To The Over-Reactive Parents Of The \"PA\" Kids

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 7:42am
PeanutButterJellyTime's picture
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I understand that peanut allergies can be severe. However, it's irrational to think that you're going to be able to control every aspect of your child's environment. To make entire schools peanut-free is nearly impossible and seems to me to be an overreaction to this situation. I can't even imagine the isolation these kids must feel when they have to sit alone for fear of coming in contact with a peanut particle. When I think of a peanut-free school, I get this image of children rolling around in giant hamster balls so as not to breathe the same air that a non "PA" child breathes, and teachers walking around in moon suits so as not to "contaminate" anything. What are these kids going to do when they become young adults and are literally afraid to breathe on their own? Also, to cater to peanut-allergies in this intense fashion would mean that we would have to cater to every single disability in this manner. In keeping with the trend, we

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 8:00am
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Gee, I hope your child never develops a life-threatening allergy to peanuts, or anything else for that matter.
Allergies can develop at any time in a person's life.
Let's see what your opinion would be then and how you would handle it.
Have a good day.

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 8:24am
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peanutbutterjellytime ...
i think we here are all well aware of the flip-side of the peanut allergy! thanks for "creeping ME out" and reminding me of the type of selfish people i will have to deal with when my daughter reaches school age!!!!!

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 8:35am
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Can you say troll

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 8:45am
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I think that the best reply here is to ignore and not give the satisfaction of a reaction on our part as parents of chidren with food allergies. Obviously this person will not be convinced or told otherwise. All that a response will do is to feed into this persons resentment.

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 11:12am
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PeanutButterJellyTime, wow are you ever selfish! I can't believe that insensitive people like you actually exist! And like others said, how would you feel if your child were in this situation? Hopefully you don't, or your child for that matter, develop any allergy to food, we'll see what your thoughts are then? Maybe you think twice ... You can never possibly imagine the fear we go through b/c of this. Sorry that our children with food allergies are such a burden to you, maybe you should open a school for close minded people and send your child/children there.

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 11:23am
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I was actually thinking about this very subject today. Trust me when I say to everyone, I understand. I understand the desire to make my child as safe as possible in the school setting. After all, she will be spending most of her days in the future inside the walls of that building, why shouldn't she be catered to? She could die, for pity's sake. That scares me to death.
I also see the flip-side. My daughters egg allergy is very severe and scares me even more than her other allergies right now because we've actually seen her reactions to eggs. But I have yet to see someone try to make a school egg free. No Mayo, no ranch dressing, no french toast sticks, no baked goods....
I feel that as a parent it is my job to make the people who come in contact with my child on a regular basis aware and as informed as possible of her allergies and what the consequences can be. I can't change the world she lives in. It is not humanly possible. I need to teach her the tools to survive in this world.
I'm not trying to pick a fight, I'm not saying I agree with one more than the other. I guess I'm just saying that we all have opinions on what is best and who is right and wrong.
Of course, I've been thinking about all of this today because this morning I brought my 3 yo DD to three-school and walked her into her [i]peanut-free [/i]classroom, washed her hands and turned around to find the other kids doing a craft with [b]raw[/b] sugar cookie dough. An EA's nightmare. But they weren't going to eat it. [i][b]WHAT?!?!? [/b][/i]I had to explain that if my daughter would even touch a chair that another child touched, she would have a reaction. They thought FA's were only by ingestion. I know I explained it before. But I had to walk back out the door with my dd in tow. Who, handled it much better than me.
So anyway, I'm looking at it as a learning experience. I learned something, and so did her teacher. Reaction free.
So, how about those egg-free schools???
Kara

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 9:52pm
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All I have to say is this: IT IS PEOPLE LIKE YOU THAT MAKE THE WORLD UGLY!!!!! I hope one day you or someone you know has to deal with ANY LIFE THREATNING ALLERGY YES LIFE THREATNING!!!!!! GROW UP!!!!!!

Posted on: Wed, 10/17/2007 - 11:03pm
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I think the best reaction to this topic starter is just to ignore it. Obviously nothing that is said is going to change their mind and giving him/her any of our time is just want they want.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 12:18am
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Sky Mom has the right idea, [b]IGNORE.[/b]
Peg

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 1:22am
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I go....and look what happens.
I SMELL TROLL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
I hope you're child never develops FA, the poor thing to have a parent so not understanding. I dread to think of your childs safety, if she/he was ever put in that situation.
Look.
I know it can be hard being told that little jimmy can't take PB sandwiches to school anymore, but he has to have something else to eat now. Schools ban PN/TN for a reason. If he was ever PA, little jimmy would have to eat something else or risk DEATH.
Stop ranting and develop your compassion towards those with LTFA.
Bye!!!!!!

