The mom who wants her child to have PB is brought to tears...

Posted on: Wed, 03/24/2004 - 10:54pm
StaceyK's picture
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[url="http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2004/03/25/propo..."]http://www.boston.com/news/local/massach...viding_parents/[/url]

"My son doesn't have a choice because he doesn't eat if he doesn't have a peanut butter sandwich," said Elaine Rusharruda, who was brought to tears when discussing her 7-year-old's diet. "The guidelines go too far."
What is *she* crying about? Her kid isn't going to die if he doesn't have his PB&J. (Unlike a PA child who might get exposed to his PB&J). In fact, I'd argue his health is actually in danger if he eats nothing but PB&J morning, noon and night... which I doubt.

Posted on: Wed, 03/24/2004 - 11:49pm
jtolpin's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2003 - 09:00

This is just ridiculous... The poor kid who ONLY eats PB sandwiches...
Too bad the mom doesnt have any common sense, to TRY any other substitute sandwich...
Too bad he eats PB for breakfast, lunch AND dinner... I wonder if he eats pizza? Nah.. MUST be a PB sandwich or NOTHING...
sigh...
Jason

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 12:48am
momma2boys's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2003 - 09:00

Id like to bring that mother to tears myself! sorry [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 1:10am
e-mom's picture
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I back you on that momma2boys!!!

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 2:56am
food4thought's picture
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I hope you can understand that there are other burdens that parents face that are overwhelming, serious, life-altering.
The newspaper article only skims what was said at that meeting. The moms mentioned have more behind the tears than just wanting their kids to have food choices.
Most children would relent after a few weeks of new food in their lunchboxes. A small minority of children will persist choosing hunger over putting food in their mouths that doesn't feel right, taste right, smell right. Lunch monitors don't cajole, bribe, insist that students each their lunch at school the way a mom can at home.
My son threw out his lunch every day for more than 6 months. He was loosing weight, lethargic, depressed. With some underlying health conditions (sensory integration disorder, mood disorder, anxiety all being monitored by his physicians) expanding his food choices was a battle we were losing. Granola bars, peanut butter sandwiches with whole wheat breat were sure hits. Dozens of other ideas were tried (some suggested on this board!) with a few successes to mix in.
For working families, children are out of the house from 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and eat what's in the backpack or what is offered a school. That's a long time for a young child to go without.
Can going hungry 180 days a year kill you? Maybe not, but it can affect your attention in class, your ability to concentrate and learn, your self esteem. For some children, this is the beginning of a frightening downward spiral.
The mom who was crying may not be dealing with a life-threatening allergy, but she is crying out of a sincere concern for her son.
Newspaper reporters have little space to tell a story. They boil it down to a few soundbites that don't capture the unique details. I know this board provides support/information for parents living with peanut allergies, but others are reading these posts and seeking to understand.
Saying you want to make others cry, when you don't know the specifics of their burdens seems rather harsh. Parents who are most deeply affectd by food restrictions in the classoom do not want to endanger other children. They are just seeking compromise and understanding for their own children.

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 3:16am
MommaBear's picture
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Quote:Originally posted by food4thought:
[b]I hope you can understand that there are other burdens that parents face that are overwhelming, serious, life-altering.
The newspaper article only skims what was said at that meeting. The moms mentioned have more behind the tears than just wanting their kids to have food choices.
Most children would relent after a few weeks of new food in their lunchboxes. A small minority of children will persist choosing hunger over putting food in their mouths that doesn't feel right, taste right, smell right. Lunch monitors don't cajole, bribe, insist that students each their lunch at school the way a mom can at home.
My son threw out his lunch every day for more than 6 months. He was loosing weight, lethargic, depressed. With some underlying health conditions (sensory integration disorder, mood disorder, anxiety all being monitored by his physicians) expanding his food choices was a battle we were losing. Granola bars, peanut butter sandwiches with whole wheat breat were sure hits. Dozens of other ideas were tried (some suggested on this board!) with a few successes to mix in.
For working families, children are out of the house from 8 a.m. to 5:45 p.m. and eat what's in the backpack or what is offered a school. That's a long time for a young child to go without.
Can going hungry 180 days a year kill you? Maybe not, but it can affect your attention in class, your ability to concentrate and learn, your self esteem. For some children, this is the beginning of a frightening downward spiral.
The mom who was crying may not be dealing with a life-threatening allergy, but she is crying out of a sincere concern for her son.
Newspaper reporters have little space to tell a story. They boil it down to a few soundbites that don't capture the unique details. I know this board provides support/information for parents living with peanut allergies, but others are reading these posts and seeking to understand.
Saying you want to make others cry, when you don't know the specifics of their burdens seems rather harsh. Parents who are most deeply affectd by food restrictions in the classoom do not want to endanger other children. They are just seeking compromise and understanding for their own children. [/b]
food4thought,
I can't even begin to thank you. WRT only to my own cubs as I do not know *the particulars of the situation you describe*: I have two peanut allergic children. Both of who have a type of "autism" (personally, detesting labels to begin with). They are both a joy and a treasure.
I mean, *I do believe* there are many *special needs* children *out there*.
IHP's and 504's (for example) not being just for food allergies.
Although I do not know *the personal circumstances you describe* and do not know the particulars............I very well understand what you are saying. As a matter of fact, [i]I have been told *I have issues*, myself.[/i] [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/wink.gif[/img]
There are indeed things my cubs *have no say in*. ie: Some things are not *a choice*, although to others, it may seem they are. It's just *who* they are: A joy and a treasure. I find myself asking for just as much *mercy*, if not more, related to my children's "autism" than their *peanut allergy*, as [b]I see *mercy*, understanding, compassion, empathy, etc.................as being equally important and having just as an important effect in BOTH situations.[/b]
Maybe it's just me, but I hope not.
Again, thank you for shedding a ray of light.
[This message has been edited by MommaBear (edited March 25, 2004).]

