Trouble w/nurse signing up for Kindergarten

Posted on: Thu, 03/22/2007 - 11:58pm
mommyofmatt's picture
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First off, sorry I'm only posting when I need something these days...it's all I have time for at the moment. I'll be back with words of wisdom when I have more time (try to contain yourselves with the excitement [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img])

Anyway. My town is supposed to be very progressive with allergies. Uh. Huh. DH and I met with the Principal a while back...the meeting went well overall. He brought up a 504 plan. I was thrilled. My ds is MFA, with milk being anaphylactic in addition to peanut.

Fast forward to registration day. Handed in my forms. Wasn't expecting to get into any conversations about anything other than do you have this form? It was being held in the office with people constantly parading in and out. The nurse started quizzing me. Wanting me to tell her on a form that had 4 lines allowed what accommodations I wanted for my ds. I wrote TBD, told her we couldn't possibly cover everything at this moment. Don't think she liked it.

She told me they don't read labels, sending home a letter requesting no peanuts doesn't mean it will be adhered to, false sense of security, blah, blah, couldn't believe my ears, blah.

I won't relay the entire conversation, but you get the idea. Spoke to my allergist, he was quite surprised and offered to back me up if I need it. We're going to follow up with the Principal re: 504 now that he's registered, and see where it goes.

But I gotta tell ya: I'm sooooo glad I've been reading this site for almost 3 years now. She was trying to steamroll me, and no luck [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

This part is more of a vent, and can you !@#$% believe this?!

Next part: question:

Our goal is to keep the blatant nut products out of the room for snack. Honestly, I'm not sure what they are because we buy so little commercially packaged food due to ds' MFA.

Here is what I think are the blatant peanutty snack foods (I'm not going to worry about may contains right now);

Cereal bars, granola bars, pb crackers, nutterbutter cookies, pb oreos. What else? Anything?

Thanks. Let the games begin.

[This message has been edited by mommyofmatt (edited March 23, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 12:18am
Greenlady's picture
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"They don't read labels"????? What the heck does that mean?
I'd say, if the the label has the word "peanut" in the list of ingredients, then it is a peanut product. If the teacher can't read a label, she's in the wrong profession. If the teacher is unwilling or unable to accept the liability for reading the label, then have the nurse clear all foods first.
Or, if this is too hard for them, then have a food-free classroom.
Good luck!

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 12:28am
mommyofmatt's picture
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Oh. I hear ya Greenlady. Believe me. I want to have an idea of all peanutty snacks for the letter to parents.
I guess we should also include safe snack suggestions to be helpful [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Snack ideas?

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 1:11am
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In my opinion it is their "obligation" to read labels. On the bottom of the list of safe snacks I provided to our school, I listed the following:
NOT safe snacks:
This list is not extensive, but merely a list of common products that are NOT safe.
*No peanut butter/nuts/trail mix
*No products that do not have a list of ingredients
*No baked goods
*No donuts
*No M&Ms, plain OR peanut
*No Ritz-bitz sandwich crackers
*No cheese and cracker sandwich packs
*No generic brands
*No Little Debbie products
Like a previous poster indicated. If the teacher does not want to be responsible for reading labels or minimally looking at the safe snack list, then the school needs to hire someone who will perform that function OR no food in the classroom.
The school nurse told me last year when we were getting my DS enrolled in kindergarten "we cannot guarantee a peanut-free classroom". I explained to her that I understand there are no guarantees, but they must do everything they can to "reduce the risk, including eliminating all peanut products from the classroom." She was a little taken back by my straightforward approach, but ironically I received an email from her about a month ago stating that she appreciated the way I advocated for my DS and that my DS is lucky to have me.
One child provides a the snack for the entire classroom from the safe list. I have been present before when the teacher has sent snacks back home with a student because it was not on the list. She just circles the word peanut on the package and sends it right back home. It has forced me to trust this teacher to give my son only food from the list, but it has worked out very well this year. We will have to reevaluate as we go forward.
Good luck with this!

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 2:56am
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I don't agree with the "no generic brands" thing.
We use a lot of generic brands safely. It's not any more difficult to track down allergen info on generic brands than name brands.
In as much as I support peanut/tree nut bans with young children, the day that someone tells me that I can't buy generics (when generics are often safer for my kids allergy sets) is the day that I complain.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 3:04am
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Most here recommend getting qualified for 504 first before attempting to discuss accomodations...so other than things that may need to be handled immediately like am session placement and a placement with the more knowlegeable teacher i'd recommend taking 1 battle at a time. At our school there will never be daily snack in my kids' rooms therefore all food activities can be planned and coordinated.
luvmyboys

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 4:17am
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Quote:Originally posted by solarflare:
[b]I don't agree with the "no generic brands" thing.
We use a lot of generic brands safely. It's not any more difficult to track down allergen info on generic brands than name brands.
In as much as I support peanut/tree nut bans with young children, the day that someone tells me that I can't buy generics (when generics are often safer for my kids allergy sets) is the day that I complain.
[/b]
This list is for parents of non-allergy kids bringing snacks into the classroom. PA only. Since there are countless generic brands available, it is impossible for me to call each one to verify the manufacturing processes to list whether or not it is safe.
I am not sure what you are so angry about. This is just a list of things that many people with PA feel uncertain about. Perhaps it is just a comfort zone thing.
Also, this is just for purchasing ONE snack per month for the entire class. This has nothing to do with lunch or comfort zones at home. Feel free to modify my "suggession" as you see appropriate.
*No wonder I often pause before offering advice on this message board..there is no shortage of people who offer no practical advice and just sit back and pick other people apart*

Posted on: Fri, 03/23/2007 - 12:37pm
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I understand comfort zones and all that, but what if there is another FA student in the class that can't have certain things on your safe list?
I've been there, done that. Requires flexibility, and saying "absolutely no generics) is inflexible.
Over the years, I've had to go out of my way to check the safety of certain products that my son's classmates have asked me about.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 1:52am
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My DD is in 1st grade. The way our school handles it is this: everyone brings their own snack. A letter goes home at orientation night saying that because there is a child (this year, children, plural) with a life-threatening allergy to peanuts in the classroom, there can be no food with peanuts or peanut butter in the classroom. They don't ask nicely, "please try not to send it". They don't say "we have a peanut ban." They say it's a peanut-free classroom and snacks cannot have peanuts or peanut butter in them. If the teacher finds that someone brought it anyway, she says, "Oh, we can't have that in here" and makes them return it to their backpack to bring home. I think it's happened one time each school year. We don't say no may-contains or no homemade things. Just nothing obviously peanutty. They can eat it for lunch in the cafeteria. For birthday treats, still nothing with peanuts, but the PA kids have safe treat bags from home kept in the classroom so that the teacher doesn't have to read labels and make the decision about whether it's safe for the allergic kids. I think this set-up works great.

