test of the epi-pen

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Our son's octor wants our son, 15, to give himself an injection (in the Doctor office unde rhis observation) to help him understand not be afraid of the injection and the results. The Dr wants to ensure that any signs of a reaction that require an injection are not delayed due to a fear of the injection procerss.

Has anyone else had a Dr recommend this?

On Nov 12, 2004

I have never heard this and it sounds strange to me. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/confused.gif[/img]

Is the allergist recommending this for all of his adolescent patients, or is your son having a particular fear of the epipen?

My first thought is that I would not want to expose my child to epinephren unnecessarily. However, only you know if this seems like something that would make sense for your son.

Good luck!

[img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img] Miriam

On Nov 12, 2004

Quote:

Our son's octor wants our son, 15, to give himself an injection (in the Doctor office unde rhis observation) to help him understand not be afraid of the injection and the results. The Dr wants to ensure that any signs of a reaction that require an injection are not delayed due to a fear of the injection procerss. Has anyone else had a Dr recommend this?

Sounds dangerous to me but im not a medical proffesional........

------------------ webmaster of [url="http://www.goingnuts.cjb.net"]www.goingnuts.cjb.net[/url] *****ALLERGY PATROL*****

On Nov 12, 2004

I think epinephrine is only dangerous to someone that has a pre-existing heart condition. One shot of it should not cause any problems. (Verify this with your doctor if you are considering allowing him to do a *test run* with a real epi-pen.)

Does your son have a fear of needles? Or has he expressed a fear of what the epinephrine would do to him? Would using an epi-trainer be sufficient?

I've also never heard of this, and I'm not sure I'd agree to it with my son. But, I agree with Miriam - you know your son best.

**********

If you decide to let him do this, I'd suggest you do it on a Friday. Epi makes you very *high energy*, and he won't be going back to school that day - possibly not the next either.

You know what! The more I think about this, it does sound logical. Doing it in the doctor's office, under supervision. It has merits for a teen with life-threatening allergies.

Please let us know what you decide to do.

On Nov 12, 2004

Maybe they can do it without the actual medication (using a placebo). I don't think it would be beneficial for him to have unnecessary medication.

Take care, Naturemom

On Nov 13, 2004

Naturemom, I do like your suggestion, but where would you get an auto-injector with a placebo?

And I'm wondering about something else. This post is really sticking in my mind. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

3nicks, do you know the reason(s) your doctor wants to do this? Maybe he wants your son to absolutely understand that when in doubt use it. To often people delay using it, and that can be fatal. By having him use it [i]when it's not needed[/i] that really enforces the thought that "when in doubt - use it" don't just wait and see.

Does that make sense? Isn't it believed that the teen years are the most dangerous with these allergies?

***********

I don't want to sound like I'm telling people to do this. More like I'm *thinking out loud*. And, the specific person we are talking about - it's a doctor's suggestion.

On Nov 15, 2004

First - thank you all for your feedback.

The reason the Dr. made the request was to prevent any concern my teenage son might have in giving himself a shot. He is not afraid of needles.T

The issue was on being really able to do the self injection!

The Dr's comment was when there is a situation where the epi-pen is the right thing to-do he did not want my son not to do it because of the fear of the "unknown" that is a) will it hurt? b) how will I feel after etc.

I am planning to have my son do - he seems "ok" with it.

When we do it - I will let you all know how it goes!

On Nov 15, 2004

Thanks for the update. [img]http://uumor.pair.com/nutalle2/peanutallergy/smile.gif[/img]

On Nov 15, 2004

Quote:

Originally posted by 3nicks: [b]Our son's octor wants our son, 15, to give himself an injection (in the Doctor office unde rhis observation) to help him understand not be afraid of the injection and the results. The Dr wants to ensure that any signs of a reaction that require an injection are not delayed due to a fear of the injection procerss.

Has anyone else had a Dr recommend this?[/b]

I see a huge potential problem with this -- the shot hurts! And there can be side effects from the medication, which include heart racing & chills. So having your child practice with a real needle may make him **more** afraid rather than less afraid. He may delay the medication because he wants to be really sure before experiencing the needle & side effects & he might delay too long.

On Nov 16, 2004

Quote:

I see a huge potential problem with this -- the shot hurts! And there can be side effects from the medication, which include heart racing & chills. So having your child practice with a real needle may make him **more** afraid rather than less afraid. He may delay the medication because he wants to be really sure before experiencing the needle & side effects & he might delay too long.

I would agree.

------------------ webmaster of [url="http://www.goingnuts.cjb.net"]www.goingnuts.cjb.net[/url] *****ALLERGY PATROL*****

On Nov 16, 2004

I agree with those that say this is a bad idea... unless the doc has some underlying purpose not disclosed...

I wouldnt want anyone to give themselves a shot of anything, unless necessary...

Seems like a bad idea.

JMHO Jason

------------------ [b]* ENRICHED * [/b]

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