Those of you who have chosen not to test ...

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In connection with e-mom's current threads on rast tests, those of you who have chosen not to do any further testing after finding out about the PA allergy, post here and tell us what has influenced your decision not to test. Erik, you come specifically to mind here...and we all value your opinions [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 22, 2003

Well, I could rephrase the question.. Why *would* you test? PA is PA, regardless of numbers. It's unpredictable, so why over-medicalise it?

I am curious as to why people go to the allergist on a yearly basis to have tests. Unless you suspect you've overgrown it, I see no use to more testings.

On Sep 22, 2003

well....some allergists suggest testing every so often to see if the numbers are going down on a regular basis which would suggest a possible outgrowing of the allergy. I know my allergist considers a very low or class 0 (even if you have previously reacted) to be a sign of having outgrown the allergy and a reason to do an oral challenge. I pretty much agree with you, darthcleo, that PA is PA regardless of the numbers.

Still, I do think we learn alot about this allergy from each other and our various stories which is all I'm after here.

On Sep 22, 2003

DD has had asthma and eczema since she was baby and allergies seemed to be a trigger to her asthma. She was treated by our pediatrician in relation to her symptoms, not by formal test results. In fact, I was told at that time that allergy testing would be inaccurate until she was at least 4 y/o. I knew she was PA when she was a toddler, but still did not test her.

It was not until she was 8 y/o that we saw an allergist. We didnt go there to be diagnosed with PA or EA, but as a last resort to find an answer to a vomiting problem. I told the doctor she was pa/tna. He confirmed it and wants to check it every couple of years to see if she might be outgrowing it. Since she has had recent reactions, I don't think this is happening, but I guess it is my hope that she will be one of the lucky ones. I probably will bring her in every couple of years in the hope of seeing the numbers go down and hopefully outgrow this allergy.

As I am reading through this I am thinking that this is probably a very false hope. Maybe its like the lottery..... you never know, maybe one time the test will be negative, probably not, but we keep playing....

Maggie

On Sep 23, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by maggie0303: [b]Since she has had recent reactions, I don't think this is happening, but I guess it is my hope that she will be one of the lucky ones. I probably will bring her in every couple of years in the hope of seeing the numbers go down and hopefully outgrow this allergy.

As I am reading through this I am thinking that this is probably a very false hope. Maybe its like the lottery..... you never know, maybe one time the test will be negative, probably not, but we keep playing....

Maggie[/b]

Yes, it is my hope as well. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Sep 23, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by darthcleo: [b]Well, I could rephrase the question.. Why *would* you test? PA is PA, regardless of numbers. It's unpredictable, so why over-medicalise it?

I am curious as to why people go to the allergist on a yearly basis to have tests. Unless you suspect you've overgrown it, I see no use to more testings.

[/b]

Yes, Darthcleo, I do agree with you on why people go to the allergist if they are consistently showing that they are allergic. Our first allergist even told us not to bother with blood tests because once you have it you have it.

However, I think that (and I could be wrong) many kids with pa haven't had any type of reaction in years (like mine) and we are just wondering if he is still allergic and are curious as to what they will be categorized. I personally do want to start tracking ds to see if we are one of the "lucky" ones. I do know that these tests are not that great but I have to start somewhere.

I have a pretty laid back attitude with his allergy. I do keep him safe wherever he goes but I'm not over the top with it. (I'm definitely not saying that anyone is, I'm just trying to get across how I am).

BTW, I haven't seen you around in a little while and I've missed your posts [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 23, 2003

DW (Ann) is anaph to peanuts, has been all her life, but 30 years ago, there was no testing (ok, maybe there was, but they didnt do any on her). Shes just avoided all her life... She doesnt have an epi (just a jr, for Caitlin).

Shes never been tested, nor will she be. She's also had OAS to melons, shellfish, hummus (chick peas?).

Even IF she tested negative to peanuts, she'd still avoid them, KWIM? She doesnt need them, and its quite easy for her to avoid, right now at least.

Jason Caitlin 4-17-00 Allergic to Dairy, Egg, Wheat, Bananas, Grapes, Rye, Sesame, Beef and Avoiding Latex and all Nuts Sara 2-13-98 NKA (avoiding nuts) Meghan 2-28-03 dx'ed Reflux - Alimentum feeder, Zantac - 1.2ml 2x/day [url="http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin"]http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin[/url]

On Sep 23, 2003

Okay, just to clarify my intentions....I certainly am not passing any judgement either way if you do or do not test. I merely wanted some opinions as to why people have decided not to test. Usually there is a reason or a story behind it that we all can learn from. I have two top Chicago allergists and they disagree with each other on some important things regarding this allergy. So.....other peoples real stories help us all to get an over all picture of what's really happening and not just what the studies show. (I'm not saying the studies are bad, but we all know these things can be flawed sometimes.)Hope this clears up any misunderstandings....

On Sep 23, 2003

It's crystal!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

On Sep 23, 2003

Quote:

Originally posted by nikky: [b]In connection with e-mom's current threads on rast tests, those of you who have chosen not to do any further testing after finding out about the PA allergy, post here and tell us what has influenced your decision not to test. Erik, you come specifically to mind here...and we all value your opinions [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img][/b]

Hi Nikky,

Here is my history.

