testing?

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 12:37pm
Love my babies's picture
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Joined: 03/18/2005 - 09:00

I don't chime in much, but check in every day to see what the topics are and I have a question. I notice many of you have allergist and retest your children often. Do you have a specific reason, or are you hoping for a change? My dd tested 5 on the RAST last year and I figure that's it she is allergic forever, why retest. Should I retest? I hate to put her through the blood test, she gets so upset, is it worth it? Plus I just go through her regular dr., should I get an allergist? She has no other allergies expect peanut.

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 1:50pm
Sirimon's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2006 - 09:00

In general, about 20% of kids with peanut allergy can outgrow it, especially if their RAST IgE were less than 5. The RAST measures the antibody to peanuts (IgE), the result can be from 0 to >100, with > 0.35 being positive. This translates to class 0-6 (or 5 in some labs). Keeping in mind that class 5 can have IgE from lower to higher end. Kinda like if your number exceeds certain point it becomes class 5, although there is a wide range within class 5 itself. You should find out what level was your daughter's. Re-testing will help, especially if her level gets low enough, the doctor may give her an oral challenge.
My daughter have had them check yearly, to see where it's heading. So far she is still high and if this year she's still high, we may skip a year.
I definitely think getting an allergist is a good idea.

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 3:10pm
hopechapel's picture
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Joined: 12/11/2005 - 09:00

Not sure about testing -- you could do it every 2 years. If you can I would go through an allergist. In my experience, even top notch peds are a little lagging behind the allergists in knowledge. I think it pays to go straight for the specialist. the peds will discourage you -- but just find a good allergist. Also, if peanuts is her only allergy that may put her in a more hopeful category for outgrowing it. I read some study that said your chances of outgrowing were less if you had multiple FA's.

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 5:04am
Love my babies's picture
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Joined: 03/18/2005 - 09:00

I spoke to my ped. yesterday. I just moved to this area and she is new to our family, so we aren't quit sure about her yet. Anyway, she said I don't need an allergist and I don't need to retest her at any time. Then her "suggestion" to me was "just don't let her eat peanut". RED FLAG!!! She just doesn't seem to get it. I will look for an allergist and a new ped. My last dr. was very aware of our situation, and every time she had a reaction she would retest her to check her levels, which always went up. So if she doesn't have any reaction should I just plan to retest every year?

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 9:23pm
KaitlinsMom's picture
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Joined: 09/25/2005 - 09:00

My PA daughter was diagnosed with her allergy right before her second birthday. After seeing her pediatric Doc. He reffered us to an allergist. Our pediatric doc told us to stay away from peanuts until the allergist tested her. After seeing the allergist and finding out she was allergic to peanuts, I realized that staying away from peanuts wasnt the half of it... Our allergist provided us with so much more info explained to us about may contains which I hadnt even thought about at that point.. He also gave us a perscription for an Epi-pen along with a training video on how to use it and a packet of info on food allergies. So I definatley recomend seeing an allergist.
As far as retesting, Our allergist wants to retest her when she is four. Before she starts Kindergarden. When I ask about the possibility of her out growing the allergy He pretty much told me not to get my hopes up. That the best thing for us to focus on was learning to live with the allergy. Even though I know it is a small chance in the back of my mind I still have hope and am anxious to have her retested to see if there has been a change. Being tested isnt a pleasent experience but knowing what you are dealing with is half the battle right.

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 11:20pm
Lindajo's picture
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Joined: 10/14/2003 - 09:00

I retest my DD every couple of years to check her levels. I would like to know if they have increased or decreased. I hadn't tested my DD since she was 5 (she's now 10) and I heard that if they were reaction-free for over 5 years, their levels could decrease. Well, her's increased. Even higher than before. But, they said she is no longer allergic to tree nuts. I still don't give them to her directly tho, just in case.