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 3:47am
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Honestly, I think trying to police what is brought it is a nightmare. I know what my sons eats is always safe....but how in the world can I tell others what to and not to bring?? The poor teacher has enough on her plate with a room over loeaded with kids, and now I need her to read labels of other snacks on top of it all. This is a problem for next year in our situation. This year, in Kindergarten, the parents all bring in a snack shared amongst the other kids(HUGE costco sized snacks). The teacher reads the label, no peanuts or nuts listed, then it's fine to serve(generic of not). My son still has his own snack regardless what the other kids are eating.
Now next year, the kids will be allowed to bring their own snacks. This is where the school and I are locked on what to do. I want them to all take their snacks(whatever they want to bring, I don't care) and go to the lunchroom, then wash hands and return to class. No one will have to worry about labels, about snacks, about letters home, about okay and not okay lists of foods...it doesn't matter!!!!!!!!! Eat it out of the classroom and eat whatever the heck they want. The school doesn't think they have time to do that every day...I'm going to request they try it, once, see if it works. But if they still say "no"...I honestly don't see how any of this would be safe. There is no way a teacher can police what is brought in, there is no way I can trust parents to even read a label for their child, parents at this school will NOT do that. There is no way they'd let me type up a list telling them what they can't bring...OMG I could imagine the hostility involved with that. Not to mention the district will not imply a ban on any food, even in the classroom. So they can ask "please try not to send peanuts" but if they are sent, they are allowed to be eaten. SO DO IT IN THE LUNCHROOM, NOT THE CLASSROOM!
Anwyays JMO!!!!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 5:44am
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Quote:Originally posted by solarflare:
[b]I don't agree with the "no generic brands" thing.
We use a lot of generic brands safely. It's not any more difficult to track down allergen info on generic brands than name brands.
In as much as I support peanut/tree nut bans with young children, the day that someone tells me that I can't buy generics (when generics are often safer for my kids allergy sets) is the day that I complain.
[/b]
Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:[b]
This list is for parents of non-allergy kids bringing snacks into the classroom. PA only. Since there are countless generic brands available, it is impossible for me to call each one to verify the manufacturing processes to list whether or not it is safe.
I am not sure what you are so angry about. This is just a list of things that many people with PA feel uncertain about. Perhaps it is just a comfort zone thing.
Also, this is just for purchasing ONE snack per month for the entire class. This has nothing to do with lunch or comfort zones at home. Feel free to modify my "suggession" as you see appropriate.
*No wonder I often pause before offering advice on this message board..there is no shortage of people who offer no practical advice and just sit back and pick other people apart*[/b]
Here is something practical to think about. Demand anything more than having people eliminate the allergen from the label, including "may contains" or "processed ons" and you lose something you can't afford to: [i]credibility[/i]. You start to ramble in your explanations. Keep it short, sweet and to the point. (Yeah, I know, MommaBear talking)
But like I said, btdt. If my child is of the sensitivity where labelling requirements aren't enough to keep him safe when he is merely in the room with something that doesn't have what he is allergic to written anywhere on the label, I'm going to have to consider a homebound designation.
Sure, "food free" might work, but there is that credibility issue. I guess people might wonder why [i]the rest of the school suddenly becomes safe[/i]. Sure, you can start to explain why you feel it's a more limited risk (might not be), but we begin to ramble. Tell people they aren't entitled to an explanation (504's IEP's etc,) and not only do you lose credibility, you look like an overlord. Both losing situatios, IMHO. No advice, IMMV.

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 11:14am
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MB I agree with you...it is very hard to explain the complexities of allergy management to those not dealing with it.
No snack in the classroom is the way my school does it, and I'm not about to argue =)
However ds#2's preschool (which is supposed to be peanut free), merely has ds sit at an allergy table. He brings his own snack. Despite the peanut policy his own teacher brought in granola bars with peanuts in them and the label was covered in warnings. I happened to be there that day or I never would have known. Provide your own snack, keep surfaces safe and do your best to enforce label reading, realizing at some point an error is bound to be made (but at least a 504 will make label reading a requirement not just an offer out of the kindness of their hearts).
One more thing, you may want to offer a list of suggested snacks. Have it come from the teacher. I say this merely because those used to eating peanuts all the time actually do find it hard to find a safe snack! A quick little list may result in fewer safety issues because busy parents will glance at the list and choose something rather than try to figure out an original idea.
Luvmyboys

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 11:19am
solarflare's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b] This list is for parents of non-allergy kids bringing snacks into the classroom. PA only. Since there are countless generic brands available, it is impossible for me to call each one to verify the manufacturing heat, soy, egg, peanut, tree nut, oat, sesprocesses to list whether or not it is safe.
[/b]
The thing that I failed to make clear in both of my other replies is that the list you're providing is only safe for your child, and does NOT take into account the possible food allergies of any other student.
If your "name brand only" list contains many things that another student is allergic to, it's probably not going to be fair.
I've been there, done that. The preschool that we use has a "parents bring in snack on a rotating basis" thing going.
I don't think my son has ever been in a class where he was the only child with food allergies, so I'm kind of biased to that extent.
What has worked for us in those communal snack situations is to either provide safe snacks for our children and the teacher requests that other parents not send in the things our kids are ana to.
------------------
Cheryl, mom to Jason (9 MFA including peanuts, tree nuts, shellfish and egg)
Joey (7 NKA)
Allison (4 milk allergic, suspect shellfish, avoiding PN/TN for now)
Ryan (1) nka *knock on wood*

Posted on: Sat, 03/24/2007 - 11:33pm
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Thanks for all your replies folks. You've given me different angles to think about.
I'm hoping the nurse was just having a bad day because many of the things she said were totally contradictory with what the principal told us...
Notnutty, since your snack is a shared one, I totally understand why you want to make it as safe as possible for your ds with no generics etc. FWIW, we don't buy generics either [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] And, if there aren't any other food allergies in the classroom, and the school has agreed to your list, I think you're in great shape [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Hopefully, you won't run into other food allergies which may conflict with some of your not safe list as Solarflare mentioned.
In our case, the snacks will be brought from home, eaten individually and not shared. That is why I'm only hoping to keep out the blatant nut products and perhaps the messiest milk ones -- although that may be wishful thinking.
And as far as the whole label reading thing...they're not reading labels, but separating kids in classroom based on obvious nut products (visually) and if uncertain, treating it as nut products. Makes no sense to me. They're also having kids wash hands, tables cleaned etc after snack. So...they're still making decisions on precautions without reading labels.
Just sounds to me like they don't want to deal with complaining parents. Chanda, you got me thinking about food free rooms, and how long they allow for eating. Their morning snack and bathroom break is only TEN MINUTES [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] so not reading labels may be a time factor as well.
Bethc: You described exactly what I want for my ds. Hopefully it will work out!
Luvmyboys: In total agreement with getting designation first.
MB: I agree with you completely that with a snack that is consumed individually, the label should be a sufficient guide.
Will keep you all posted... Meg

