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Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 9:24am
luisa's picture
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Joined: 12/23/2004 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
...fitting the "autism spectrum" in some way means that one is either defective, must have suffered some damage, or otherwise unable to have a successful (by any standard) or somewhat happy life. KWIM? I just don't necessarily see it that way. It hasn't been my experience either.
[/b]
Same here. And the experience of a lot of people I know. Best one I have heard is "autism is not a disability but a different ability". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
BTW how about the autistic basketball player on the news? Pretty cool!
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Luisa
"Kites rise highest against the wind - not with it."

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:31am
Sarahfran's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by luisa:
[b] BTW how about the autistic basketball player on the news? Pretty cool!
[/b]
Why does everyone think that was pretty cool? I tought it was pretty annoying and disgraceful. Here's this kid with enormous talent for basketball (very few people can hit three point shots like that!) and no one ever considered putting him in to play until the last game of his last year of school when they were all but certain of a win. Why? Because he's autistic. I thought--before I saw the interviews and video clips--that maybe the other team was just letting him have his moment and not defending, or that he wouldn't be able to interact with the other team members in a useful way or that the noise and chaos of the game would bother him. Nope. He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game. I think the coach shouldn't be advertising this event AT ALL--he should be hiding in his office, mortified that he never considered this kid as a serious player before because of his disability. And here's all these people congratulating themselves that they let this special ed kid have his moment in the sun and no one is saying "what about the other three and a half years?"
Think of it in terms of peanut allergy. Suppose the school system said that your child couldn't go on any field trips because it was too dangerous for them, no way to make it peanut-safe. So for 12 years your child stays in the library while the other kids go off on field trips. Then for the special senior trip the school makes an exception and decides that no peanut products will be allowed and they'll take precautions in public places. And guess what? It's easy! The student with the allergy has a great time and has no health problems and the other students don't really care that they can't have their Snickers bars. So the school advertises what great people they are that they made this accomodation one time for their disabled student. Would we be saying "that's pretty cool?" Or would we be saying "why didn't you do this the other 12 years?"
Sarah

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:39am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Sarahfran:
[b] Why does everyone think that was pretty cool? I tought it was pretty annoying and disgraceful. Here's this kid with enormous talent for basketball (very few people can hit three point shots like that!) and no one ever considered putting him in to play until the last game of his last year of school when they were all but certain of a win. Why? Because he's autistic. I thought--before I saw the interviews and video clips--that maybe the other team was just letting him have his moment and not defending, or that he wouldn't be able to interact with the other team members in a useful way or that the noise and chaos of the game would bother him. Nope. He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game. I think the coach shouldn't be advertising this event AT ALL--he should be hiding in his office, mortified that he never considered this kid as a serious player before because of his disability. And here's all these people congratulating themselves that they let this special ed kid have his moment in the sun and no one is saying "what about the other three and a half years?"
Think of it in terms of peanut allergy. Suppose the school system said that your child couldn't go on any field trips because it was too dangerous for them, no way to make it peanut-safe. So for 12 years your child stays in the library while the other kids go off on field trips. Then for the special senior trip the school makes an exception and decides that no peanut products will be allowed and they'll take precautions in public places. And guess what? It's easy! The student with the allergy has a great time and has no health problems and the other students don't really care that they can't have their Snickers bars. So the school advertises what great people they are that they made this accomodation one time for their disabled student. Would we be saying "that's pretty cool?" Or would we be saying "why didn't you do this the other 12 years?"
Sarah[/b]
thank you from my heart, Sarah. I cried when I saw that video. But probably not for the same reasons as some others.

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:50am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[b]"He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game."[/b]
but would you consider him "slightly" autistic? I know people who people who are completely functional, maybe even excelling in the social and academic and professional realms who are [i]as autistic as all get out[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 1:05am
momma2boys's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Jason McElwain, the basketball player you are speaking of, lives nearby. From what I understand on our local news, is this. He was considered too small to join the JV team, so he took on the role of team manager. He stayed in that role on the varsity team. He had a pregame ritual where he would practice his shots. Because he was always so dedicated to the team, the coach told him to suit up for the last game and he would get him in. So apparently it isn't that he was a player on the team that sat suited up day after day expecting to play. Now I don't know much about basketball, so I don't know if team managers normally play on the team as well or not.
So it wasn't that so much that I found offensive. The coach was quoted as being an 'emotional wreck' because he was so proud and excited.
What I found condescending is that he is described as 'highly functional autistic', yet everyone is so amazed that the kid can score in a basketball game. Just because he is autistic, you would assume the kid can't make a shot?
I don't know if anyone saw it, but a couple days ago President Bush was in the area and Jason was there to meet him. I thought he was kinda condescending to him too, talking to him like he was 3. Not that that surprises me!