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 1:47am
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I am actually responding to the earlier poster - my son has an egg-free classroom and has had one for 5 years now. I feel it is detrimental to my child's ability to learn to need to be constantly vigilant regarding his allergy in addition to paying attention to the teacher - particularly at a younger age. In grade 8, however, my daughter still has a peanut free classroom for the same reason - she eats her lunch, though, in the regular cafeteria where there are no accomodations for her allergy since she is now old enough to manage that environment safely.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 2:17am
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It's rather disturbing to think that someone would take the time to find this message board, register and post here just to say something like this. I think this post is less about this person's true feeling about PA and more of a symptom of some psychological disorder that causes people to become internet trolls. IRL no one probably cares about this person's opinion so they turn to the internet to rile people up.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 3:04am
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We have read the post and it is something we do sometimes hear from non-peanut allergic parents, so I hope we get some good educational replies (and links to older threads with rebuttals) to help others deal when they hear these types of comments.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 3:18am
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That is really incredible to me, the fact that simply asking a child to refrain from eating peanut butter etc. during school attended times is such an inconvenience is unthinkable. Its not such a small amount of children affected , its one of the most severe food allergies, its a lack of education on this parents part.
I am very lucky to have a wonderful school community that believes all children deserve a safe environment at school ,obviously school would be a ticking time bomb if everyother kids had a PB&J , its pretty obvious.
Your kid can eat their icing sugar ladden peanut butter at home where it won't risk an innocent child's life.
Clearly clueless, and heartless.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 4:32am
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I have to admit that I can not believe that someone would even post a comment like this especially on this website how very SELFISH!!! Anyone who has children knows that you want to protect them in any way you can, sorry if it is an inconvenience to some!!!!!!

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 5:50am
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I think that you might not truly understand that peanut allergies can be so severe that they are life-threatening within minutes sometimes and I hope you are grateful for not having to live hoping never to have to cope with a sudden loss of your child's or brother's life. I am not so fortunate.
I agree that it's irrational to think that you're going to be able to control every aspect of your child's environment and my only expectation is that the school and I manage risk as best we can. To make entire schools peanut-free is absolutely impossible and no parent of a food allergic child would truly believe that all times any school is peanut free.
Isolation for brief periods such as lunch times is preferred to fear of loss of life and many children feel comforted not isolated when they are removed from harms way. That said few of us allow our children to eat alone: my son eats with a couple of friends in a school meeting room near the office and 35 years ago when my brother was in high school, he ate with friends in a classroom. Safety not isolation is the goal.
Your description of a peanut free school with hamster balls and moon suits is imaginative and made me chuckle at the picture. Thanks for the laugh

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 6:15am
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Thank you, Kathryn, for your thoughtful reply. Well said.
Kara

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 8:52am
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Kathryn,
That was said so beautifully. Thank you for your response on behalf of all of us.
LJ

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 11:16am
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And all I wanted to know is if any of you "knowledgeable" posters ever heard if Boullion or Worchester Sauce have ever been connected to a PA. And all you do is comment on some nonsense that all they are trying to do is get a rise out of you...

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 11:51am
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Yes, I have heard of that in the past. I know that one of my Boullion is "manufactured in a plant". I think that is Wylers brand. I have checked on Meijer brand and it is safe. I use it all the time. I can't use Worchestershire sauce because of the anchovies. I had never seen a peanut warning on mine and used up until Dd was also diagnosed Shellfish allergic. We also avoid all fish now, so no more of that for us.
And you are right. We should save our breath for the real reason we are here. To help each other out.
I'm not sure if I helped you or not, but that's what I know.
Kara

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 11:59am
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Thanks Kara, I still am trying to find out why my son has problems with hamburgers and steak. He has a PA, not a meat allergy. But my point really was, everyone is focusing on the person trying to make trouble. Sad how that happens. I know you understand.

Posted on: Thu, 10/18/2007 - 9:17pm
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Kathryn,
Well said.
But why is your child eating seperately, we have sabrina's law in place, and the schools as much as the world can not be peanut free, but schools should be as much as they can with encouragement and teachings.Sabrina's Law tell the schools must lessen the chance of exposure to the child's allergen.That should mean no parent sends anything containing nuts or peanuts.I am sorry to hear we are in the same province and sounds like your school policy might be very out of date.