When I was 2 years old, my Mom gave me a bite of her peanut butter sandwich and I ended up having a big reaction. The doctor came by (this was the old days when doctors did house calls). He asked my Mom what I ate for lunch, and she said I had a cheese sandwich and tomato soup. He said "what else??? there must have been something else". My Mom mentioned the bite of the peanut butter sandwich, and our doctor said "he has a peanut allergy".

I was never tested as a child, as the reaction (face swelled up) was severe enough that the doctor said it was unlikely I would outgrow it. I had no further reactions in my childhood but between about 9 years old and 14 years old I had a few reactions. They were all caused by cross contamination with baked goods (and in one case a no name chocolate bar) and in those days, we didn't even know what cross-contamination was so I went to an allergist for the first time about the age of 12. I had a skin test, and peanuts was positive. (TEST # 1).

About 10 years later (in my early 20s). my ragweed allergy really began to get bad and it was causing severe symptoms so I went to an alergist for the second time. I had skin tests and was postitive for several pollens (ragweed, june grass, cross grass, birch, etc). The allergist did a really quick skin test for peanut, and once he saw the redness he removed the serum. So this was my second test for peanuts (TEST # 2). I had allergy shots for my ragweed allergy which helped immensely!! They worked very well.

The reason I have not had any additional allergy tests is that I am quite certain that I was always be allergic to peanuts so there is no point. Plus, I have heard that repeated exposures to peanut protein [b]may[/b] increase the allergic response over time, so I try to minimize my contact with peanut.

One option would be to have a blood test so I can see what my allergic numbers are. I am thinking that next time I visit the allergist maybe I would have a blood test as it would be interesting to know my results.

So the short answer is that I have only been tested for peanut allergy twice as I assumed it would be a lifetime allergy so no point being tested on a regular basis. But things may have been different if I was a child who had not had severe reactions.

Hope this helps [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Sep 23, 2003

I think my DW agrees with Erik.

Shes always had it, and always had reactions. Shes had a couple x-contam issues as well, probably 3 in the last 10 years.

We've joked when we go for Caitlins rast testing, to get a vial from all of us, and test us all for things... Just to confuse people. (A wacky sense of humor)

Jason Caitlin 4-17-00 Allergic to Dairy, Egg, Wheat, Bananas, Grapes, Rye, Sesame, Beef and Avoiding Latex and all Nuts Sara 2-13-98 NKA (avoiding nuts) Meghan 2-28-03 dx'ed Reflux - Alimentum feeder, Zantac - 1.2ml 2x/day [url="http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin"]http://community.webshots.com/user/jtolpin[/url]

On Sep 23, 2003

I agree to a point. If your child has not had a reaction in 2 years and is not airborn or touch sensitive...would you suspect a possiblity that s/he has outgrown it? I would. A lot of it would be wishful thinking too, I know, and unrealistic wishful thinking, but how else would you know.

We intend on testing every 2 years per our allergists recommendation.

On Sep 23, 2003

My 8 3/4 year old daughter has pa and tna. We initially did no testing and were not planning on doing any. Our allergist was of the mind that we knew she was allergic to peanuts and walnuts because she had obviously reacted to both. At that time our allergist's thinking was that peanut allergies were life threatening and life long. She did not feel we would gain anything by testing. Several years passed, and then news of some kids outgrowing pa were publicized. At that point I read (in various places) that it was recommended for pa kids to have a Cap Rast done every couple of years to see if the numbers were going down at all. This is the path we are currently on. So far she's only had done - almost 2 years ago - and she was between a class 5 and 6 for both peanuts and walnuts. We have the prescription for another Cap Rast, and will probably take her in soon to get it done. HTH, Miriam

On Sep 23, 2003

We have never RAST tested for peanut because we have never been on a health plan that will cover it. The information obtained would not affect the precautions and medications needed for the allergy.

The logic has been that since the child has already had documented history of severe reactions to ingestion and mild reactions to contact it is not medically necessary.

The allergist's position was that we know already there is an allergy so severe it would be hazardous to scratch test, and the information from the blood test will not tell us anything new or affect treatment. Hanging a number on it won't change the fact he reacts severely. He thought it was a better use of our money to scratch test him for other allergies we weren't sure about.

If my second child hadn't been accidentally food challanged for peanut I would have had her tested despite the cost.That would be worth it as that would have told us something we didn't already know.

On Sep 23, 2003

I would continue to test for all food allergies until age 18 because I discovered at age 16 that I had outgrown my egg, dairy, beef, and soy allergies. I know that I will never outgrow my peanut/ tree nut/ sesame allergies. However, every new allergist I see re-tests justs for their own knowledge. I will not ask for the test at this point though because I knwo I am still anaphylactic and will not ever outgrow it. If the numbers went down it would probably would because I haven't been exposed in a while.

Allison

On Sep 23, 2003

Thank you all for your responses. I guess for my ds we will test every few years and just follow the numbers to see if there is a consistency to them. He recently tested a class 0. He has not reacted since he was 1.5 yrs old. Crossing fingers here.... [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Mar 19, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by nikky: [b]I have two top Chicago allergists and they disagree with each other on some important things regarding this allergy...[/b]

Nikky, does either one of these allergists support a CAP RAST test instead of skin testing? I'm in the NW burbs of Chicago and looking for a new allergist. Can you recommend one?

Thanks!

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