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 1:30am
luisa's picture
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Joined: 12/23/2004 - 09:00

Sarahfran - Pretty cool is the boy - not the coach or the school or whoever else.
Pretty cool that he had a chance to show the world that autism is not the monster people think. And hey there is a lot of undiscovered talent out there - austistic or not.
Pretty cool that instead of being treated as incapable for 12 more years he now has a chance to be famous, make some money for his future and teach a valuable lesson.
Pretty cool he is happy.
Of course it is not cool that he was disregarded despite of his talent. It is awful. And the whole thing is going to be "hollywoodized" for sure. But that is the real world out there - I know by experience. And if we want to change narrow minds we need stories of triumph over gloomy misconceptions.
That's my opinion as a mother of a kid in the spectrum. I am pretty sure the mom of this boy is having a good time. Who doesn't want to see their kid shine?
So my pretty cool was quoted as a bad thing. I meant it as a compliment to the boy and his family who have been thru a lot I am sure. That's what I would tell the boy if I ever met him. HE is pretty cool indeed. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
l
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Luisa
"Kites rise highest against the wind - not with it."
[This message has been edited by luisa (edited March 18, 2006).]
[This message has been edited by luisa (edited March 18, 2006).]

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 4:16am
nutty-mom's picture
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Joined: 02/19/2004 - 09:00

"My 5 yo is recovered from autism..."
ahensely- I know that this isn't an autism board but I'm curious about your statement above. A good friend has an autistic son and is trying different therapies. I've never heard anyone say someone had recovered from autism. Are there specific therapies you used? Just curious about your story....
Thanks.

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 11:16am
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Joined: 08/23/2005 - 09:00

You can reply to me privately if you want - [email]ahensley11@cox.net[/email]
We have done many biomedical interventions including chelation (heavy metal detox), b12 injections, digestive enzymes, ProEFA (omegas) oil, Vitamin and mineral supplement (like 12,000 % of the RDA of b6), AIT (auditory intergration training), years of speech, OT, music therapy, hippo therapy, swim therapy, gymastics therapy etc, social skills groups, gluten free casein free diet (for 18 months), developmental preschool for 2 years, chriopratic, acupuncture (without needles), cranial sacral therapy, Nystatin for yeast overgrowth, probiotics, etc. Basically you name - there is a good chance we tried it.
My son will be 6 tomorrow - he is in a typical kindergarten class without an aide, speech average, above average to genius IQ (started reading shortly after learning to talk at age 3), has plenty of friends and sleep overs, and 90% of the hyper senstivity to noise is gone. He still is working on some fine motor stuff (holding his pencil correctly) and is maybe a year socially immature; but I don't think his peers notice.. at least not yet. In fact, there are almost 30 kids coming to his party tomorrow (I know a little extreme - I couldn't help it... I am so proud of him).
I believe the body needs to heal biomedically, before it can begin to learn - once his gut healed and he was able to process speech (helped by the AIT), he was then able to learn. In all fairness, I must say Noah was never a child that had severe autism but he had enough... He offically lost his diagnosis last summer. We started biomedical interventions at age 2.
Anyone is welcome to email me privately. I have at least 2 friends with recovered children also (from autism) but many many more that are "recovering" but not there yet.
There will be a Dateline segment in April that is about a research study with children with autism doing chelation. The study is double blind placebo controlled study. I don't have the exact date yet - Have your friend check out generationrescue.com to learn more about biomedical treatments for autism... also - I volunteer for Raising Special Kids in AZ and am happy to talk with parents on how to get started on the biomedical path.
Andrea