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 10:33am
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Stacey K, do you live in Newton? Or, do you just run a nationwide search for articles on food allergy every day? It's really hard for me to go to these message boards that involve events that are actually happening in my community --about a policy that will affect my child's safety and inclusion in Massachusetts --only to find that the people commenting are in Illinois. Is there anyone viewing these articles on Newton, MA who actuallly has a personal interest in the outcome? Or, is it all just entertainment for you people?

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 10:45am
MommaBear's picture
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Joined: 09/23/2002 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by Jesse'sMom:
[b]Stacey K, do you live in Newton? Or, do you just run a nationwide search for articles on food allergy every day? It's really hard for me to go to these message boards that involve events that are actually happening in my community --about a policy that will affect my child's safety and inclusion in Massachusetts --only to find that the people commenting are in Illinois. Is there anyone viewing these articles on Newton, MA who actuallly has a personal interest in the outcome? Or, is it all just entertainment for you people?[/b]
in another thread you mentioned:
[i]"The peanut butter is going to be hitting the fan in Newton. But, if the right people work together, we could be a model for the county."[/i]
I take it that would include Illinois.
Is everyone commenting from Illinois?
Is food4thought from Illinois, or somewhere closer?
I am the parent of two peanut allergic children who also happen to have [i]some other special needs[/i].

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 11:11am
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

Unfortunately, you don't pay taxes in my community or are registered to vote here, so your opinion on the ridiculous peanut butter people is kind and supportive, but of no functional use. Unfortunately, people in Illiniois can't help me with my immediate goal of getting a ground-breaking food allergy policy passed in my city's school system in Massachusetts. However, once my city passes progressive policies that make public schools safer and more inclusive for children with peanut and other life-threatening allergies, others in Massachusetts and adjoining states will follow. Parents of LTA children in Illinois can use their success to promote similar guidelines/policies anywhere in the country. For now, however, I'm looking for people who can vote in my city and had hoped to find some here.

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 11:57am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Food4Thought,
Thank you for your thoughtful post. You are right, there are many people out there with other issues as well. And we know all too well how reporters have a way of whittling down a quote to make it "quotable", and in the process completely obscure the original meaning.
However please understand where some of our hostility is coming from. Most of the opposition we face does not come from people with legitimate issues of their own, but from people who do not want to be inconvenienced, or have their "rights" trampled on. Some of the best support our members have received has been from people who's children had issues that could have placed them at odds with ours, but instead saw themselves as allies - parents who also understand what it's like to need accomodations and face opposition.
Amy

Posted on: Thu, 03/25/2004 - 12:13pm
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foodforthought, call me harsh. When you have to fear for your childs life every day, because someones kid [i]has[/i] to have p.b., we'll talk. When your heart stops everytime you hear ambulance sirens, and you sit waiting for the phone to ring and the school to tell you that ambulance was for your child, we'll talk.
I have 2 very picky eaters. Add in all the foods my p.a. son can't have, and try to make [i]him[/i] a lunch! So while I'm sorry all your kid will eat is p.b., my kid could [b]die[/b] if he doesn't wash his hands or the table good enough after he eats it. If you can honestly tell me that sandwich is worth more than my childs life, go for it!

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