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Posted on: Tue, 02/13/2007 - 12:58am
BriandBrinasmom's picture
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Joined: 10/20/2006 - 09:00

I do not remember the details on this because my daughter is almost eight now, but I do know our pediatric allergist skin tested her between the ages of 1 and 2 for milk allergy. It runs in our family (my son is 3rd generation), so it was good to rule out.
I believe she was also tested for peanut around 3 or 4. We had no reason to think she was allergic and she's not.
We've gotten a lot more relaxed about her in general because she does not appear to have any food allergies, but I did have a moment of anxiety at a party the other night when she ate a shrimp. This is a kid who generally doesn't eat anything unless it's white in color, so I was totally surprised she tried one! No problem.
Regarding Epi-Pens...interestingly enough, they are formulated on the basis of body *surface area*, not weight. The weight guidelines just approximate this surface area. My son is very tiny weight-wise, so we had whole conversations on this topic with the pediatric allergist and he said there isn't a huge difference between an Epi and an Epi Jr. He prescribed an adult Epi for my son, even though he wasn't over the weight recommendation because he was tall enough for it.
And no, a doctor is not going to give you an Epi-Pen unless there's evidence of a clinical allergy. Epi-Pens can cause heart arrythymias (and death in rare cases), so there is some potential liability in prescribing them without a reason.
Sadly, I read a case history once where the person was having a panic attack, treated themselves with multiple Epi-Pens (which obviously didn't help the panic at all), and ended up dying from the epinephrine.

Posted on: Tue, 02/13/2007 - 3:17am
Heather2's picture
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Joined: 09/25/2001 - 09:00

My younger DS has RAST tested negative twice for pb. The doctor says go ahead and feed him pb but I haven't had the courage yet. He is in a peanut/tree nut free preschool so I haven't really worried about it. Since he was going to enter a non peanut free school this fall, I was planning on feeding him pb this spring, at my mother's house because she's right up the street from the hospital, on a weekday while older DS is at school. I wound up putting DS in another year of preschool so I'm debating if I should bother this year or push it off another year. Since I have my younger DS with me a lot when my older DS is in school, I allow younger DS to eat "may contains" when his brother isn't around. Funny about your dream, Becca, I had a dream last night that I finally got up the courage to feed my younger DS pb and I realized I had lost my purse with the EpiPen in it.

Posted on: Tue, 02/13/2007 - 5:05am
amy2's picture
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Joined: 09/02/2000 - 09:00

my son is the oldest, and when my daughter turned 4 I had her tested be4 putting her in preschool. unfortunately, she tested positive to both blood and skin. I really thought for sure she would not have it. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/frown.gif[/img] She too has never had any exposure, but with both tests coming up positive, that's all I need to see. She also tested high like my son. I don't put my test numbers because everyone's are always so different. They both tested in severe category.

Posted on: Tue, 02/13/2007 - 5:43am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

I am in the same boat, I have 2 younger siblings but we went ahead and skin/blood tested them for peanuts, so far both are negative. I think if it continues, I will have a food challenge before they enter Kindergarten. They have both been exposed)(through breatsfeeding, I still ate pb), so I don't think it's a false negative...I'm just not ready and would never test them myself at home anyways(nor would they even be eating it, but would like to know for school). The same pair have positive skin/blood to eggs but I've never seen a reaction in either of them....we'll address that in a few years as well. Age 5 is a good goal.
But, like others suggested, if you are worried, do some further testing with the allergist and a possible food challenge right before entering school.
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)

Posted on: Sun, 02/25/2007 - 1:58am
NoPeanutsPlease.com's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2007 - 09:00

We have a 23 month old who is severely peanut & egg allergic. We also have a three month old baby. We are limiting exposure to main allergens with our second child (as we did our first) and are hopeful she does not also develop allergies. When is the earliest we can have a useful skin test done ... I read 18mos somewhere ... is that correct? NP.
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[url=http://www.NoPeanutsPlease.com
It]www.NoPeanutsPlease.com
It[/url] Takes A Village ...

Posted on: Sun, 02/25/2007 - 2:04am
chanda4's picture
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Joined: 12/14/2006 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by NoPeanutsPlease.com:
[b]We have a 23 month old who is severely peanut & egg allergic. We also have a three month old baby. We are limiting exposure to main allergens with our second child (as we did our first) and are hopeful she does not also develop allergies. When is the earliest we can have a useful skin test done ... I read 18mos somewhere ... is that correct? NP.
[/b]
I'm not positive, but we did get my daughter blood tested at 6 weeks. She reacted to milk and just wanted it confirmed before cutting everything out of our diet(plus it's good to have a confirmed positive on record, I know some will argue the importance of testing...I test). They did skin test her as well, just this winter, so right before age 1. That's when egg showed up, we also did blood work again to get the numbers of the egg and again the milk.
Under age 3 their immune system is still developing, so you may or may not get correct results, but if it is positive, it's usually a low number. At age 3 it all peeks and the numbers become very high, but their immune system is fully developed so you can start checking for environmental and seasonal then as well. After age 3, their test results tend to come back down a bit(level out so to say)....(this is how it was explained to me by the allergist, so of course I could be wrong).
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Chanda(mother of 4)
Sidney-8 (beef and chocolate, grasses, molds, weeds, guinea pig & asthma)
Jake-6 (peanut, all tree nuts, eggs, trees, grasses, weeds, molds, cats, dogs, guinea pig & eczema & asthma)
Carson-3 1/2 (milk, soy, egg, beef and pork, cats, dog, guinea pig and EE)
Savannah-1 (milk and egg)
[This message has been edited by chanda4 (edited February 25, 2007).]

Posted on: Sun, 02/25/2007 - 1:12pm
NoPeanutsPlease.com's picture
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Joined: 02/22/2007 - 09:00

Thanks ... that is consistent with what I read. I'll probably bring our youngest in to see the allergist once we start introducing solid food, with the understanding that things could change. Our oldest displayed egg allergy at 8 months and had a slight swelling reaction after eating a muffin that had a stray nut in it at 15 months. So there is no need to wait until three =) NP.
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[url="http://www.NoPeanutsPlease.com"]www.NoPeanutsPlease.com[/url]

Posted on: Sun, 02/25/2007 - 2:07pm
SkyMom's picture
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Joined: 10/27/2001 - 09:00

Hi. I just wanted to add that my dd's allergist tested her at one year. I have also talked to many other pa parents who tested at similiar and even younger ages. Unfortunately, her rast level is as high now as it was when she was one. This is almost eight years now since her first test.

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