Posted on: Fri, 10/19/2007 - 12:15am
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Four words:
No allergy, no opinion.

Posted on: Fri, 10/19/2007 - 4:22am
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RE: But why is your child eating separately...
I worked very hard along with others to have Sabrina's Law passed and I am a longtime layperson allergy educator providing presentations and guidance to schools and other organizations that want to be proactive about allergy safety for consumers and leading a support group for those dealing with life-threatening allergy.
My son and I made a personal choice early in his school years to have him eat separately with other children with food allergies to various allergens and with at least one friend of his choosing whose parents I have educated about lunch choices. My son has multiple food allergies and we think that this is a safe alternative and one that balances his needs with the needs of the school and other students.
Sabrina

Posted on: Sat, 10/20/2007 - 12:54am
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No, I do not think you understand anything about Food Allergies. I also do not think you could possibly be a parent. If you are, I feel very sorry for your children because they too will learn to be ignorant, like you.
I just find it a little odd that you actually took the time to find this website, sign up for it, and then rant like you did. Grow up. Get a hobby. Better yet, get educated.
Here is how I see it: If my son (who has a severe PN/TN allergy) were in a wheelchair, for instance, would I be "overreacting" if I requested the school build a ramp so he can go to school safely like all of the other 8 years old in town? No? Why? Because you can SEE his disability? Right! Now, if I were to go even further, I would say that he most likely would not die from being in a wheelchair, but he COULD die from exposure to nuts. So please, tell me HOW I am overreacting. Thanks!

Posted on: Sat, 10/20/2007 - 11:56pm
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It sounds like some of you think Sabrina's Law in Ontario says that kids have to be fully integrated for lunch etc. It does not say that. It says this which emphasizes individual plans:
Sabrina

Posted on: Sun, 10/21/2007 - 9:14am
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My personal opinion is that the school community should try not to send in to the school nut/peanut products so to lessen the chance of an exposure due to trace amounts being throughout the school , thus allowing all children to eat together , because therefore segregation wouldn't be needed, Personally , I did not like the tought of my child eating in another room, I felt much better knowing that my school took the stance of including all students parents in eliminating my childs allergen, thus lowering her chance of exposure, I can not provide this anywhere else we go , the park stores, resturants , amusement parks anywhere, at least I know my child is in a school that is looking out for her along side of me , and not me inspite of them.
I did not mean to cause a situation, just voicing my opinion.

Posted on: Mon, 10/22/2007 - 8:03am
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You all may not agree with me but here's my opinion. First of all, I don't really think of PBJ time as a troll. After all, this person obviously is interested in what we have to say otherwise he or she would not have taken the time to write a lengthy post expressing his or her opinion. If one posts an opinion it is generally because one wants to hear what others have to say about it. I have to agree that the tone in which it was written could have been better and maybe that is why this person has been given so much criticism. However, here is the perfect opportunity for us to educate someone who is from the other side of the fence (if you will)...so rather than fight, I think it's important to explain to PBJ time what it's like to be in our shoes. Give examples of reactions, educate on the natural course of peanut allergy and how it affects your child and your family life. Don't encourage PBJ time to leave but rather make them want to stay and read more. The longer this person hangs around, the more likely they might learn something from us and possibly see the light. Then, they may even share with others.
In regards to making schools "peanut free", I personally feel that the need for this is age specific. For example, in the day care setting and up to about 1st grade, I feel that it is important to try to keep the environment nut free at least in that child's class room especially if they eat in the classroom. Young children tend to be messy eaters so food gets everywhere and reactions are a big concern.
As they get older and are more likely to be eating in a cafeteria, I find it less important for other children's food to be nut free. Nut free tables do work and do not necessarily meant that the child has to be isolated. It is up to the teachers and lunch workers to seat the children such that friends who have nut free lunches can sit at the nut free table. Those who bring PB just sit at a different table. My son has done this since 1st grade and he has never had to sit alone. I say with mixed feelings that since there has been such a rise in food allergy, there are always lots of kids sitting there. As he's gotten older, he has learned how to keep away from others' food especially if it looks unsafe so it gradually has become less of an issue.

