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Posted on: Tue, 04/27/2004 - 12:47am
LilMansMom's picture
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Joined: 03/14/2002 - 09:00

Amy, Thanks for noticing!! It gave me the warm fuzzies to know I was missed.
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Little Man's Momma
a*k*a Kendra

Posted on: Wed, 04/28/2004 - 11:59am
PeteFerraro's picture
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Joined: 07/10/2001 - 09:00

In an effort to salvage something positive out of this thread I created a DRAFT food allergy policy that I am going to propose my son's soccer club adopt.
Here is a [b]DRAFT[/b]:
[url="http://www.ferrarofamily.org/soccer-fa-policy.html"]Draft Food Allergy Policy[/url]
One I get comfortable with it I plan on submitting it for club approval.
I encourage comments and plagiarism. :-)
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Pete Ferraro
[url="http://www.FerraroFamily.org"]http://www.FerraroFamily.org[/url]

Posted on: Wed, 04/28/2004 - 9:29pm
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Joined: 05/28/2009 - 16:42

I think this is a very good type of document to circulate for an activity such as this one--assuming that it is a community-based program. (Also assuming that school sports would be covered under the 504.)
Stating that anaphylaxis can be deadly right away is a plus, since many people still don't equate a peanut allergy with a deadly reaction. (Bees, yes; peanuts, no.). IMO.
My comment would be would anyone really take it seriously as a policy to be "enforced"--or is it merely another paper trail. Many of the good things you have listed are great common sense things that many of us already do. IMO, "telling" people about the policy may not produce the desired effect. Just, "Oh, yes...that boy has to avoid peanuts, but that doesn't affect me or my child."
Two of the most problematic areas that produce the most problems for us are plenty of peanut items in the concession stands (wrappers not thrown away, kids with peanut stuff (both players and siblings) walking right next to Ryan, etc.) and watching for cross-contamination issues (for ex., a sibling offering peanut crackers to a player, then going back out to play).
So what I'm saying is that this is a great draft document to try to get people to be more aware of peanut allergies and anaphylaxis, but is it enforceable, who would enforce it, and would enforcing it cause "bad" feelings in general if someone started poking fingers at someone not following policy. I know I'm being kind of nitpicky here, but unsure of how you were headed with this type of thing--a general info deal for the masses, or more of an enforceable type of policy.
Just noting that it seems to be "unofficial" policy for soccer in our area, that all half-time snacks are fruit--grapes, oranges, etc.
What people bring after the game doesn't phase me a bit, peanuts or no peanuts because we're out of there and he picks his own special snack anyway beforehand.

Posted on: Thu, 04/29/2004 - 12:24pm
PeteFerraro's picture
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Joined: 07/10/2001 - 09:00

Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]I think this is a very good type of document to circulate for an activity such as this one--assuming that it is a community-based program.[/b]
Thank you! You are correct, it is a community based program.
Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]My comment would be would anyone really take it seriously as a policy to be "enforced"--or is it merely another paper trail. Many of the good things you have listed are great common sense things that many of us already do.[/b]
We have a very strong club. Almost 700 kids. The program is very well run. Most of the responsibility falls on parents. Parents and the club administrators would be responsible for enforcement. Granted many of the things are common sense, but not all parents are as in tune with PA as PA.com parents.
Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]Two of the most problematic areas that produce the most problems for us are plenty of peanut items in the concession stands (wrappers not thrown away, kids with peanut stuff (both players and siblings) walking right next to Ryan, etc.) and watching for cross-contamination issues (for ex., a sibling offering peanut crackers to a player, then going back out to play).
[/b]
I agree, but we have to start somewhere. Rome wasn't built in a day.
Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]So what I'm saying is that this is a great draft document to try to get people to be more aware of peanut allergies and anaphylaxis, but is it enforceable, who would enforce it, and would enforcing it cause "bad" feelings in general if someone started poking fingers at someone not following policy.[/b]
Anything that increases awareness is a plus. Enforeceable? Absolutely not. If a parent wants to be a butt-hole, that is their right. Bad feelings? Hopefully not. I think the policy is fairly benign to not PA parents. On point I do want to make is the part about PA Parents needing to submit complaints in writing. I wanted to force PA parents to cool off and compose their thoughts. Again, my thought was, it's better than what we have (nothing).
Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]I know I'm being kind of nitpicky here, but unsure of how you were headed with this type of thing--a general info deal for the masses, or more of an enforceable type of policy.[/b]
Increased awareness, and having the club prepared if a reaction did occur. Our club has had issues with other food allergies (red dye) and they were caught un-prepared.
Quote:Originally posted by ryan's mom:
[b]Just noting that it seems to be "unofficial" policy for soccer in our area, that all half-time snacks are fruit--grapes, oranges, etc.
What people bring after the game doesn't phase me a bit, peanuts or no peanuts because we're out of there and he picks his own special snack anyway beforehand. [/b]
Ditto, same here.
Thanks for your comments.
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Pete Ferraro
[url="http://www.FerraroFamily.org"]http://www.FerraroFamily.org[/url]

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