TNA DD tingling mouth when eating mango today...and ME TOO!

Author:
Publish date:
Updated on

Ok, I am feeling pretty dumb tonight. Although my DD's allergist, fairly laid back woman, never said to avoid mango...never really spoke to me about cross reactivity and such, I gave my cashew allergic daughter some mango today. She is THE WORLD'S PICKIEST EATER so when she asked me if she could try some of the mango that my son and I were having, I jumped at the chance to have her try something new. In the back of my head , I strained to remember if I'd read something about mangos and cashews. She ate a few bites and then looked kind of like she didnt like it, when at first bite she exclaimed 'i'll eat this every day'. Without me saying anything leading at all, she says 'my mouth is REALLY tingly. ' OMG talk about staring at her little mouth just waiting for the hives to come out....none came. THank God. I am assuming this was a reaction...am I right? After reading up a bit on mangos and cashews, i think the connection is now clear to me. Talk about feeling like a bad mommy. Funny thing though, I ate some of those mangoes yesterday too and both times for me, there was a strange tingly feeling in my mouth...almost like a minor burning feeling. I have always professed to have no FA's. But could this be *I* am allergic? What do you guys think? Did she react? Did I? Hmmmm. Should I NOT be feeding my DS of 20 month mangoes? He himself is EA and MA. Hmmmm

------------------ Jill DD, 5, TNA DS, 18 mo. EA, MA

On Mar 9, 2006

OK, I just went back to the mango to 'retest' myself. It was tingly burny on my tongue. And when my hubby got home, asked him to try the mango thinking maybe this is just the way mango is...tingly to the tongue. It tingled his tongue, too! Are we both sensitive to it? Or is it just the way mango is? Does mango tingle your tongue? Surely, we aren't all 'oral allergic' to mango in our family...or are we?

On Mar 9, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by lilpig99: [b]...I gave my cashew allergic daughter some mango today. She ate a few bites and then looked kind of like she didnt like it, when at first bite she exclaimed 'i'll eat this every day'. Without me saying anything leading at all, she says 'my mouth is REALLY tingly. ' OMG talk about staring at her little mouth just waiting for the hives to come out....none came. THank God. I am assuming this was a reaction...am I right?

...Funny thing though, I ate some of those mangoes yesterday too and both times for me, there was a strange tingly feeling in my mouth...almost like a minor burning feeling.[/b]

OK, I just went back to the mango to 'retest' myself. It was tingly burny on my tongue. And when my hubby got home, asked him to try the mango thinking maybe this is just the way mango is...tingly to the tongue. It tingled his tongue, too! Are we both sensitive to it? Or is it just the way mango is? Does mango tingle your tongue? Surely, we aren't all 'oral allergic' to mango in our family...or are we?

See this link: [url="http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/English/Oral_Food_Allergy.htm"]http://www.calgaryallergy.ca/Articles/English/Oral_Food_Allergy.htm[/url]

Oral Allergy Syndrome By Dr. Anthony Ham Pong, M.B., B.S., Paediatric Allergist - Ottawa Ontario. Published in the June 2000 AAIA newsletter.

Oral Allergy Syndrome is an allergy to certain raw fruits, vegetables, seeds, spices and nuts causing allergic reactions in the mouth and throat. These allergic reactions happen mostly in people with hayfever, especially spring hayfever due to birch pollen, and late summer hayfever due to ragweed pollen (Webmaster note: there is no ragweed pollen in British Columbia west of the Rockies).

Welcome to Spring! Try them again at another time of year. (Cooked fruits usually do not have this problem.)

Along with rotating foods, one thing I try to do for my allergies is eat foods [i]in season[/i]. I've seen some evidence that one of the many reasons for our growing FA's could be that we are now eating things year-round. If you eat things [i]in season[/i] in your area, you can avoid most oral allergy syndrome. That being said, I cannot imagine what "in season" is for mangoes? Not exactly a native crop for most areas. Daisy

On Mar 9, 2006

Thanks for the info. OAS, is very interesting...i had heard of it before but never researched it..until now. I can't believe because of pollens, a food reaction can occur...it just boggles my mind really. We have 3 birch trees in our yard, I wonder if they are pollenating in early March already. Needless to say, ugh....

Thanks again for the info.

