Flying Internationally with a PA son

Posted on: Sat, 03/16/2013 - 3:26pm
andy8922's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/16/2013 - 22:10

We are planning on going to visit family in South Africa in the fall. I am worried about the plane ride for my 3 yr old son who has a peanut and tree nut allergy. We would be flying from Cleveland, OH to Washington DC, then from DC to Johannesburg on South African Airways with a stop over in Dakar in Senegal ( we don't have to get off the plane at this stop). I am terrified to travel with him for so long and with the possibilities of delays with all the stops. What if he has a reaction on the plane? What if I run out of food for him? I'm thinking about not bringing him with. Has anyone had any experiences like this? What would you recommend?
Thank You

Posted on: Tue, 03/19/2013 - 11:45am
CanEatOreos's picture
Offline
Joined: 07/20/2012 - 08:11

The very first flight we took after my son's P/TN allergy diagnosis, I insisted my husband clean the seat. Right away, he found a peanut. I still love that peanut. It was the first time I felt like I had any control. And now my husband now will put up with all my preventive measures. Plan for the worst but don't forget to enjoy the journey.

Posted on: Thu, 03/21/2013 - 1:47am
CHNAMA's picture
Offline
Joined: 06/04/2012 - 17:21

First of all contact the airline and talk to them about their peanut policy. Do they carry peanuts on board? Will they change that for the flight you are on? Will they make announcements to the rows in front and in back of you and ask people not to eat any peanut products they have brought on board? Can you have early boarding so you can inspect and clean the area before your son gets on board. We flew to China in December on Delta Airlines and the flight crew was fantastic. I know the feeling. I left my older daughter behind when I went to adopt her younger sister in China because I was so afraid of what might happen. Since then she has been on more airplane trips than I can remember and she has been on two trips to China and has done very well on both the flights and the travel. I don't know about languages in South Africa, when we travel in China, we have cards we carry that tell she has a severe peanut allergy written in Chinese. Before each meal we give it to the servers at the restaurant. I hope this helps a little.

Posted on: Thu, 03/21/2013 - 2:12am
mamameetcha's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/21/2013 - 08:47

My son has severe peanut and treenut allergies (both touch sensitive). The farthest I've taken him so far is Boston-California a few times. My advice to you is to be "that crazy mom". The squeaky wheel gets the oil.
1. Call the airline ahead of time and have them make a note to alert the crew of a "very severe" nut allergy. Ask if they can clear your flight of nuts. 2.Arrive at least 30 minutes before your flight and pull the flight attendants aside. Explain that your child has multiple nut allergies, not just peanut. You will need at least two rows in front and behind you cleared of nuts. 3. Pre-board the flight to wipe down your seats and the surrounding seats/floor. 4. When the surrounding rows board, lean over and ask everyone to refrain from eating nuts. Explain that your child is hyper sensitive (even if he is not). They will feel awkward and understand. 5. Obviously bring benadryl/epi-pens and try to fly early in the morning after the plane has been cleaned.
The advice above about bringing a card with a translated nut warning is brilliant. I'll keep that one in my back pocket for sure. Good luck and have a blast! Everything will be OK if you are proactive :)

Posted on: Thu, 03/21/2013 - 10:44am
kelly mc's picture
Offline
Joined: 03/21/2013 - 17:36

My son also has severe peanut allergy and reacts when he touches peanut residue. I agree with the above comments. Call the airline, ask to preboard and wipe everything! I pack baggies of wipes. One set of baggies has clorox wipes which I use on the seat, arm rest, seat belt, tray table and back of the seat that the tray table touches. The other set has hand wipes, which he uses before he eats anything on the plane. Bring a second set for the flight home:) After he had a reaction on a plane, we took an additional step. We now bring a bed sheet which we drape over his entire seat. It moves around and is a pain, but everything is covered then! The sheet folds up flat so it fits in his carry on back pack. Good luck and safe travels:)

Peanut Free and Nut Free Community

Click on one of the categories below to see all topics and discussions.

Latest Discussions

Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 11:03am
Comments: 10
Latest Post by Italia38 Wed, 01/15/2020 - 10:52am
Comments: 2
Latest Post by penelope Tue, 01/14/2020 - 1:03pm
Comments: 1
Latest Post by penelope Sun, 12/29/2019 - 6:21pm
Comments: 2
Latest Post by sunshinestate Sun, 12/29/2019 - 6:00pm
Comments: 3
Latest Post by Italia38 Sun, 12/29/2019 - 5:44pm
Comments: 5
Latest Post by justme Tue, 12/17/2019 - 3:41pm
Comments: 4
Latest Post by justme Tue, 12/17/2019 - 2:39pm
Comments: 45

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

If you have a food allergy, you will probably need to make some changes to your diet...

When love is in the air we can get caught up in the moment and throw caution to the wind. However, if you have a...

Do you have a child with peanut allergies and an upcoming birthday? Perhaps you'd like to bake a...

Many doctors treat allergies, including pediatricians and general practice doctors. When allergies are severe, primary care physicians often refer...

If you are looking for a way to support food allergy education and awareness, you may be interested in a documentary created by a young filmmaker...

The most frightening thing about a severe allergic reaction to a new food is that it can happen so fast. If parents are not looking for allergic...

Skin rashes and itching are common allergic reactions to peanut butter. According to the Mayo Clinic, reactions to peanut butter can happen within...

A low oxalate diet may be recommended to prevent kidney stones from forming. Oxalates are chemicals found in plant-based foods. These may collect...

So many wonderful recipes call for peanut butter. These recipes can still be enjoyed by experimenting with peanut butter replacements.

...

According to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, one out of five people in the U.S. has an allergy. Because there is a...

Hydrogenated vegetable oil sounds healthy because of the word "vegetable" in it. The truth is that it is not very healthy at all because it...

Foods with soy lecithin may need to be avoided if you have a soy allergy. Soy lecithin is present in many different foods. Since it is derived...

At some point in time, most people will suffer from food intolerance or a food allergy. Having an unpleasant reaction to something you have eaten...

The Jaffe Allergy Technique or Jaffe Mellor Technique (JMT) is an alternative approach to addressing symptoms of a variety of health issues, both...

Phenols found in healthy fruits, vegetables and grains could point to food allergies...

Allergies and anxiety are often experienced together, yet there is no scientific evidence that either condition causes the other. The enduring tie...

Tree nuts and peanuts are distinctly different. An allergy to one does not guarantee an allergy to the other. Peanuts are considered legumes and...

What can you eat if you can't eat peanut butter? Fortunately for people with a peanut allergy, there...

A few years ago, a 47-year-old Toronto woman received a lifesaving double-lung transplant. After the transplant, she suffered four anaphylactic...

Whether it's the holiday season, birthdays, or a dinner party, there's always a need for good gift ideas but it gets a bit more challenging when...