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 7:51pm
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ahensley:
[b]We have done many biomedical interventions including chelation (heavy metal detox), b12 injections, digestive enzymes, ProEFA (omegas) oil, Vitamin and mineral supplement (like 12,000 % of the RDA of b6), AIT (auditory intergration training), years of speech, OT, music therapy, hippo therapy, swim therapy, gymastics therapy etc, social skills groups, gluten free casein free diet (for 18 months), developmental preschool for 2 years, chriopratic, acupuncture (without needles), cranial sacral therapy, Nystatin for yeast overgrowth, probiotics, etc. Basically you name - there is a good chance we tried it.
My son will be 6 tomorrow - he is in a typical kindergarten class without an aide, speech average, above average to genius IQ (started reading shortly after learning to talk at age 3), has plenty of friends and sleep overs, and 90% of the hyper senstivity to noise is gone. He still is working on some fine motor stuff (holding his pencil correctly) and is maybe a year socially immature; but I don't think his peers notice.. at least not yet. In fact, there are almost 30 kids coming to his party tomorrow (I know a little extreme - I couldn't help it... I am so proud of him).
[/b]
I could share with you thoughts about each of my children, but since I've shared much on this site about my oldest, but I'll share about my youngest, since you gave a
pretty good description of my own 6 year old.
Except that besides early childhood for 2 years, a year of "at risk" preschool, and speech therapy/ot through the school, he has not had one iota of other treatment. (I mean, aside from a handful of private ot/pt appointments. And I do mean handful. That said, we do a lot of activities with our cubs. I mean they are exposed to life in general. And life not so general. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
His label too, was officially "dropped" by the early childhood program/at risk program and he has not been relabelled since. But what is a label? They probably *could* place it again, and I'd be ok with that.
Among some not "typical" things, he did not speak until age 4. Was always very bright, tho. I knew he was years before he ever talked. He still is. I knew it the first time we made [i]real purposeful, intentional, concerted, eye contact[/i] and he kept returning and returning to mine. (Changing table, probably 3 or 4 months old. My mom was talking to me while I changed his diaper and he kept making eye contact with her, then me, her, then me. [i]Laughing [b]out loud[/b] at us.[/i] I think he was like: "Hey, if you want me to play the script and make eye contact with only *the mama* I will, but wow, I got two of you at my beck and call??? [i]COOL[/i]. I could run with this."
His speech and IQ? Probably could keep a university professor engaged for quite some time. He's not "typical" in many ways, but I don't view that as something that needs to be fixed. For one, he's very noticeable in that I need to hide from school staff and parents most of the time if I don't want to end up discussing his more charming attributes. I mean, he has an extrememly intelligent and engaging personality, draws people out, (lol, whether they want to be drawn out or not) and is a charmer. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/cool.gif[/img] (and imagine, having two pretty non-descript, keep to themselves parents, what a burden he has.) They say God doesn't give you more than you can bear. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]).
Don't know if I could manage a kindergarten b-party with 30 persons.............. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
That said, I empty his schoolbag of numerous friendly notes from his classmates (girls in particular) each school day. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/rolleyes.gif[/img] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img] Most kindergarten scrawl with phone numbers (partially need to be deciphered) for [i]playdates[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/eek.gif[/img]
He asks me to check his bag while he eats his favorite snack at a given time each day after school.
And he watches me intently while I do so. Like I said, he's extremely intelligent......and communicative. I mean, he makes it a point that I know.
Reading. yes. hmmmmmmmmm. They began kindergarten with a "word" ring. They bring home words on index cards to place on the ring. He scours the newspaper looking for *favorite* words or those that *look* interesting and requests I help him decipher them. Or he comes to me with his *personal favorites* (verbally) and requests I help him spell them while he writes them on an index card to place on his "word ring". Honestly? I was hoping to go the "phonics" route with him, looks like I won't have a huge window of opportunity, but hey, he's always set the pace. Whether it was ahead, or behind schedule, per se, I mean. And apparently, it's been appropriate for him.
My child is not "cured". He's as "autistic" as all get out. I do not say cured, since I don't believe he was ever broken, disabled, or otherwise "ill" in any way to begin with. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Just himself. Just like many other people in my family.
That said, I'm sure his peers notice. At least the more perceptive ones. I'm sure he will continue to be noticed throughout his life. (grin) He's as personable, and intelligent as he is driven. Extremely driven. But hey, that's him. People can like it or not. I could never change that, even if I wanted to. I can honestly say he is who he was created to be. And that it is [i]good[/i].
General Disclaimer: I am [b]not[/b] offering advice in any manner or form. [b]ABSOLUTELY NOT.[/b] I could be living on a wing and a [i]prayer[/i]. Risking my child's future. Missing the Big Picture. [i]Doing it all wrong.[/i]
We might have made some HUGE MISTAKES.
I could be a bad mommy. Or I might just be on the other side of the looking glass. I am only describing my own individual, highly personal, and possibly unique unto myself situation. I can't speak for anyone else, just myself. Individual Mileage May Vary. I could just have dumb luck.

Posted on: Sun, 03/19/2006 - 6:08am
Darkmage's picture
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Joined: 10/01/2004 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b] what makes one "slightly" autistic? Or "profoundly" autistic? [/b]
MommaBear, I have to say that I have no experience at all with Autism. My sil lives on her street and knows her, and she (my sil) is the one who told me that the kids are "slightly autistic". I didn't pry. The neighbor mom and I have shouted "hi" to each other across our yards, and our kids have talked thru the fence, but that is as much contact as we have. All our neighbors are faily "odd" and keep to themselves around here. I've been knocking my head against the wall trying to find a same-age playmate for my son, but nobody plays in their front yards anymore.
I digress.... I meant no offence. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
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