level has gone down regarding her allergies.
I hope that things work out for your daughter. I understand how stressful and frustrating it can be!

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