On Mar 10, 2006

Many people are sensitive to mango skin. Most people will get an itchy mouth from mango if it's not prepared correctly, especially if you come in contact with the skin. It's delicious but be careful how you cut it. Here's an explanation:

[url="http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/magazine/index.cfm?fuseaction=article&articleID=1399&page=1&authID="]http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/magazi...&page=1&authID=[/url]

On Mar 10, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by Sandra Y: [b]Many people are sensitive to mango skin. Most people will get an itchy mouth from mango if it's not prepared correctly, especially if you come in contact with the skin. It's delicious but be careful how you cut it. Here's an explanation:

[url="http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/magazine/index.cfm?fuseaction=article&articleID=1399&page=1&authID="]http://www.deliciouslivingmag.com/magazi...&page=1&authID=[/url] [/b]

Hi Sandra,

We actually were eating Del Monte fresh refrigerated mango in the glass jars that you find in the produce section. So I don't think the skin is the problem...no hint of skin on it. Hmmmm....thanks for your thoughts and helpful information.

On Mar 10, 2006

I eat mangoes quite often. They do tingle! There is an acidic quality that almost seems to resemble carbonation.

I do not think you're having a reaction or a sensitivity.

On Mar 10, 2006

Almost like a very mild version of a persimmon, right?

I think that is just normal for unprocessed mango. Heat processing seems to make it go away.

One thing to be very careful of with mango, though, is that if you are either cashew allergic (as mentioned) OR if you have a very severe allergy to [i]rhus[/i] species plants (poison sumac, oak, ivy) the skin of the mango contains urushiol. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]

Let me just repeat that. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img] Ahhhhh, prednisone.

On Mar 10, 2006

I never knew about oral allergy syndrome either except that last summer my PA and TNA son started to complain of apples, strawberries and bananas --all on different occasions bothering his mouth -- up until that point he ate them every day. Well he is allergic to ragweed and latex -- so these things have a cross reactivity and OAS is part of it. he also wouldn't eat cantaloupe -- turns out he tested positive to that too! for the past 4 1/2 months we have avoided all his allergens and will do so until after ragweed season in aug/sept -- then we might start to introduce the fruit on a rotational basis????

On Mar 10, 2006

So, I did a bit of Googling, b/c I am of course PA (class V on rast), but also borderline class II/III for pistachio and cashew, as well as Class II for mango and avocado. I also have a very mild sensitivity to latex.

I've never intentionally eaten pistachio or cashew (but obviously had to have in order to score on the RAST), and I love mango, but it "makes my stomache feel funny" and my mouth a bit fuzzy. Avocado does the same thing. That's why my allergist threw them in there, at my request.

So, I just found this and the lightbulb went off. I have mostly all of the cross-reactivity's for the fruits and nuts (however, I have never had any poison ivy, poison oak, or anything...)

From here: [url="http://www.food-allergens.de/symposium-3-3/mango/mango-abstract.html"]http://www.food-allergens.de/symposium-3-3/mango/mango-abstract.html[/url]

Mango is the second most frequently cultivated tropical fruit worldwide. Most popular varieties of mango fruits are Tommy Atkins (South Africa), Osteen (Spain), Eden (Israel), and Ngowe (Kenya). Mango, together with pistachio and cashew, belongs to the Anacardiae family. All three foods may cause severe anaphylactic reactions. Immediate type oral symptoms are most frequently seen after ingestion of mango fruits. Besides allergic reactions to the fruits, sensitizations to mango pollen and seeds have been described. The incidence of mango fruit allergy is apparently high in subjects with "celery-mugwort-spice syndrome" or latex and pollen allergy, although this fact has not been established by double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). Two major mango allergens with 30 and 40 kDa and a 46-kDa-allergen (putative chitinase) have been identified. Cross-reactivities between mango fruit allergens and mugwort pollen, birch pollen, celery, carrot, and apple have been described. Further, latex and avocado allergens cross-react with mango allergens. The present data collection reviews detailed information on the prevalence and symptoms of mango allergy as well as diagnostic features, sensitization patterns, and the occurrence of cross-reactivities in tabular form.

------------------ 30-year old survivor of severe peanut/tree nut allergy

On Mar 11, 2006

Thanks for the info...my DD doesn't seem to suffer from any sesitivities/allergies to carrots, apples, she doesn't eat celery so I can't say for sure about that one.. But it really amazes me about all of this cross reactivity. Mind boggling to me really.

I am wondering if her allergist will want to test her for mango in light of this recent 'mouth tingling' she had.

I am just unsure if other people (non allergic or not) experience that tingling when they eat mango? If that is normal or not I guess....

Thanks all,

------------------ Jill DD, 5, TNA DS, 18 mo. EA, MA

On Mar 11, 2006

Quote:

Originally posted by TNAmom: [b]I eat mangoes quite often. They do tingle! There is an acidic quality that almost seems to resemble carbonation.

I do not think you're having a reaction or a sensitivity.[/b]

Thanks TNAmom...in fact, my husband used the work 'carbonation' to describe the feeling he had. So that makes sense. I hope that others respond here with similar thoughts...

Related