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Posted on: Thu, 03/16/2006 - 8:54pm
becca's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

My neighbor with a son on the spectrum, maybe, of autism, does see that many of the children she meets, with similar "issues" for lack of better terminology(since her child is not technically dx' with autism), have food sensetivities, texture sensetivities and sometimes allergies.
Not specific allergies, but more of a global thing. So, her observation(just one person) is whatever is "causing" autism, PDD, or SID issues, seems to include with it, some food sensetivities and/or allergies. Either the foods can dramatically influence the behavior, or the children have diagnosed allergies or intolerances.
That said, her child has no known reactions to foods, but does eat PB and nuts alot because of aversions to many foods(like Claire was porbably trying to express!). I think my dd has mild SID, really is integrating well and I never got intervention. It is a hindsight is 20/20 thing, but the whole reason we tried PB, was due to her low weight, texture sensetivites with food, aversion to meats, and new foods, etc... her eating is really the main symptom of her SID and it goes wayyy beyond what others call picky.
Interesting. becca
[This message has been edited by becca (edited March 17, 2006).]

Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 1:44am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Lam:
[b]My PA son is nowhere near the autism spectrum.
My nonPA son has NLD (nonverbal learning disability - basically Aspergers), so the PA/sutism link doesn't work for us. [/b]
My "Aspergers" children are on the Autism Spectrum (be definition), I understand. That said, the NLD profile is an excellent fit too. I mean, no two are exactly alike. Whether it's NVD or Aspergers.
Tomatoes.
but hey no advice.

Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 7:10am
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Joined: 10/01/2004 - 09:00

There is no history of any autoimmune disease, food allergies or autism on my side of the family. There were a few food sensitivies (not allergies) and arthritis on dh's side. Our son's PA & DA just seemed to come out of the blue.
My backyard neighbor's kids are slightly autistic (so I've been told), but have no food allergies that I'm aware of. She was handing out PB treats at Halloween, so I really doubt either one has PA.
------------------
[i][b]Allergy Eliminator [/b][/i]

Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 8:39am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

ahensley -
My fault - I misunderstood. If it's one child on autism spectrum and a different child with PA, then we DO fit that profile!
MommaBear - I was thinking that ahensley meant that the autism spectrum child was the one with the PA. My mistake - she said that the autism spectrum child has SIBLINGS with PA. We definitely fit that. (I do agree with your "tomatoes.")
I hope I have it straight this time!! [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 9:08am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Darkmage:
[b]
My backyard neighbor's kids are slightly autistic (so I've been told), but have no food allergies that I'm aware of.
[/b]
what makes one "slightly" autistic? Or "profoundly" autistic?

Posted on: Fri, 03/17/2006 - 9:24am
luisa's picture
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Joined: 12/23/2004 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by MommaBear:
[b]
...fitting the "autism spectrum" in some way means that one is either defective, must have suffered some damage, or otherwise unable to have a successful (by any standard) or somewhat happy life. KWIM? I just don't necessarily see it that way. It hasn't been my experience either.
[/b]
Same here. And the experience of a lot of people I know. Best one I have heard is "autism is not a disability but a different ability". [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]
BTW how about the autistic basketball player on the news? Pretty cool!
------------------
Luisa
"Kites rise highest against the wind - not with it."

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:31am
Sarahfran's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2000 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by luisa:
[b] BTW how about the autistic basketball player on the news? Pretty cool!
[/b]
Why does everyone think that was pretty cool? I tought it was pretty annoying and disgraceful. Here's this kid with enormous talent for basketball (very few people can hit three point shots like that!) and no one ever considered putting him in to play until the last game of his last year of school when they were all but certain of a win. Why? Because he's autistic. I thought--before I saw the interviews and video clips--that maybe the other team was just letting him have his moment and not defending, or that he wouldn't be able to interact with the other team members in a useful way or that the noise and chaos of the game would bother him. Nope. He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game. I think the coach shouldn't be advertising this event AT ALL--he should be hiding in his office, mortified that he never considered this kid as a serious player before because of his disability. And here's all these people congratulating themselves that they let this special ed kid have his moment in the sun and no one is saying "what about the other three and a half years?"
Think of it in terms of peanut allergy. Suppose the school system said that your child couldn't go on any field trips because it was too dangerous for them, no way to make it peanut-safe. So for 12 years your child stays in the library while the other kids go off on field trips. Then for the special senior trip the school makes an exception and decides that no peanut products will be allowed and they'll take precautions in public places. And guess what? It's easy! The student with the allergy has a great time and has no health problems and the other students don't really care that they can't have their Snickers bars. So the school advertises what great people they are that they made this accomodation one time for their disabled student. Would we be saying "that's pretty cool?" Or would we be saying "why didn't you do this the other 12 years?"
Sarah

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:39am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Sarahfran:
[b] Why does everyone think that was pretty cool? I tought it was pretty annoying and disgraceful. Here's this kid with enormous talent for basketball (very few people can hit three point shots like that!) and no one ever considered putting him in to play until the last game of his last year of school when they were all but certain of a win. Why? Because he's autistic. I thought--before I saw the interviews and video clips--that maybe the other team was just letting him have his moment and not defending, or that he wouldn't be able to interact with the other team members in a useful way or that the noise and chaos of the game would bother him. Nope. He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game. I think the coach shouldn't be advertising this event AT ALL--he should be hiding in his office, mortified that he never considered this kid as a serious player before because of his disability. And here's all these people congratulating themselves that they let this special ed kid have his moment in the sun and no one is saying "what about the other three and a half years?"
Think of it in terms of peanut allergy. Suppose the school system said that your child couldn't go on any field trips because it was too dangerous for them, no way to make it peanut-safe. So for 12 years your child stays in the library while the other kids go off on field trips. Then for the special senior trip the school makes an exception and decides that no peanut products will be allowed and they'll take precautions in public places. And guess what? It's easy! The student with the allergy has a great time and has no health problems and the other students don't really care that they can't have their Snickers bars. So the school advertises what great people they are that they made this accomodation one time for their disabled student. Would we be saying "that's pretty cool?" Or would we be saying "why didn't you do this the other 12 years?"
Sarah[/b]
thank you from my heart, Sarah. I cried when I saw that video. But probably not for the same reasons as some others.

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 12:50am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

[b]"He speaks and interacts with the other team members just fine and has done so for years, the opposing team was really playing basketball, and he loves and thrives on the noise and chaos of the game."[/b]
but would you consider him "slightly" autistic? I know people who people who are completely functional, maybe even excelling in the social and academic and professional realms who are [i]as autistic as all get out[/i]. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/biggrin.gif[/img]

Posted on: Sat, 03/18/2006 - 1:05am
momma2boys's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Jason McElwain, the basketball player you are speaking of, lives nearby. From what I understand on our local news, is this. He was considered too small to join the JV team, so he took on the role of team manager. He stayed in that role on the varsity team. He had a pregame ritual where he would practice his shots. Because he was always so dedicated to the team, the coach told him to suit up for the last game and he would get him in. So apparently it isn't that he was a player on the team that sat suited up day after day expecting to play. Now I don't know much about basketball, so I don't know if team managers normally play on the team as well or not.
So it wasn't that so much that I found offensive. The coach was quoted as being an 'emotional wreck' because he was so proud and excited.
What I found condescending is that he is described as 'highly functional autistic', yet everyone is so amazed that the kid can score in a basketball game. Just because he is autistic, you would assume the kid can't make a shot?
I don't know if anyone saw it, but a couple days ago President Bush was in the area and Jason was there to meet him. I thought he was kinda condescending to him too, talking to him like he was 3. Not that that surprises me!

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