Posted on: Mon, 10/22/2007 - 8:41am
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MimiM ,
Althought I do not take back my intial reaction to PBJtime I do have to agree with you that it is better to educate her and encourage her to hang around here to learn more. I think that if she does this and hears first hand what it is like to live my DD's life then maybe , just maybe her tune will change and she will not feel like she did before. I guess one can only hope. But you did make a great point!!! How do we expect others to take us seriously if we are not armed with the tools to educate rather then just speak blank words. I how ever still am not sure how I feel about giving the peanut free school a grade stipulation. I guess I still don't see why we need to send our children to school with PBJ or even serve it . But I am working on that...lol

Posted on: Mon, 10/22/2007 - 9:22am
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MimiM,
We've been handling lunch time at my son's school the way you described it.
He is allowed to have friends with "nut-free" lunches eat with him at the PN-free table. It seems to be working so far.
LJ

Posted on: Mon, 10/22/2007 - 7:49pm
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I agree with Chris and we need to take opportunities to educate, as if we attack like we feel our children or us as parents have been attacked (and rightfully so), then the person wont stick around to be educated.
Lisa are you still out there? Anyone have Lisa's letter. She was a person who did the same thing, came here for understanding and now she advocates with us!
Anyone know where to find her first post?

Posted on: Tue, 10/23/2007 - 2:46am
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Dear PBJtime,
Can you please provide some statistics on how many people die each year due to seperation anxiety or social phobia?
Does the US department of education recognize that as a disability?
Please read the following information.
[url="http://www.aaaai.org/patients/gallery/prevention.asp?item=1a"]http://www.aaaai.org/patients/gallery/prevention.asp?item=1a[/url]
I do believe if you actually educated yourself about this situation you may not be so defensive about it.
People really do DIE (as in death, forever dead) from food allergies. It is rare but I do not want my son to be part of that statistic.
I am just a parent doing everything I can to keep my son away from a known poison.
For that, I am proud to be "over-reactive."
Our school is not peanut free, for legal fun, we call it risk reduction. In the last three years, no children at school have died from lack of peanut products served in the cafeteria and everyone is grateful for that.
If you take some time to learn about allergies you may understand it better. If you are just here to be ugly...we all live with plenty of that, thanks for stopping by.

Posted on: Tue, 10/23/2007 - 3:42am
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I don't even think this person (PBJ Time) is still reading these posts.
Either that, or they don't have a good enough factual comeback.
Let's hope that we educated him/her enough that he/she feels foolish now.

Posted on: Tue, 10/23/2007 - 2:38pm
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This will be my only resonse to this silliness:
The title of my post is "To The Over-Reactive Parents..."
Notice the word OVER, as in excessive, too much, etc.
You're only making yourselves look foolish, and you're only proving my point by responding to my thoughts on this issue. You must all be over-reactive parents of "PA" kids, otherwise you wouldn't be offended and feel the need to defend yourselves. The normal parents of children with peanut allergy aren't the ones ranting at me for expressing my opinion on this topic (which I stumbled across while doing research for a presentation on special education in the school system, by the way). The normal parents aren't the ones trying to ban peanut and other food products from schools. The normal parents aren't the ones isolating their kids and making them afraid to live life. So to all of you OVER-reactive parents, thanks for proving my point and giving me lots of material to include in my presentation.
Sincerely,
PeanutButterJellyTime

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 12:04am
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I was going to reply but decided not to waste my time or energy on ignorance. (I guess that is a reply) :-)

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 12:10am
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PBJ Time,
Anyone would want to defend themselves if they feel attacked. "Normal" people, too.
Good luck on your presentation. You'll need it.
LJ

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 1:25am
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Not addressing the original poster ---
I just want to share some information. The "otherside": At a recent visit with my obgyn, she told me her children attend schools where the peanut/treenut eating kids are at special tables and are the "excluded" ones. She said it was AMAZING how fast children told their parents to not include these items in their lunches because they wanted to sit with their friends. BEST IDEA I HAVE HEARD!!!

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 4:48am
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I have to reply to that one...we have a special table in our school as well, and so many kids want to sit there! We check lunches prior to allowing anyone to sit at the allergy table, and the disappointed looks when we have to say no says it all! Apparently, not having nut products is not an issue for the kids, is it...

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 7:06am
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The pn/free table is the place to be at my son's school.
I have to admit that before school started I was obsessing that he would be eating alone.
I work in the lunchroom 1x/week and the table is full. Makes me smile!

