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Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 12:05am
niche's picture
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Joined: 02/05/2007 - 09:00

Hi, sorry this is so hard. You are doing great learning so quickly while painful may save your child from additional reactions. I agree with many above on the lableing etc. I wanted to put a note about the reactions - there are not always hives. I read somewhere that in many of the most severe reactions there are no hives. Also vomitting can be a sign of a very severe reaction - I believe there is a thread on that. At first I wanted to be more relaxed with my restrictions than some other PA moms that I knew - within a month my son had a reaction to a bagged bakery bread. Lesson learned.
You are doing great,
Nichele
DS 5 PA TNA
DD 10 mo ?????

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 12:44am
qdebbie1's picture
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Joined: 02/10/2005 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Going Nuts:
[b] Hey, I never said you were [i]feeling[/i] OK, just that you were doing OK, LOL. You're allowed to feel awful, cry, kick and scream for awhile. Heck, every now and again I feel that way too, 11+ years into this.
I promise, it will get better. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
Amy
[/b]
I have been doin it for 9 years and I cried reading the post.
It gets better.
Since you asked [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
I would think again about the processed/manufactured in idea. I know it narrows down your choices. I would ask yourself this: What food item is worth the risk?
No matter how small the risk is, its still a risk.
You are going great, keep learning. I still do.

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 12:51am
McCobbre's picture
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Joined: 04/16/2005 - 09:00

I would second the post about reactions not always having hives, etc.
My reactions do not have hives. They start out with this spaciness like I've had a glass of wine. Then they are GI (diarrhea). I haven't really had vomiting (I almost did, but I didn't do it--just started to, but it did make my esophagus start to react).
And, as if this weren't enough, my reactions aren't even immediate. They either happen 20 minutes or [b]2 HOURS[/b] later. Yep.
Now, those are shellfish reactions, but there are folks on here who have the same symptoms for PA reactions (the same thing is happening to the body).
And get this--for sesame reactions (I'm sesame allergic)--none of these things happen. My ears close up, and if it's a bad reaction, I get hives.
I'm saying this to let you know that one reaction can't typically predict the next, and there are so many different kinds of symptoms. And the severity (or lack thereof) of one reaction does not predict the severity of the next reaction.
One of the regulars on this board knows of someone who had a "mild" peanut allergy. Her tongue would tingle. For years that was her only symptom (she was an adult). Then, one time, she went into cardiac arrest. Really, you could have hives one time and go into anaphylactic shock the next. You just can't tell.
That's why it's so important to be careful.
I don't mean to add to your freak out scale. I don't. I just want to give you some information that isn't always out there. It's here on the boards, but it may be a while until you find it.

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 2:07am
Anonymous's picture
Anonymous (not verified)

Quote:Originally posted by My2girls:
[b]omg..omg..omg....huh...you guys think i;m doing ok? i sound ok? well i'm not. i cry all the time. i'm so confused and not ready for this but i have to be. [/b]
Yes, you are doing ok. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] You don't have your head in the ground saying *it won't happen to my child, she'll be ok*. You are asking a lot of questions and taking in a lot of information. You've reached this point very quickly.
Crying and being confused -- well of course you are. As you get less confused about these issues you will cry less. There are positives. I think we actually have a thread around here somewhere about that. I'll see if I can find it for you. I think you need to see a silver lining.
Edited to add: I couldn't find the thread on this board, so I posted a link to a page on the FAST web-site about *Good Things* about food allergies.
[This message has been edited by AnnaMarie (edited May 04, 2007).]

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 2:40am
Jen224's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2006 - 09:00

quote:
Originally posted by My2girls:
"omg..omg..omg....huh...you guys think i;m doing ok? i sound ok? well i'm not. i cry all the time. i'm so confused and not ready for this but i have to be."
My DS has been diagnosed PA for exactly 1 year last week. We celebrated because we went the entire year without a single reaction. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] I owe this reaction-less year to this board--volumes of information and support that you can't get anywhere else!
That said, I cried nearly every day for the first month. It sucks and hurts and you think it's the end of the world and you imagine the worst case scenario and everything in between right now. Totally normal.
It didn't take me the whole year to get comfortable with this--in fact, I doubt I'll ever be comfortable! However, I'm calmer and we live our life now. You won't always feel overwhelmed and crying, and really, b/c you do right now means you GET it and that's a good thing.
OK--sorry to hijack the 'plan' thread--so let me just say one thing here:
Everything looks excellent except, like nearly everyone, I would go with a peanut-free facility. It just takes the guess work out right now. Someone here gave me the advice to start with a super strict comfort zone until you feel like you have a handle on this PA. I agree--build as you learn and trust that others understand it too (my MIL gets it, but my dad is not even close). I can say after year that my zone level did change--it just got smaller and smaller the more I did learn. You may feel the other way as you learn more, but at least then it would be an educated reason to have broader comfort zone.
In the beginning, I made a lot of stuff from scratch (no it wasn't easy and yes it was incredibly inconvenient). Now we eat more commercial products. Get a binder or create a word document on your computer and start calling manufacturers. Keep a list of safe foods. Mine is alphabetized by company, but my mom wanted me to make her one that was organzied by meals (eg., one thing under Breakfast was Lenders bagels and Smuckers jelly). Organize it so it makes sense to you.
Jen

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 3:17am
tando's picture
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Joined: 06/13/2003 - 09:00

We bring cupcakes everywhere. I bake regularly and freeze them unfrosted. Keep container of homemade frosting in refridgerator. Very easy to bring along to a party. Never had a complaint from a parent or DS. Have occasionally had other children request a cupcake like DS instead of the birthday cake.
We also keep cupcakes at school in the nurse's freezer.
Once everyone is used to the system, its really quite easy to maintain.
T.

Posted on: Fri, 05/04/2007 - 3:24am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

another story to share that made my decision to never let my kids eat other peoples food....
At my sons Kindergarten Halloween party this fall, moms brought all kinds of goodies, and of course I brought my son his own stuff to enjoy. I had looked the day before for some sugar cookies to make and decorate for him to share, something fun and safe for him. I found a roll of Pilsbury Sugar Cookies, grabbed it and headed ot the check out. I forgot to check the label so I am standing there and glance down, I about had a heart attack, seriously! I know carry the package with me to show others how very careful I have to be at all times....
here's the ingredients for the Ready To Bake Pillsbury Sugar Cookies....enriched flour bleached (wheat flour, niacin, iron, thiamin, mononitrate, riboflavin, folic acid) sugar, partially hydrogenated soybean and cottonseed oil, water eggs, salt, baking soda, sodium aluminum phosphate, natural and artificial flavor, WALNUT FLOUR, MACADAMIA NUT FLOUR, PEANUT FLOUR.....if my son would have eaten these, he would be in SERIOUS trouble. And what freaked me out even more, at the party one mom kept offering my son sugar cookies "they're just sugar cookies, they're okay".....you never know, so the risk just isn't worth it.
------------------
Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

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