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 12:05am
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Quote:Originally posted by mommyofmatt:
[b]
Notnutty, since your snack is a shared one, I totally understand why you want to make it as safe as possible for your ds with no generics etc. FWIW, we don't buy generics either [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] And, if there aren't any other food allergies in the classroom, and the school has agreed to your list, I think you're in great shape [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Hopefully, you won't run into other food allergies which may conflict with some of your not safe list as Solarflare mentioned.[/b]
I'm thinking that given the prevalence of food allergies, notnutty is benefitting from another parent's flexibility, possibly a parent who is very much like solarflare, a parent she thinks is not giving practical advice. Ironic yes? Given confidentiality laws, and individual plans, no one can say for certain how many allergies are in their child's class....
Quote:[b]
MB: I agree with you completely that with a snack that is consumed individually, the label should be a sufficient guide.
[/b]
Let me be very clear. My child has never eaten anything at school that was deemed "safe" by a staff member reading a label. That's toying with my child's life. I've posted numerous instances where staff DID bring in incidentals, (holiday's etc,) and give them to my child thinking they were safe either because they "read the label" or were the same brand name (not size) off an "approved list". Several of these "incidentals" were items he brought home to me, not trusting them, and WOULD have been deadly if he ate them. I had to do some re-educating, or attempted to, but I was just met with either sighs, rolling eyes, or a blank stare. They were just waiting for me to stop babbling. Not listening.
Any "approved list" I had previously, involved me actually comming in to [b]physically inspect, read the label, and approve[/b]. Stuff had to come in original packaging for parties. Not picked out of a "multi flavor" chocolate bar bag. KWIM?
In my humble opinion? It's NEVER SAFE to allow school staff or other school parents to make those decisions for you or a child, especially a child who cannot read, or isn't as savvy at label reading yet, and work only off an "Approved list". Too much room for error. In ways you can't even anticipate even as a seasoned parent of a food allergic child. Murphy's law. Unless you're naive about food allergies, you could never imagine the ways they "don't get it", until it happens. It's just not how we think, YK? It's just not a point we get to. Or are people saying their young children are adept at making those final judgement calls for themselves in school? What age? When? Anyone want to start a thread? Is there already a thread?
I could never trade my peace of mind or my son's safety in order to prove a point, demand "fairness", enforce federal laws, or pave the way.
In reference to what you and some others agreed with me on, [b]I am inferring I would still send my child with his OWN snack. [/b] Not have him eat the "allowed" one. [i]Unless I deemed "the class snack" safe after physically inspecting it and reading the label immediately prior to serving it.[/i] Maybe I should have point blank said that. And with that scenario, you will STILL lose SOME credibility, if you are not careful.
Lose credibility, sacrifice cooperation and people's open minds. Don't underestimate the value of it. A lot of people, including those in positions of authority, can't get past why you trust some products and not others that are labelled similarly. For what it's worth, and not advice, I couldn't use the whole "generic" argument, since, my cabinets are loaded with various generic items. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/redface.gif[/img]
No advice, just how I personally feel, and what's in my cabinet. Individual Mileage May Vary. If there is anything I keep short and sweet for the school OUT OF NECESSITY, it's "DO NOT EVER, EVER, E.V.E.R. FEED MY CHILD."
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited March 25, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 1:05am
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MB: Wait a sec...I was referring to all kids bringing their own snack from home. I am NOT by any means planning on letting any one give my ds any food!!! Guess I wasn't clear. Meg

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 1:22am
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I agree with the NEVER, EVER FEED MY CHILD!! That is my rule too. he will ALWAYS have his own food, I don't care if there is a safe list or not, he will only eat what I put in his backpack that morning. I do understand the reason behind these lists are for the *other* kids in class to eat, right?? I have to agree with mommabears first post
"""Demand anything more than having people eliminate the allergen from the label, including "may contains" or "processed ons" and you lose something you can't afford to: credibility."""
I think if you start saying this brand is okay in this size, but this one isn't and this flavor is okay but this one isn't....it just gets too confusing. These are busy parents, busy teachers, you have to keep it simple. If it says PEANUTS on the label then...I don't know. In my school, they CAN bring those in....I don't want them in his classroom...eat them in the lunchroom. I am having problems becaue it WILL come into the classroom and there is nothing I can do about it. The school did say I could make a list of safe foods that I could give the parents to consult(but if they didn't want it was their right)...do you think any of these parents would look twice at this list, take it with them to the store, or hang it in the kitchen to refer to in the future HECK NO!!!
I don't know, my solution is keep the food out of the classroom, then there's no lists, no policing, no label reading. I am going to offer I come to school EVERY DAY and walk the class to the lunchroom while the teacher stays and prepares whatever for when they return, if I do that will they consider it??? I honestly think there is no time difference in either approach. The kids can grab their snacks, walk to the lunchroom(the walk would take maybe 2min's) sit down and eat visit....5 min tops, wash hands and be back in class....15min tops. So in class they get their snacks out, teacher needs to read some questionable labels, swap some snacks that weren't allowed...eat, visit, kids wash tables after, wash hands....all that in 15 min??? I don't think so!
I think keeping ALL foods out of the classroom, off markers, off floors, off books, off playdoh, off chairs....out weighs the extra minute or two to eat in the lunchroom. My daughter has seen classes doing *stuff* while eating, can you imagine the food residue int hat room...and they want me to allow this???? Sorry I am really thinking out loud here...getting my words ready for the school, I have to think this through from every angle! THANKS [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited March 25, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 1:38am
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Quote:Originally posted by mommyofmatt:
[b]MB: Wait a sec...I was referring to all kids bringing their own snack from home. I am NOT by any means planning on letting any one give my ds any food!!! Guess I wasn't clear. Meg[/b]
nonono, I was just clarifying if you thought the label was sufficient to determine if a snack brought in for the whole class to consume was safe. I wasn't sure about what you meant about "individually". You know, if you meant a snack brought in for the whole class could be given to the allergic child if the label appeared safe. Guess that's clear now. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 3:01am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] Let me be very clear. My child has never eaten anything at school that was deemed "safe" by a staff member reading a label. [/b]
This was the same situation for us during elementary school. *I* pre-approved anything Mariah ate.
But we've changed that once DD got the 504 designation and started Middle School. I no longer approve the food. Now any food served/used in the classroom is approved by [i]both [/i]the Director of Food Services [i]and [/i]the School Nurse.