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 5:51pm
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PBJ,
Let me ask you, do you have a child who can die just from coming in contact with a food? Have you had to give your child emergency medicine by a shot and hope that the ambulance arrives in time?
Suggestion... why don't you actually read some of the stories on the net and there are plenty of stories. There are children who are that severly allergic to not even be able to be around it. It is like any disability, there are all degrees of it, aren't there? Open your mind and see all sides, because that is what good educators do (since you mentioned special education).
Our children have a hidden disability and yes they do. And that is why it is so hard for others to understand it, because they can't see it (not like a wheelchair or walker), sort of like religion, so you come across believers and apparently there are still many non-believers of this allergy. So, we will go on educating for our children because this is what we need to do, so they stay alive when they come across ignorant, non-believers of this allergy.
But good educators look at all sides, as it is seems from your last post, you only wanted to see what you wanted to see. It appears you came here to prove you were right. Did you think with your first post attacking people, would be the way to get some education on this allergy? Who was attacking who first?
There is a well known allergist (I think Dr. Wood, correct me if I'm wrong) who said if your child has this severe allergy and you are not getting finger pointed at you that you are "over-reactive" then you are not doing enough to keep your child safe, so thank you I will take his comment as a compliment and your use of "over-reactive" as a slap in the face.
So, last thing, educate yourself, you might learn something about this allergy but it looks like you already had your mind-made up and saw us all as foolish before you entered this forum to apparently get educated.

Posted on: Wed, 10/24/2007 - 11:09pm
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YES, we are all the "overreactive" parents here, as we are on a forum dedicated to KEEPING OUR KIDS SAFE! Great research there, to prove your point, by the way. Yes, we are the ones that actually care and are fighting for our kids, who cannot necessarily speak for themselves yet. And for every one of us, I am SURE you will run into a "normal" parent who thinks, "Oh, my DD is only a LITTLE allergic" "WE don't need to carry an epi-pen" "No problem, she can go ahead and eat that, it only says MAY contain." Yep, those normal parents are usually in what is called DENIAL, and their children, unfortunately, usually spend a great deal of time in and out of the emergency room. Let me see ...protective bubble or emergency room? I'll take protective bubble for now (as protective as it could ever get, seeing as there are people like you arund that do not care one bit about anyone but themselves), until more is known about these DEADLY allergies.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 12:06am
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I am sure you are just a troll trying to get your kicks out of taunting us.
Maybe you can visit the Topic in this forum called Reactions/Stories. There is a thread called "In Memory". A memorial to those people (mostly children) who have lost their lives from food allergies.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 12:16am
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pfmom2: AMEN!

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 12:31am
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Originally Posted By: PeanutButterJellyTimeThis will be my only resonse to this silliness:
You're only making yourselves look foolish, and you're only proving my point by responding to my thoughts on this issue. You must all be over-reactive parents of "PA" kids, otherwise you wouldn't be offended and feel the need to defend yourselves. The normal parents of children with peanut allergy aren't the ones ranting at me for expressing my opinion on this topic (which I stumbled across while doing research for a presentation on special education in the school system, by the way). The normal parents aren't the ones trying to ban peanut and other food products from schools. The normal parents aren't the ones isolating their kids and making them afraid to live life. So to all of you OVER-reactive parents, thanks for proving my point and giving me lots of material to include in my presentation.
Sincerely,
PeanutButterJellyTime
Sorry PBJ but since we "all must be over-reactive parents" you apparently haven't read [i]all[/i] of our posts. Go back and read mine. I actually defended you...to a point. Just to set the record straight, whether or not anyone here feels the same way as me about this I do not feel that anyone is over-reactive...just scared to death and rightfully so.
By the way, none of us are making fools out of ourselves but I would bet that most people here think that you are. How do you know what's "normal"? You've not even walked in our shoes. You are no expert. Have you researched articles on the severity of food allergies? Maybe you should rethink that.
Do you have children? If so, what ages? Do you not know any friends who have kids with food allergies? I don't just mean "it makes him hyper". I mean severe food allergies. Do you know what it's like to have a child have reactions (hives, swelling, breathing difficulty) when you can't even see the food but they must have mysteriously come in contact with it (such as a dog lick, or an invisably dirty fork, an airline seat, or close contact with another child who had eaten the food and wiped their hands on their shirt afterward)? Do you know what it's like to drop your child off at school, go to work and actually be able to not think about whether your child will come in contact with this food that they are deadly allergic to? If not, it's really not up to you to judge what is "normal".
BTW, just because someone disagrees with your post and wants to challenge you does not prove that you are right. You already knew how people felt about the issue before you even posted so you should have been prepared for people to challenge you.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 12:47am
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PBJ Time is just being moronic.
Let's all just move on.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 1:29am
MFA Mom's picture
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Joined: 08/31/2007 - 09:00

