Trace Amounts of Peanut causing Life threating reactions?

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 3:16am
crazydaisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2003 - 09:00

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]

[This message has been edited by crazydaisy (edited October 14, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 4:00am
MimiM's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

Just want to mention that avoiding "trace amounts" isn't only because it could directly cause an anaphylactic reaction.
It is also because eating foods that have "trace" amounts can potentially cause a person to become more sensitive over time increasing the risk of a life threatening reaction.

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 4:26am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MimiM:
[b]Just want to mention that avoiding "trace amounts" isn't only because it could directly cause an anaphylactic reaction.
It is also because eating foods that have "trace" amounts can potentially cause a person to become more sensitive over time increasing the risk of a life threatening reaction.[/b]
I dont mean to disagree... but I am [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I am sure there are links, by the NY docs, that state this (and if there are, please post them), but in my mind, and Im sure not just in OUR case, I dont buy the 'more sensitive over time' theory...
I think if you have an allergy, avoiding the food keeps you safe in the present, yet does nothing for you in the future.
I believe that the future will happen a certain way, not because of the present, but 'just because', kwim?
If we gave Caitlin wheat every day (we do, in only one instance), and shes allergic to wheat (RAST +, reacts to wheat thins, etc..) does that cause her to not outgrow a wheat allergy?
Y'know what.. Someone, PLEASE give me that link... If there is one, and you do, I can safely say I'll stop giving her wheat this instant... But if she doesnt react to it (like her other allergens), I'm gonan gkeep giving it to her...
Kind of like the 'trace amts' Q that was posed.... Her WF/DF Newman foods have the allergen statement 'May contain...'. That doesnt mean it DOES. Just that it MAY.
Are we preventing her from outgrowing the allergy, just from giving her these snacks which MAY not contain the allergens?
Show me the link. (not OP, not insinuating you in ANY matter, kwim?)
But this discussion always hits a nerve with me... Maybe because I'm on both sides of it (be safe, but give foods with may contains..).
IN ADDITION:
TODAY -- DW bought some gummy bouncy bear things that have NO allergen statement, and look safe according to ingred label..
I call the company (some Chinese Co), and they say they can't guarantee yada yada yada... I pass that on to DW... She says ok. Take them to work then. I wont feed her those...
Why not these gummis but yes to the newmans? How the heck do I know the inner workings of a woman... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Jason
Caitlin 4-17-00 Allergic to Dairy, Egg, Wheat, Bananas, Grapes, Rye, Sesame, Beef, Garlic, Mustard, Onion, Peas and Avoiding Latex and all Nuts
Sara 2-13-98 NKA (Avoiding Nuts)
Meghan 2-28-03 NKA (Avoiding Nuts)
[url="http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin"]http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin[/url]

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 4:38am
crazydaisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2003 - 09:00

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by crazydaisy (edited October 14, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 5:14am
MimiM's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

I agree that it gets confusing but really I think it comes down comfort level.
When my son was little, he was allergic to eggs. I did not call companies to find out if things were made on shared equipment but I did stick with major brands and if I suspected cross-contamination we would simply avoid that food. This was under advice of our allergist. It did pay off because by 2 1/2, he could pretty much eat a whole piece of french toast and maybe get one tiny hive after about 15 minutes. At age 3 it was completely gone.
I'm not sure how severe your daughter's wheat allergy is but it may be a totally different issue with wheat. From what I know about wheat allergy, it is usually not very severe and rarely anaphylactic. It is also in so many foods that it is very difficult to avoid. If my child had multiple food allergy with wheat being one, that might be the one that I would tend to be somewhat less strict with. However, this might mean that he might take longer to outgrow it.
However when it comes to PA, I feel it's a totally different story. Peanut is right now one of the most allergenic foods in existance. Whether there is strong data out there or not, if there's a chance that my child will become more sensitive to peanut with trace amounts, you better believe I will not take that risk. It's not necessary and not worth it. Furthermore, if my son grows up seeing me laxed about "may contains", he may not take his food allergy seriously.
By the way, responding to the gummy bear issue, I think it's fair to say that we all question why we are comfortable with one thing and not another sometimes.
Newman's is a major company however and the gummies are from china where allergen labelling does not even exist (to my knowledge.
Take care.

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 5:19am
Nutternomore's picture
Offline
Joined: 08/02/2002 - 09:00

I would point out that especially in younger children, it is a very slippery slope from contact to ingestion. Young kids often touch their eyes, mouth, nose, during the course of the school day, which is why those who initiate 504 or IHP plans often structure accommodations to minimize contact (as well as direct ingestion) of the offending allergen(s).
[This message has been edited by Nutternomore (edited October 14, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 5:29am
crazydaisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2003 - 09:00

MimiM, Thank you very much for your reply
[b]However when it comes to PA, I feel it's a totally different story. Peanut is right now one of the most allergenic foods in existance. Whether there is strong data out there or not, if there's a chance that my child will become more sensitive to peanut with trace amounts, you better believe I will not take that risk. It's not necessary and not worth it. Furthermore, if my son grows up seeing me laxed about "may contains", he may not take his food allergy seriously.[/b]
[This message has been edited by crazydaisy (edited October 14, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 10/14/2004 - 6:13am
crazydaisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2003 - 09:00

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img]
[This message has been edited by crazydaisy (edited October 14, 2004).]

Posted on: Fri, 10/15/2004 - 3:16am
MimiM's picture
Offline
Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

Your welcome Crazydaisy!
I'm curious what your messages said before you deleted them. Are you trying to get documentation for school or is someone trying to dispute you on the issue?

Posted on: Fri, 10/15/2004 - 3:43am
crazydaisy's picture
Offline
Joined: 11/14/2003 - 09:00

MimiM,Yes and thank you!
------------------
The Daisy Thanks You

Posted on: Fri, 10/15/2004 - 3:52am
jtolpin's picture
Offline
Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

Me? disputing? I don't think so.
Just stating our OWN personal stories, in hopes of helping others... And gaining information. That's all.
Sorry if I upset anyone...
Jason
------------------
[b]* ENRICHED * [/b]

Pages

Forum

Click on one of the categories below to see all forum topics.

Peanut Free Store

More Articles

Are you tired of serving fresh-cut fruits and veggies as a healthy snack? Sure, there's nothing wrong with these options, but they can get boring...

Are you craving cake? Perhaps there's an upcoming birthday...

In the United States, there are no lines of ice cream that are dedicated to being nut-free....

Molecular allergy component testing identifies the specific food or environmental proteins triggering a person’s allergic reactions. Component...

Fact 1: Over a third of food allergy reactions happen after the first known oral...