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 3:04am
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No time for a long post as I am out of town and borrowed a computer just to check email, but this sentence really struck me from Chanda4: "The school did say I could make a list of safe foods that I could give the parents to consult(but if they didn't want it was their right)...do you think any of these parents would look twice at this list, take it with them to the store, or hang it in the kitchen to refer to in the future HECK NO!!"
This sentence really bothers me. It is not up to the parent to pass a safe list out to the parents. It is up to the school to do it. I think this just causes other parents to get angry at the pa parent, which I know is what happened to you (Chanda4). The school should be passing out the safe list. All the rules related to the pa should be presented as coming from the school, not the parent of the pa child.
In elementary school, our teacher sent home a letter every year with the rules coming from her. I don`t have it with me since I am out of town, but it went something like this:
"Dear Parents,
This year we have a child in our class who is severely allergic to peanuts. For someone who is severely allergic to peanuts, even the smell or contact with a small amount of residue can cause a severe reaction. I am doing my part to reduce the risk by requesting that parents not send in food with peanuts."
I don`t recall the rest right now. Mommyofmatt, you have the letter. It was in the pile of stuff I mailed you when I mailed you dd`s 504. You can post the rest of it if you want.
I also remember another note going home about birthdays with a suggested safe list. It said something like "if you want to bring in a treat that everyone can eat, the following items are safe". It did not require it. It was suggested and most people did follow it.
I totally agree about the food free room. When your child is MFA and not just pa, it becomes even more clear cut. Almost anything the other kids eat will have either milk, eggs, or peanuts in them. They do move from station to station quite a bit in the room. If they do this while eating, everything is contaminated, so a peanut free zone in the classroom is not really effective. It was very common in elementary school for kids to be separated into groups for various things, and dd could be sitting anywhere in the room.

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 3:26am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] This was the same situation for us during elementary school. *I* pre-approved anything Mariah ate.
But we've changed that once DD got the 504 designation and started Middle School. I no longer approve the food. Now any food served/used in the classroom is approved by [i]both [/i]the Director of Food Services [i]and [/i]the School Nurse. [/b]
so you have no say whatsoever? I'm assuming Mariah can refuse...
Anywhooo. I might consider it [i]to a point[/i] if my school nurse had been on the job longer than a month. (LOL) She recently sent me "epipen administration" forms. I'm assuming she's still a "newbie" and can't find the ones I turned in earlier this year. We don't have a "Director of Food Services". The "Hot Lunch Moms" run the show. (They bring in "fast food" a few times a month for the entire school) I think they are having a hard time working around the "Wellness Policy". I'd offer to help, but I don't believe in what they are doing. I was told by their leader their goal was to be able to "see their children, in their [i]environment[/i]". I told her (thinking: "[i]what a crock[/i]")[i]: "You can come in any day lunch is served, sit and eat lunch with your child in the lunchroom." [/i] paraphrased. (I verified this with the principal who oversaw our meeting and was sitting right next to me.) Great satisfaction when I pointed that out, I admit. I think I made an enemy of her at that moment, but it was sooooooooooooooooo worth it. Not like we were best buds to begin with. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 3:50am
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Quote:Originally posted by Carefulmom:
[b]No time for a long post as I am out of town and borrowed a computer just to check email, but this sentence really struck me from Chanda4: "The school did say I could make a list of safe foods that I could give the parents to consult(but if they didn't want it was their right)...do you think any of these parents would look twice at this list, take it with them to the store, or hang it in the kitchen to refer to in the future HECK NO!!"
This sentence really bothers me. It is not up to the parent to pass a safe list out to the parents. It is up to the school to do it. I think this just causes other parents to get angry at the pa parent, which I know is what happened to you (Chanda4). The school should be passing out the safe list. All the rules related to the pa should be presented as coming from the school, not the parent of the pa child.
In elementary school, our teacher sent home a letter every year with the rules coming from her. I don`t have it with me since I am out of town, but it went something like this:
"Dear Parents,
This year we have a child in our class who is severely allergic to peanuts. For someone who is severely allergic to peanuts, even the smell or contact with a small amount of residue can cause a severe reaction. I am doing my part to reduce the risk by requesting that parents not send in food with peanuts."
I don`t recall the rest right now. Mommyofmatt, you have the letter. It was in the pile of stuff I mailed you when I mailed you dd`s 504. You can post the rest of it if you want.
I also remember another note going home about birthdays with a suggested safe list. It said something like "if you want to bring in a treat that everyone can eat, the following items are safe". It did not require it. It was suggested and most people did follow it.
I totally agree about the food free room. When your child is MFA and not just pa, it becomes even more clear cut. Almost anything the other kids eat will have either milk, eggs, or peanuts in them. They do move from station to station quite a bit in the room. If they do this while eating, everything is contaminated, so a peanut free zone in the classroom is not really effective. It was very common in elementary school for kids to be separated into groups for various things, and dd could be sitting anywhere in the room.
[/b]
reraising for Adele.

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 4:04am
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carefulmom..the difference with my school though(they send the same letters aksing "Please make your best efforts to avoid sending foods to be shared with the class that contain the foods to which their classmates are allergic"...above is a blank to fill in Peanuts/Treenuts and Eggs)...but that's it. *IF* the parent wants to send in pb crackers...even though it's asked they make an effort not to, it won't be taken away or not allowed if they don't want to make the effort. There is no ban in our district. And it quite a apparent, that my school has parents that are NOT going to make an effort. I can guarentee if one of the *mean moms* has a child in my sons class, that child will be bringing in Cracker Jacks, pb crackers, reeces peanut butter cups...probably everyday, just to prove they can!!!
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 7:24am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] so you have no say whatsoever? I'm assuming Mariah can refuse...[/b]
Of course Mariah can refuse, but I don't think she ever has because she enjoys the 'treats'. . . and knows they are safe because her teacher tells her that they are.
Any food provided to students by staff or the Parent Association must be submitted in its original package to the school nurse who, upon deeming it 'safe', forwards it on to the Director of Food Services who also checks the ingredient label. If both approve it (documented), the teacher may use/serve that food. The teacher informs Mariah that the food has been approved per her 504 plan.
Almost always the teacher, nurse and/or the Director of Food Services includes me on the e-mail correspondence. So I have known about food use ahead of time. But one teacher didn't, as I don't require it in the 504 plan. I found out after-the-fact from Mariah. I did feel the need to follow up by requesting a copy of the approval from the nurse, who immediately obliged.
So no, I have no 'say'. <> Maybe I'm the 'bad mommy' LOL, but this is how I prefer it. Mariah is 13, and this is what works for her and us.
In elementary school I was often (always?) at the school reading the labels. But not any more. I haven't read a label at school since Mariah started Middle School (over 1.5 years).
[b]Anywhooo. I might consider it [i]to a point[/i] if my school nurse had been on the job longer than a month. (LOL) She recently sent me "epipen administration" forms. I'm assuming she's still a "newbie" and can't find the ones I turned in earlier this year. We don't have a "Director of Food Services". The "Hot Lunch Moms" run the show. (They bring in "fast food" a few times a month for the entire school) I think they are having a hard time working around the "Wellness Policy". I'd offer to help, but I don't believe in what they are doing. I was told by their leader their goal was to be able to "see their children, in their [i]environment[/i]". I told her (thinking: "[i]what a crock[/i]")[i]: "You can come in any day lunch is served, sit and eat lunch with your child in the lunchroom." [/i] paraphrased. (I verified this with the principal who oversaw our meeting and was sitting right next to me.) Great satisfaction when I pointed that out, I admit. I think I made an enemy of her at that moment, but it was sooooooooooooooooo worth it. Not like we were best buds to begin with. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img][/b]
[i]"Hot Lunch Moms" [/i] is just plain creepy. Unbelievable to me really.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 25, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 9:55am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]carefulmom..the difference with my school though(they send the same letters aksing "Please make your best efforts to avoid sending foods to be shared with the class that contain the foods to which their classmates are allergic"...above is a blank to fill in Peanuts/Treenuts and Eggs)...but that's it. *IF* the parent wants to send in pb crackers...even though it's asked they make an effort not to, it won't be taken away or not allowed if they don't want to make the effort. There is no ban in our district. And it quite a apparent, that my school has parents that are NOT going to make an effort. I can guarentee if one of the *mean moms* has a child in my sons class, that child will be bringing in Cracker Jacks, pb crackers, reeces peanut butter cups...probably everyday, just to prove they can!!!
[/b]
See, this is where I think it gets ridiculous. If there were Cracker Jacks and PB crackers coming into my kids' classroom, I'd have a major issue with that. There are several ways I can think of to handle this and I'm pretty sure I'd have the teacher and principal on my side pretty quick.

