Teen did not die from peanut kiss: Coroner

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 2:20am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

This was just released - it's on the Toronto Star's website:

Teen did not die from peanut kiss: Coroner
Mar. 3, 2006. 11:34 AM

SAGUENAY, Que. (CP)

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 3:07am
anonymous's picture
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

So what DID she die from?!? This is the one story that when I tell people, they seem to get the severity of this allergy....I'm floored.
------------------
mom to Ari(5) - severe nut allergies, asthma, you name it - and Maya (8), mild excema

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 3:12am
anonymous's picture
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Allergic Living magazine has a story about the investigation into her death in the upcoming March issue. The focus of the article is on how difficult it is to pinpoint anaphylaxis as a cause of death - death is often attributed to other causes instead. We won't know why the coroner is so sure it's not the PB sandwich until he releases his final report - I'll be sure to follow-up post the minute I hear it's been released.

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 4:03am
SallyL's picture
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Joined: 02/20/2006 - 09:00

I'll be interested in hearing what the final results are.
I hope if they declare that it wasn't from the kiss that it isn't too widely publicized. I'm all for the truth about things, but once some people hear this (and we all know someone who falls into this category) it will just help further their disbelief that trace amounts of peanuts can be deadly.
Do let us know what you find out though!

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 4:05am
SallyL's picture
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Although I do have to add that if it wasn't from the kiss, I will be happy for her boyfriend. How devestating it must have been to be the 'cause' of her death!

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 4:33am
Anonymous's picture
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Sally, that was my very first thought. About her boyfriend.
Cayley's mom, thanks for posting.

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 4:56am
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Joined: 11/08/2000 - 09:00

The French article goes a bit further. The coroner defines anaphylactic shock as :
"Un choc anaphylactique se traduit par deux r

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 5:11am
becca's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Hmmm. I wonder if it is just coming down to a matter of semantics? I hope we hear the cause he sites. I also thought how reassuring for her bf, if it were the case it was something else. But was it, or is he splitting hairs on the definition of anaphylaxis? becca

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 5:38am
Corvallis Mom's picture
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Joined: 05/22/2001 - 09:00

Darthcleo, thank you very much.
Please correct me if my bilingual decoding skills are not up to par here, but his explanation seems to me to leave a severe asthmatic mechanism as a possibility, oui?
It sounds like he is stating that the "usual" route of anaphylaxis death is either laryngeodema causing respiratory arrest or sudden a BP drop causing cardiac arrest. I don't think asthma would fit either one. And asthma is what the first-hand reports claim Christina thought at the time-- one of her friends reported her digging for an inhaler, if memory serves.
What perplexes me is how he seems to be so certain that her death wasn't peanut induced. It will be interesting to see what the explanation is.
But I will just mention this: I recall specifically reading in two separate research articles that beta-tryptase levels are often NOT ELEVATED in peanut anaphylaxis fatalities. Even when it is very clear what the cause of death was and they get a blood sample at TOD. So if that is his reasoning, the experts will be debunking THAT in a hurry.
But this is just speculation on my part. That would explain why he seems so convinced that her death was not anaphylaxis, however.
More on that:
This article is regarding Jack-Jumper fatalities,
[url="http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/175_12_171201/brown/brown.html"]http://www.mja.com.au/public/issues/175_12_171201/brown/brown.html[/url]
from this same article, please note that:
[i]"Serum mast-cell tryptase level was markedly raised in Patient 4, but only marginally raised in the other two patients tested. The reference range for the technique used in 1995 was < 2

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 6:15am
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Joined: 10/28/2005 - 09:00

I also thought it was interesting that numerous earlier reports said that she had died even though she was given emergency epinephrine immediately. His report says that it was not administered properly if at all.

Posted on: Fri, 03/03/2006 - 6:45am
TNAmom's picture
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Joined: 11/29/2005 - 09:00

I'm thinking the toxicology report was suspicious. Partying with her friends, she might have taken something that night...

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