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 11:25pm
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

We see an allergist yearly more for the management of asthma and seasonal allergies than anything else.
After his initial testing, we didn't retest my son for about 6 years - our allergist felt that there was no point in testing unless he went two solid years without a reaction. We finally achieved that and had him retested last spring, only to find out that all his numbers increased.
I definitely think that initial testing and diagnosis should be made by an allergist. After that, I don't really see the point in yearly testing in every case. I guess it's pretty individual.
Amy

Posted on: Sat, 02/11/2006 - 11:28pm
Naer74's picture
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Joined: 11/03/2003 - 09:00

My son had several small reactions to peanuts (guess they really weren't small but compared to his later ones they were). He never actually ingested peanuts because he would always either refuse the item or spit it out immediately. Then at around the age of 3 he reacted to cashews. Our ped. basically said the same as yours, "Keep them away from nuts." About an hour later she called me back, said that she wanted to refer us to an allergist, and called in a prescription for an Epi. It would have taken us months to get into the allergist but a close friend of mine (daughter allergic to milk) called the allergist and allowed my son to take her daughters spot. That was 6 years ago. He had a skin test that year, another one the next year that he reacted to, and then the blood test the following year (four years ago). The CAP RAST came back negative. Son refused to go through a food challenge out of fear. I can understand that. He told me he never wanted to eat nuts, even if it showed negative. I kindly explained to him that if he didn't want to eat nuts that was fine but if he outgrew his allergy he could eat m&m's and other candies, cookies, or items that were labeled "may contain" or "made in the same facility". He agreed to this. Unfortunately, he reacted immediately to the food challenge. He had another reaction a few months after that which was pretty severe. He has not been tested since that time four years ago. My dh and I just don't see the reason why we should have him tested each year. I think in my mind we have just come to the conclusion that he will always have this allergy. He will be 10 in two months. I think, from reading the board, that many parents have their kids tested yearly when their kids are young. However, when they pass that 5 yr old age then you kinda just know they won't outgrow it. I am thinking about having him CAP RASTED again when he turns 10...more out of curiousity. By the way, he is also allergic to tree nuts.

Posted on: Tue, 02/14/2006 - 11:48am
hopechapel's picture
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Joined: 12/11/2005 - 09:00

the pediatricians and the allergists and the OBGyn's should all have a talk with each other.
DEFINITELY see an allergist. My child broke out in strange red spots. I took him in to the ped who told me it was either a reaction to a food or viral. When I asked about seeing an allergist because I wanted to figure out if there were environmental and pollen issues triggering his asthma she was dismissive. Why would you do that? You can't treat a toddler. Next ped, same thing. He went as far as to tell me that it would be stupid. Meanwhile he told me to slather any kind of vegetable oil on my kids asthma. (He did not say to avoid peanut oil). They don't want to share your business, they don't want to have their prescriptions interfered with -- I'm not sure why. And they do not really know enough about food allergy. I mean HELLO --we flew Continental to Hawaii with our son pre-diagnosis and by the time we landed he was beet red with rash. Must have been all those honey peanuts Continental serves. He did not eat them but I did and was nursing and they were all over our trays, etc. So the moral of this story is -- had I known his food allergies would I not have been better off? Even if you can't treat it? Also, it may be nice to have the full picture even if you are avoiding nuts altogether. My son got into a big bag of almonds. Mouth full. He did not react. Called my ped who now had a copy of RAST test and reaffirmed that he did not test allergic to almonds. It is good to have the information. I say again -- find a good specialist. Go to the peds for the ordinary stuff.

Posted on: Wed, 02/08/2006 - 1:50pm
Sirimon's picture
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Joined: 02/01/2006 - 09:00

In general, about 20% of kids with peanut allergy can outgrow it, especially if their RAST IgE were less than 5. The RAST measures the antibody to peanuts (IgE), the result can be from 0 to >100, with > 0.35 being positive. This translates to class 0-6 (or 5 in some labs). Keeping in mind that class 5 can have IgE from lower to higher end. Kinda like if your number exceeds certain point it becomes class 5, although there is a wide range within class 5 itself. You should find out what level was your daughter's. Re-testing will help, especially if her level gets low enough, the doctor may give her an oral challenge.
My daughter have had them check yearly, to see where it's heading. So far she is still high and if this year she's still high, we may skip a year.
I definitely think getting an allergist is a good idea.

Posted on: Fri, 02/10/2006 - 3:10pm
hopechapel's picture
Offline
Joined: 12/11/2005 - 09:00

Not sure about testing -- you could do it every 2 years. If you can I would go through an allergist. In my experience, even top notch peds are a little lagging behind the allergists in knowledge. I think it pays to go straight for the specialist. the peds will discourage you -- but just find a good allergist. Also, if peanuts is her only allergy that may put her in a more hopeful category for outgrowing it. I read some study that said your chances of outgrowing were less if you had multiple FA's.

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