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 9:56am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] Of course Mariah can refuse, but I don't think she ever has because she enjoys the 'treats'. . . and knows they are safe because her teacher tells her that they are. [/b]
Honestly? I don't know what to say, except If this is the truth of the situation (treats are really safe), then I'm happy for you and Mariah. I will also say you probably built the district up to that point. It's not something they did on their own. I think, in some ways, I've been such a pain in.....well, you know....that the district has [i]made progress[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] Still, it was a backwards environment to begin with, definitely not "progressive", and I'm pretty sure my district is not capable of the situation you describe [i]at this point[/i]. Even if I took up residence in their inner most cavities.
Quote:[b]Any food provided to students by staff or the Parent Association must be submitted in its original package to the school nurse who, upon deeming it 'safe', forwards it on to the Director of Food Services who also checks the ingredient label. If both approve it (documented), the teacher may use/serve that food. The teacher informs Mariah that the food has been approved per her 504 plan. [/b]
Are the criteria the food must meet in her 504 plan? Or is it criteria the district has devised themselves?
Quote:[b]Almost always the teacher, nurse and/or the Director of Food Services includes me on the e-mail correspondence. So I have known about food use ahead of time. But one teacher didn't, as I don't require it in the 504 plan. I found out after-the-fact from Mariah. I did feel the need to follow up by requesting a copy of the approval from the nurse, who immediately obliged. [/b]
I'm sure she did. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] BTW, that 504C...she is gone, right?
Quote:[b]So no, I have no 'say'. <> Maybe I'm the 'bad mommy' LOL, but this is how I prefer it. Mariah is 13, and this is what works for her and us.[/b]
When did Mariah stop asking you to "double check" labels?
Quote:[b]In elementary school I was often (always?) at the school reading the labels. But not any more. I haven't read a label at school since Mariah started Middle School (over 1.5 years).[/b]
Whoops. Does this answer my last question? How did this transpire. What provoked it?
Quote:[b][i]"Hot Lunch Moms" [/i] is just plain creepy. Unbelievable to me really.[/b]
Completely understand. Kinda gives me the same feeling as when someone says: "Oh, look---carnies!"
You know what? I'll take your suggestion and get that book. Queen Bee something. I trust you that it's an informative read. Or at least confirms a thing or two. I might even buy a copy for the school resource library.

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 10:18am
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Quote:Originally posted by TwokidsNJ:
[b] See, this is where I think it gets ridiculous. If there were Cracker Jacks and PB crackers coming into my kids' classroom, I'd have a major issue with that. There are several ways I can think of to handle this and I'm pretty sure I'd have the teacher and principal on my side pretty quick.[/b]
but can I ask what all of you would do if the school didn't side with you...in this situation?? What should I do?????????????
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 3:26pm
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Quote:Originally posted by solarflare:
[b] The thing that I failed to make clear in both of my other replies is that the list you're providing is only safe for your child, and does NOT take into account the possible food allergies of any other student.
If your "name brand only" list contains many things that another student is allergic to, it's probably not going to be fair.
I've been there, done that. The preschool that we use has a "parents bring in snack on a rotating basis" thing going.
I don't think my son has ever been in a class where he was the only child with food allergies, so I'm kind of biased to that extent.
What has worked for us in those communal snack situations is to either provide safe snacks for our children and the teacher requests that other parents not send in the things our kids are ana to.
[/b]
There is another child in the class who was recently diagnosed milk allergic (January). When I found out we were dealing with more than just my son's PA, I offered to change the snack policy to accommodate this other child. The teacher told me "no, this is working great for DS, the other parent has provided an alternative snack for days the food is not safe for him". I have since asked more than once if they wanted to change the snack policy and the teacher keeps saying "no". I am in the classroom about 8 hours a week so I understand how much my ds's allergy affects snacktime.
Had I known there was another allergy I would have set this up differently to begin with. That is why I said we may have to change the policy going forward. I feel that I have always tried to be fair to other students' allergies, in fact I asked early on if we needed to accommodate for any other allergies and I was told "no". What else can I do then?
My DS is in kindergarten...so this is a new process to me. I set up a system that I thought would work for us, and so far it has.
I understand the "approved snack list" would not work for other allergies...but it was created to give the other parents a list in which to buy snacks safe for my DS to eat.
Perhaps I need to rethink this situation for 1st grade next year. Maybe I am putting too much trust in the teacher to "catch" a food that has not been approved by me...
Something to think about....

Posted on: Sun, 03/25/2007 - 11:57pm
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More to think about.
I remember the letter Carefulmom, maybe later I'll try to post it. No time now.
I agree with what you're saying about contamination and a food free room. I know that's going to be a battle for sure for me if that's what I pursue.
Notnutty: that's the challenge with lists...if you got a bunch of parents with food allergic children in a room, they may all have different brands/foods they trust. For example, my friend was offering to have a playdate for her dd with a little girl that has the same allergies as my ds. She was telling the other mom the "Safe" snacks she has in the house, and the other mom shot down most of my safe snacks [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]
I thought I had a tight comfort zone with food, this mom's was tighter...
Everyone bringing in their own snacks solves the list problem, but potentially creates a residue and clean up problem, and round and round we go...
MB: we're on the same page now [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] As for the hot lunch moms and the mean moms at Chanda's school....I'm at a loss. Hugs Chanda. I think you do need the school's enforcement in alot of the areas you're having problems so these broads...I mean...losers...I mean...ladies???? can realize they're out of high school [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/mad.gif[/img]
Meg

