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Posted on: Thu, 08/19/1999 - 11:43am
dhumphries's picture
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Joined: 02/02/1999 - 09:00

Janet,
I'm really glad that your campaigning got through. Good luck to your child and you.

Posted on: Fri, 08/20/1999 - 6:24am
podczasyj's picture
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Joined: 08/09/1999 - 09:00

Hello from PA,
My 5-year-old son is starting Kindergarten in September and we have come up against some trouble with the bus and his epi-pen needs. The school has been most cooperative up to this point. Carrying the epi-pen with him at all times and training personnel is not an issue since his allergist sent the school a letter outlining the procedures he needs to have followed...the problem is the bus. The bus company refuses to have their driver admister the epi-pen if it was needed. We are at the end of the run, so I had checked with our previous allergist and current allergist and they concurred that if he was last on, first off within a 10 minute window (the school is a slow 7 minute drive), he should enjoy the company of his peers. The school would like to put him on a federally funded (severly handicapped)bus. Under the terms of the 504 does not my son have the right to a modified program?

Posted on: Mon, 08/23/1999 - 5:09am
PattyR's picture
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Joined: 04/12/2002 - 09:00

I am having the same problem with the school bus. Everyone but me seems to think it is OK for him to be away from the EpiPen for 30 minutes 2x a day. I even called FAN and they told me that most kids don't have the Epipen on the bus and that I should request a strict no food policy and have my son sit near the bus driver with no Epipen. I don't know of any easy solution. The school district requires that it be locked up. There is not consistent bus driver or bus at this point. My children have been in school for a month already as they are on a year round schedule.
The school suggested that I drive him (at my own expense). It is 10 miles one way so it would be a total of 40 miles per day. Any words or reassurance?

Posted on: Tue, 08/24/1999 - 12:33am
PattyR's picture
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Joined: 04/12/2002 - 09:00

Sometimes all you have to do is ask! It looks like they are going to change the EpiPen policy for the whole county. The transportation dept. is willing the train the bus drivers! Now we have to figure out the logistics. My husband is going to experiment with keeping the epipen at the appropriate temperature in a cooler bag that will remain in the bus. He is a computer guy and has written a program that measures temperature at regular intervals. I'll let you know how it goes!

Posted on: Tue, 08/24/1999 - 10:51am
Janet Laflamme's picture
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Joined: 02/08/1999 - 09:00

It sounds like there are many people in the same place we were last year for kindergarten. Persistence does pay off. I basically wrote to everyone and anyone and the nursing supervisor and superintendent finally saw after a year that I was not going to go away. I did drive my son to school for the entire year. I or a family member went to monitor every lunch period, party, and field trip for the entire year. Yes, this was a hardship on the family as my husband works rotating 12 hr. shifts and I work part-time as a chemist. We also had an 18 month old son as well. It was a very rough year but the school personnel could see that we weren't asking them to do anything we don't already do ourselves.
I was also very disappointed with FAN since I called and asked them for a letter of support on the issue of always having access to an epi-pen. They gave me the same drivel about the school doing their best with a no eating policy etc. THIS IS ABSURD! There is no way I'm risking my son's life based on other people following the rules. We all know how often they are broken and my son shouldn't pay for a mistake (eating a forbidden treat or candy) with his life. He is only 6 and sooner or later he will make a wrong judgement. I just want him to have the chance to take his medication.
Keep writing letters and making phone calls. Show them with your actions how seriously your family treats this allergy. Don't give in there are some things about this allergy which can't be negotiated. Access to medications is one of them. I keep thinking of all the other kids who either don't have their meds with them or are carrying them 'illegally' (without permission) and might be afraid to take them out and use them. These are the situations which make it difficult for the rest of us to get proper plans in place.

Posted on: Sun, 08/29/1999 - 3:07am
podczasyj's picture
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Joined: 08/09/1999 - 09:00

Hurrah! Hurrah!
This is an update on my kindergarden-age son's transportation issue. For all of you who said that being firm and persistant...thank you. Our school district has come up with a solution for this year. There will be district-aides riding on his bus who will administer the epi-pen if needed. We live in PA. I would love to see something changed nationally about these transportation issues. I don't think that our children should be forced to compromise their safety in order to ride these buses. This solution was offered by the elementary school's pricipal and not by the bus company. The bus company's representative has informed us that our son's safety is not at risk and therefore not a consideration of the bus company. They also has stated that they would offer no assistance. I would like to follow up on this. It shouldn't be so difficult for all of us.
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Posted on: Tue, 08/31/1999 - 12:24am
Abitha's picture
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Joined: 07/06/1999 - 09:00

My five year old son started a.m. kindergarten yesterday. This week I am driving him to school and also picking him up. Next week, he and his older brother will be riding a mini bus to school. They will be the last stop before the bus drops the kids off at school. The bus driver will be trained on how to use the epi-pen. The door handles and seat will be cleaned with wet wipes before my boys get on the bus. My older son is also PA, but not as seriously as my five year old. He is very protective of his little brother and has no problem keeping an eye on him. I feel fortunate to live in a school district where my son's safety is taken very seriously.

Posted on: Tue, 08/31/1999 - 4:15pm
EILEEN's picture
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Joined: 04/06/1999 - 09:00

Ditto the disappointment with FAN. I have spent too much money on materials telling me to smile and be happy about peanut allery yet when I asked for some imput to help with a real problem I just get a brush-off. We wouldn't be driving ourselves so crazy if FAN helped to get peanuts/peanut butter banned in schools. But no, that might upset the parents of children who love peanuts who seem to matter more than than the parents of children who can did from peanuts.
[This message has been edited by EILEEN (edited September 01, 1999).]
[This message has been edited by EILEEN (edited September 01, 1999).]

Posted on: Fri, 09/03/1999 - 5:40am
denyse's picture
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Joined: 09/03/1999 - 09:00

denyse
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Posted on: Fri, 09/03/1999 - 6:11am
denyse's picture
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Joined: 09/03/1999 - 09:00

denyse I'm a school nurse in NJ, and I'm so glad to have found this forum. In NJ, a law was recently passed that mandates that all public schools must train at least one other person besides the S.N. to administer Epi-pen to a student who has one ordered. In addition, they must be C.P.R. certified. However, I have a problem that will seem quite ridiculous, but none the less is a stumbling block in tis child's IHP. NJ state law prohibits the administration of ANY OTHER medication by anyone except the nurse, parent. or the student who has the approval of his physician to do so. The problem is the child's health plan calls for the administration of Benadryl at first sign of reaction followed by epi if needed. I'm at this school full time, but as we all know I can't guarantee that I won't be out of the building (meeting lunch etc.) if this child has a reaction. Because this child is only 5, the M.D. won't allow self administration, even if the benadryl is pre-drawn, kept in the classroom and the child is supervised by the teacher. This is the only way we can circumvent this state law...and of course we know that the teacher would make sure the med was taken even if she had to actually give it herself.
After two days of dealing with this, I feel I'm losing objectivity. Will someone tell me, are we wrong? Is the doctor wrong? The district is willing to bend this short of the law, but no more. The only other solution I can see is to hire a health aid for this child, but I can't see that happening .

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