Having been on this board since 2003, I have seen many posters like the topic starter who only wants to agitate us. Normally, the best remedy is to not respond!
The only real one that I am aware of was Turlisa who converted to our side once she had the information about what our lives are like.
So, maybe we should just let this go and stop feeding the fire.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 1:26pm
SafeMomNow's picture
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Joined: 05/17/2007 - 09:00

You know we all have to "suffer" to help the others on this planet have a safer more productive life. How many of us will need an ambulance ride to save their life one day? Yet we ALL pull over so that ambulance can get to the hospital a few minutes faster and save a life. How many of us will call 911? Yet we pull over to let the fire department or police department through so that they can save a life, or perhaps prevent someone from harm. We didn't use our cell phones in many hospitals because it may have affected someone's pacemaker, or other medical equipment when cell phones first came out. Were we really "suffering"? or were we just inconvienced a little to save a life? I work in a hospital, and when the hospital stopped allowing fire arms on the premise you should have heard the complaints. People did not think they should be separated from their firearms just because "someone else" had a problem with it. Peanuts may cause a child's death, yes it may only be a few children, but isn't every child important? I don't think the parents who are seeking peanut free schools have children that have "a little rash", or sniffles with peanuts, but the ones that their child will die. My niece's school went peanut free last month. After weeks of parent meetings, and out-rage, and letters to the editor, and complaints that "compliance was not possible" in 3 days everything calmed down, the world did not come to an end, and it was like nothing really changed. Kids brought turkey sandwiches rather than peanut butter. I have always thought that society is judged by how we treat the members that need a little extra attention, really, is it "suffering", or just being a good citizen?

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 3:53pm
PeanutButterJellyTime's picture
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Joined: 10/01/2007 - 09:00

MimiM-
I make an exception to my "one-reply" rule for you. Before your second response, I hadn't seen your first. And I would like to apologize to you, and only you, since you obviously found my second post offensive. The reason I'm apologizing to you and not the others is because you were the only person who didn't prove my first point and over-react or blow a gasket when I voiced my opinion about peanut-free schools and such. Yours was the only response that impacted me because you were mature enough to see that not everyone thinks the same way and sees things as everyone else sees them. So thank you again for giving me hope that not all parents of kids with peanut allergy are over-reactive, and again I apologize for offending you, MimiM.
Best Regards.

Posted on: Thu, 10/25/2007 - 10:25pm
Nutforce's picture
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Joined: 06/02/2005 - 09:00

Originally Posted By: qdebbie1Dear PBJtime,
seperation anxiety or social phobia?
Does the US department of education recognize that as a disability?
pssst----yes--some forms of social phobias are recognized as hidden disabilities. It has nothing to do with eating pb or life/death situations, but I just wanted to answer that question.

Posted on: Fri, 10/26/2007 - 3:03am
MimiM's picture
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Joined: 10/10/2003 - 09:00

PB&J time,
Thank you for taking the time to look back at my first post and appreciate your apology. I voiced my opinion from my experience having a 4th grader. However, please try to rethink calling people here "over reactive". Many of the parents here have kids that are much younger. Young kids can't foresee the dangers as well as older kids so it's completely a completely different situation.
When my son was in preschool and kindergarten when all the kids ate in the same room, drooled on the same toys etc., I was scared to death of him having a reaction. Thank goodness, the preschool became "nut free" in the sense that they didn't serve nut products to the kids (meals were included). When he went to Kindergarten, the parents and teachers were totally supportive as well. They all ate in the classroom and the parents did not send in any foods with nuts. No one ever complained. In fact they aproached me to tell me how supportive they were (makes me cry to think about that). Honestly, if it hadn't been that way, I'm not really sure what I would have done. Home schooling was not an option since I work...plus he would have missed out on the social interactions that kindergarteners so desperately need.
Once he went to public school (first grade), things were different. They all eat in a cafeteria with separate tables for those with nuts and those without. There are so many kids with food allergies that he is never alone at that table. Also, since the school lunches don't have nuts, any of his friends who get the school lunch can sit there too. This has worked for him and for our personal situation but it's not like that in other schools so everyone's situation is different.
So again, my point: Parents here are not over reacting. Children really do die from anaphylaxis and none of us, including you, want that.
Despite how others may feel, I 'm glad you came here because whether or not you agree, I think (hope) that maybe you can take some of this with you so that you can view things in a different light.
Take care!

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