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 12:15am
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when there are multiple kids or even multiple allergies per child...these lists mean nothing, IMO. With multiple issues, it is just safer to take all foods elsewhere as not to contaminate the room your child is in 90% of the day. That's how I view it, I can't possibly keep all the kids from eating peanuts, tree nuts or eggs in any of their snacks(then throw in my younger son's(or another students), milk and soy into the mix...)it's impossible, really. I think that is a battle that could really never be 100%...and with food allergies, I need it to be 100%. (In our situation) if there is no food in the classroom, it's darn near 100% safe(I know, nothing is ever 100% safe....but close enough). If all food is consumed in the lunchroom, then the same safeguards that work for lunch, would now work for snack, or for b-day's. Just like at lunch Jake would have his own stuff that I approved, and the other kids, have no limits on what they can and can't bring(in our school) so I would think that set up would make everyone involved happy, no restrictions. But I am sure someone can prove me wrong...but as it stands I think that is the best solution(IMO-only).
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited March 26, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 12:55am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] If my child is of the sensitivity where labelling requirements aren't enough to keep him safe when he is merely in the room with something that doesn't have what he is allergic to written anywhere on the label, I'm going to have to consider a homebound designation.[/b]
I completely agree. Sorta like, [i]"Be careful what you ask for."[/i]
Quote:Originally posted by MB:
[b]Sure, "food free" might work, but there is that credibility issue. I guess people might wonder why [i]the rest of the school suddenly becomes safe[/i]. Sure, you can start to explain why you feel it's a more limited risk (might not be), but we begin to ramble. Tell people they aren't entitled to an explanation (504's IEP's etc,) and not only do you lose credibility, you look like an overlord. Both losing situatios, IMHO. No advice, IMMV. [/b]
Not necessarily. It depends on who requires the rule.
In my situation, the "no food in the classroom" was initiated and implemented [i]by the school.[/i] It was our assertion that label reading was necessary, and their assertion that label reading was too time consuming and cumbersome for staff to implement. They saw label reading interferring with the school's 'smooth functioning' (or something to that effect). So we requested label reading and the school asserted that it was not practical/implementable. "No food" was their solution because it was clear, consistent (a.k.a. universal), and implementable. We expressed concerns that there would be 'backlash' or resentment with this change, and in response the school spun the situation in their presentation (e.g. rationale was to keep the room clean, that lunch time was at a time that kids did not need a snack, etc).
No credibility issues here. Nope.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 26, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 2:02pm
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] Not necessarily. It depends on who requires the rule. [/b]
In my situation, the "no food in the classroom" was initiated and implemented [i]by the school.[/i] It was our assertion that label reading was necessary, and their assertion that label reading was too time consuming and cumbersome for staff to implement. They saw label reading interferring with the school's 'smooth functioning' (or something to that effect). So we requested label reading and the school asserted that it was not practical/implementable. "No food" was their solution because it was clear, consistent (a.k.a. universal), and implementable. We expressed concerns that there would be 'backlash' or resentment with this change, and in response the school spun the situation in their presentation (e.g. rationale was to keep the room clean, that lunch time was at a time that kids did not need a snack, etc).
No credibility issues here. Nope.
[/B][/quote]
so how did that work out with the "study group"? I'm trying to remember. It just seems like if the rule is [i]too "universal"[/i], they might be able to flip the tables on you sometimes. You know, circumnavigate.
Didn't [i]your own 504C try to do that?[/i]
But, yes. Might they try to change their criteria. Rationalize? Again, isn't that what your 504C attempted to do?
I take it "food free" isn't written into your 504? That it is a "school policy"? Or is it [i]specific to your 504[/i]? Would the "food free" classroom necessarily exist without [i]your[/i] 504? If it is [/i]specific to your 504[/i], then regardless of how "universal" the [i]rational[/i] is, it isn't very "universal". It's [i]specific[/i]. Specific to [i]your child[/i].

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 10:59pm
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] so how did that work out with the "study group"? I'm trying to remember. It just seems like if the rule is [i]too "universal"[/i], they might be able to flip the tables on you sometimes. You know, circumnavigate.
Didn't [i]your own 504C try to do that?[/i] [/b]
The "no food in the classroom" was in elementary school (2nd, 3rd and 4th grades) under an IHP. In fifth grade it was changed to "fruit and veggies only". We didn't have any problems related to classroom snacks those years.
Re: the "study groups" in 6th grade at the Middle School. . . .Mariah had received the 504 designation at the end of 5th grade. Our 504 plan for 6th grade stated foods served in the classroom were "pre-approved", and yes you are correct that the 504 C attempted to renig that accommodation. . . when she agreed to the accommodation she was unaware of the existence of the lunch-time study groups held in the classroom. I'm sure you recall that we considered holding the school to the original accommodation, but pursued cleaning procedures instead. [url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002096.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002096.html[/url]
Does that answer your question?
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 27, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 11:07pm
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[b]Sure, "food free" might work, but there is that credibility issue. I guess people might wonder why the rest of the school suddenly becomes safe. Sure, you can start to explain why you feel it's a more limited risk (might not be), but we begin to ramble. Tell people they aren't entitled to an explanation (504's IEP's etc,) and not only do you lose credibility, you look like an overlord. Both losing situatios, IMHO. No advice, IMMV.[/b]
MB (and anyone else who wants to chime in): Couldn't you make the argument that once food containing a child's allergens is allowed in the classroom, the potential for contamination of the classroom is really high? I'm thinking of the glitter presentation someone used where glitter got all over the classroom really quickly.
If all food is eaten somewhere else and hands are washed, the contamination risk is much lower in the classroom right? And that is where children spend the majority of their day correct? That is also where children are touching the most objects right? Kids could walk down a hallway and not touch a thing...
Looking for all opinions here! Thanks. Meg
[This message has been edited by mommyofmatt (edited March 27, 2007).]

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 11:35pm
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I started a new thread with food-free classrooms as the topic.
[url="http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002872.html"]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/Forum7/HTML/002872.html[/url]

Posted on: Mon, 03/26/2007 - 11:45pm
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hi - i have not read every post in this discussion - however i do see all sides of the picture.
in my sons classroom there are 2 children with food allergies - both are allergic to peanuts - however the other allergies vary greatly - my son has soy, corn, and many fruits the other boy has milk, egg and others.
so - we created a common "safe" snack list for the class that did not contain peanuts or nuts -- all kids in the class bring in one or 2 boxes of snacks at the beginning of the year from this list - i can check them or the teacher - if they are on the list great - if not they go to another kdg class.
however our 2 boys do not eat it - EVER - they each pack a snack that meets their specific needs. this is for parties etc. too
so far this has worked - our boys also keep a treat box in case an unplanned snack happens.
i am amazed at how well this has worked - it may not be for everyone - but both of us moms feel good about and the teacher feels good too.

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 1:18am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b]I agree with the NEVER, EVER FEED MY CHILD!! That is my rule too. he will ALWAYS have his own food, I don't care if there is a safe list or not, he will only eat what I put in his backpack that morning. [/b]
I agreed, too, when my daughter was in elementary. But now, at 13, we have made another arrangement that works for us.
Quote:Originally posted by MB:
[b]Let me be very clear. My child has never eaten anything at school that was deemed "safe" by a staff member reading a label. That's toying with my child's life. [/b]
I'm fortunate that I'm not the only person who is competent in reading an ingredient label. Our school R.N and the Director of Food Services are both qualified and competent . . . and our 504 plan utilizes them.
ETA: I'm fantasizing about a certification program avilable to school lunch programs re Food Allergies. Certificate of completion hanging on the Food Director's office wall. Would you be interested in developing and marketing that, MB? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 27, 2007).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 3:43am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b] I'm fortunate that I'm not the only person who is competent in reading an ingredient label. Our school R.N and the Director of Food Services are both qualified and competent . . . and our 504 plan utilizes them. [/b]
I'm not saying their not. [i]I've[/i] never assessed them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img] But what "qualifies" them and makes them "competent? (Seeing you're asking me to develop a certification tool....) How do you monitor their competency?
Actually, I can see the Food Services Director actually being more competent than the nurse in label reading...I think that their [b]combined[/b] efforts potentiate each other. They both have something to learn from each other. Unfortunately, my school district does not employ a "Food Services Director". I may be a nurse, but it's my ability as a parent of a food allergic child, more so than my ability as a nurse that qualifies me. Each potentiates the other.
Our hospital employs nurses, but they also employ nutritionists as well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I don't claim to know how to do her job.
Anywhooo, even tho I'm a nurse, I specialize in certain fields. I've been in those fields so long, that I almost have some [i]tunnel vision[/i] myself. If my employer bumped me to the "pediatric unit" (not intensive care pediatrics, just general pediatrics), I would [i]refuse[/i]. I'd lose my job over it. I'd quit first.
[i]I'm [b]no longer[/b] qualified in general pediatrics. [/i] When I graduated, sure, I would have taken the job, but now? It's been so long. Things change. I wouldn't know where to begin, even tho [i]I'm a mother of three[/i]. Ages 11, 7, 11 months.
As a matter of fact, my employer feels the same way. They are in the process of [i]certifying[/i] us all in PALS. Mind you, it's an emergency certification only. I *still* wouldn't feel competent enough to take charge of a pediatric patient. The only peds patients we get are larger, more "adult" like youths who have been in traumas. They are quickly transfered/flown out.
Quote:[b]ETA: I'm fantasizing about a certification program avilable to school lunch programs re Food Allergies. Certificate of completion hanging on the Food Director's office wall. Would you be interested in developing and marketing that, MB? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]
What's the hourly rate/salary? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] Gail, I punch a clock. I'm [i]lucky[/i] in that I'm employed outside the home. In addition to my "home" responsibilities. It's part of why you are able to say we have similiar lifestyles. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I don't have the [i]luxury[/i] of doing those things for free.....
So. Are you offering me a paid position? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
But yes, I too, have "trusted" people [b]I[/b] [i]deemed competent[/i] before. Remember my son's week long hospitalization this last September? (Mastoiditis thread)

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 5:35am
Gail W's picture
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Quote:I'm not saying their not. I've never assessed them. But what "qualifies" them and makes them "competent"?
Their demonstrated ability to preform this task. . . and their demonstrated understanding of the critical importance of the task. In short, they 'get it' and are extremely cautious.
Quote:How do you monitor their competency?
This is an interesting question because I do it passively. And it's not written into the 504. I do it by responding to their request, [i]insistance[/i] really, that I monitor them. They are motivated for *me* to monitor them [i]for their own protection as well as the protection of my daughter.[/i] It 'behooves' them. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I mean, it doesn't surprise you that the nurse [i]documents [/i] my prior knowledge and [i]approval[/i] of the food, doesn't it? In the one instance that I wasn't consulted/infomed (prior to the food served) and I asked for documentation from the nurse, she seemed almost [i]panicked[/i] when she realized she hadn't actually obtained my 'consent'. Poor woman. LOL.
Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
What's the hourly rate/salary? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] Gail, I punch a clock. I'm [i]lucky[/i] in that I'm employed outside the home. In addition to my "home" responsibilities. It's part of why you are able to say we have similiar lifestyles. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] I don't have the [i]luxury[/i] of doing those things for free.....
Huh? Did I use the word[i] "lifestyles"[/i]? That surprises me. If I did, it was in error because I question that. But whatever, I understand what you're saying. No, I don't punch a clock, but the [i]financial income[/i] I have brought to our household since I've 'stayed home' is certainly. . . sizable. More than I ever made punching a clock or working in my trained profession. How we spend our time/income and what we consider a 'luxury' is certainly subjective IMO.
Quote:So. Are you offering me a paid position? [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] No,* I * don't have such a position to offer. I wish I did. But I wouldn't be surprised if you or someone could find/create such a paid position for yourself. It's a possible opportunity, but I'm not sure how much it would pay. Maybe the Food Alergy Project right there near you would be interested. . . they appear to have financial resources. There'd also be potential grant money. I really think this is possible, if you were interested.
Quote:But yes, I too, have "trusted" people [b]I[/b] [i]deemed competent[/i] before. Remember my son's week long hospitalization this last September? (Mastoiditis thread)
I do. It still gives me pause even now. Thank you for bringing it up as a reminder. . .
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 27, 2007).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 10:20am
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]No, I don't punch a clock, but the financial income I have brought to our household since I've 'stayed home' is certainly. . . sizable. More than I ever made punching a clock or working in my trained profession. [/b]
Your assuming I haven't done the same...and...punched a clock as well. I remember the first house we had. I rehabbed it with my hubby. It precipitated by first "back event". I slept on the floor with my legs elevated on the couch for a good month after we did the floors...
2 months of physical therapy, and the sciatica in my leg (actually only thigh back when) was present even then. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
Honestly? Any money we made on that project, I'd gladly return for the option of not having sacrificed that portion of my back. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img] We did it entirely ourselves (had to), not a contractor involved. Came home the day after our wedding, moved in, and went to work.
Hubby and myself have considered and planned the last two residential moves. (after the rehab) I've always just considered it part of my spousal contribution to the homefront, (the investment of time and energy--I mean, doesn't *every* spouse do that? Shouldn't every spouse do that?) and not something extra-ordinary. We've made a TON. Well into the six figures. (It's a TON to me).
And we haven't had to rehab a thing. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]. We try not to invite ourselves into using the equity. I don't consider it money we need to live off of. Or use as "disposable" income. More like: "if we REALLY REALLY HAVE TO". It's incredibly difficult to spend anyway. It's not like it arrives in our debit account "direct deposit, the way paychecks do. [b]I[/b] wouldn't set it up that way either. [b]I[/b] personally wouldn't have the guts to depend on it either. It's why I remain "gainfully employed".

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 11:53am
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Quote:Originally posted by chanda4:
[b] but can I ask what all of you would do if the school didn't side with you...in this situation?? What should I do?????????????
[/b]
Have you written to your Superintendent and/or Board of Education? Have you provided them with model policies for FA?

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 12:29pm
Gail W's picture
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Quote: by Gail W:
ETA: I'm fantasizing about a certification program avilable to school lunch programs re Food Allergies. Certificate of completion hanging on the Food Director's office wall. Would you be interested in developing and marketing that, MB?
Quote:by MB:
What's the hourly rate/salary? Gail, I punch a clock. I'm lucky in that I'm employed outside the home. In addition to my "home" responsibilities. It's part of why you are able to say we have similiar lifestyles. I don't have the luxury of doing those things for free.....
See. There you go making assumptions. I never thought/suggested it would be "for free".
Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
Your assuming I haven't done the same...
Really? Have you had an LLC? If not, then it's hardly "the same". Who made the assumption here? Was it me? or you?
But whatever. I'm glad you've made a TON. Truly. And I hope you make tons and tons more in whatever you choose to do.
MB, I don't like that you seem intent on discussing personal income(s) with *me*.
[This message has been edited by Gail W (edited March 27, 2007).]

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 8:51pm
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hmmmmm. I thought the topic of this thread was signing up for Kindergarten, reading food labels, and food free classrooms. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
New question: I've found out that other schools in my town appear to be more accommodating. I would have to make an out of district request to move to another public school. According to the rumor mill, these requests aren't granted too frequently.
Experience anyone?

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 10:59pm
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Quote:Originally posted by mommyofmatt:
[b]hmmmmm. I thought the topic of this thread was signing up for Kindergarten, reading food labels, and food free classrooms. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
New question: I've found out that other schools in my town appear to be more accommodating. I would have to make an out of district request to move to another public school. According to the rumor mill, these requests aren't granted too frequently.
Experience anyone?[/b]
mommyofmatt....we moved last August into a new home. I actually checked all of the elementary school within the District (4 of them). I decided to send my children to a school that is within the District, but outside the busing area. I did not have to do anything special because my children would be in the same District...it is not considered "open enrollement". This could be different from state to state. I just wanted to let you know that we didn't need anything "granted" because the school was still w/in District. Does that make sense? (still early and I think I need more coffee!)

Posted on: Tue, 03/27/2007 - 11:57pm
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b]
mommyofmatt....we moved last August into a new home. I actually checked all of the elementary school within the District (4 of them). I decided to send my children to a school that is within the District, but outside the busing area. I did not have to do anything special because my children would be in the same District...it is not considered "open enrollement". This could be different from state to state. I just wanted to let you know that we didn't need anything "granted" because the school was still w/in District. Does that make sense? (still early and I think I need more coffee!)[/b]
no it does not. I get the feeling it "suited" the needs of the district so it was allowed. (Might be wrong, out here, such [i]changes in placement[/i] require extensive documentation of [i]need[/i]. There is also reallocation of funds to accompany it. It must all be documented, if indeed, you get the accomodation (note, not [i]preference[/i], as it must be a genuine need, at all.

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:01am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]
MB, I don't like that you seem intent on discussing personal income(s) with *me*.
[/b]
I'm equally disturbed by your ever so sly suggestions at how I might reallocate my energy, or time, or both, under the guise of being flattering.
It's happened several times, so I decided to address it. Glad I did.

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:03am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by mommyofmatt:
[b]hmmmmm. I thought the topic of this thread was signing up for Kindergarten, reading food labels, and food free classrooms. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/tongue.gif[/img]
New question: I've found out that other schools in my town appear to be more accommodating. I would have to make an out of district request to move to another public school. According to the rumor mill, these requests aren't granted too frequently.
Experience anyone?[/b]
Going to transfer this to PeanutMilitia's new thread about 504's and IEP's.

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:14am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by Gail W:
[b]This is an interesting question because I do it passively. And it's not written into the 504. I do it by responding to their request, insistance really, that I monitor them. They are motivated for *me* to monitor them for their own protection as well as the protection of my daughter. It 'behooves' them. I mean, it doesn't surprise you that the nurse documents my prior knowledge and approval of the food, doesn't it? In the one instance that I wasn't consulted/infomed (prior to the food served) and I asked for documentation from the nurse, she seemed almost panicked when she realized she hadn't actually obtained my 'consent'. Poor woman. LOL.
[/b]
why was she panicked? You said she "qualified"? Are is she asking for your "informed consent" [i]and receiving documentation of it[/i]? (probably shouldn't italicize that, since it's probably obvious, but I could be wrong in interpreting that as "documentation")
Do you make the final call? Are you [i]necessary[/i] to make the final decision?

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:33am
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Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] no it does not. I get the feeling it "suited" the needs of the district so it was allowed. (Might be wrong, out here, such [i]changes in placement[/i] require extensive documentation of [i]need[/i]. There is also reallocation of funds to accompany it. It must all be documented, if indeed, you get the accomodation (note, not [i]preference[/i], as it must be a genuine need, at all.
[/b]
Sorry MB..you are wrong on this one. The school had NOTHING to do with my decision as to where to send my children. I visited the schools BEFORE they knew anything about my children's allergies or LDs. I decided which school I wanted and then filled out the paperwork and started the IEP transfer. Like I said, it is probably different depending upon where you live. This is just my personal experience.
The District receives my childrens' funds regardless of which school within the District they attend.
Mommyofmatt...check it out and see if your state is the same when it comes to school choice.

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:42am
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
[b] Sorry MB..you are wrong on this one. The school had NOTHING to do with my decision as to where to send my children. I visited the schools BEFORE they knew anything about my children's allergies or LDs. I decided which school I wanted and then filled out the paperwork and started the IEP transfer. Like I said, it is probably different depending upon where you live. This is just my personal experience. [/b]
Nope, I'm not wrong. This is what I assumed. You asked and received. I don't think they just decided to send your child to another school.... I assumed you had to request the school out of your address.
Quote:[b]The District receives my childrens' funds regardless of which school within the District they attend. [/b]
So does mine. Except they allocate *my* students funds to the school he attends for their particular budget. Each school in your district has a budget, yes? Takes attendance?
Quote:[b]Mommyofmatt...check it out and see if your state is the same when it comes to school choice.[/b]
That's what I was wondering in my original post. My state (haven't checked it out) doesn't appear, considering the difficulty I've had, to be one that redistricts for the individual lightly....
Currently my youngest child is following in his brother's footsteps. He is attending another school in district in order to receive "accommodations". One year, my oldest was placed [i]out of district[/i] partly in order to obtain a "full time nurse". Partly for learning needs. The learning needs might have been met "in district", but the need for a "full time nurse" tipped the scales.
The [b]next[/b] year, suddenly, after I had mentioned "least restrictive environment", a full time school nurse showed up in a district school (actually closer to our house, but still not the one associated with my address), and voila, they moved him *back* "in district". I probably should have pressed for "least restrictive environment" sooner, but I was personally glad to be "out of district" while some changes were taking place. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
No advice, just my own personal happenstance.

Posted on: Wed, 03/28/2007 - 12:46am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by notnutty:
I decided which school I wanted and then filled out the paperwork and started the [b]*********<<<<<<<<>>>>>>>********* transfer.
I had to embellish those three little letters. If you hadn't had an IEP, would the tranfer had proceeded as smoothly? If you had had a 504? No formal plan at all?
Is your child's IEP for LD, the allergy, or both?
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited March 28, 2007).]

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