son just had a reaction

Posted on: Sat, 10/16/2004 - 5:49am
tsowka72's picture
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Joined: 10/16/2004 - 09:00

i fed my 13 month old son his first bp sandwhich yesterday...within minutes his face and neck swelled and he had hives on his wrists and face. we took him to the emergency room right away. they gave him some kind of oral steroid and benedryl. his face started to clear up somewhat before they administered the oral steroid so they did not give him an injection. the doctor didnt seem to be too concerned just sent us on our way after observing him for about an hour an half. he gave me a prescription for prednisone to take for the next two days. i did not know peanuts were so dangerous i am very ignorant with this. but reading more iam scared. will he have a worse reaction next time? iam going to make an appointment with an allergist monday morning. any info would be appreciated. thank you. concerned mom!

Posted on: Sat, 10/16/2004 - 6:25am
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Joined: 02/23/2004 - 09:00

I am truly sorry to hear about your son's allergy. You are doing the right thing by seeing an allergist right away to determine the extent of his allergies. It sounds like he is allergic to peanuts based on the reaction so I would suggest you get a medic alert bracelet or necklace for him so that if another reaction happens and you are not with him others will know about the allergy. My son was 18 months when we found out about his allergy to peanuts. Upon going to the allergist we discovered that he is also allergic to all tree nuts, seafood, shellfish, soy and sesame. We now carry the epi-pen jr everywhere we go too. My best advice to you is to listen carefully to the allergist, read ALL food labels before you buy anything. Even if you have bought it before with no incident, food manufacturers are constantly changing processing plants and operations. The big issue here is the risk of cross contamination. Your allergist will prescribe an epi pen jr if the allergy to peanuts exists. Try not to get too worked up. I know it is a hard thing to do but you have to keep a clear head. There is a wonderful book available through this site called "Caring for your Child with Severe Food Allergies", by Lisa Cipriano Collins. Another great source of information is the book The Peanut Allergy Answer Book, by Micheal Young, MD. The key to food allergies is education. It is possible to keep your son safe in a nut obsessed world. We have kept our son reaction free since his first one and he is now almost 5. PeanutAllergy.com is a great place for you to get much needed support but it can also be very overwhelming if you are new here (even if you're not new). Dont overload yourself with too much information all at once. It can be very scary. Try to find a food allergy support group in your area. Call around to local hospitals and see if they have a contact to group near by. I really am sorry that you have to go through this...I hope this bit of info helps you out a bit. Good luck at the allergist and stay strong!!

Posted on: Sat, 10/16/2004 - 7:52am
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Welcome Tsowka72!
I'm glad you found us, but sorry you had to.
Nutless in NJ gave you great advice - there's not much to add. If the allergist doesn't give you an epi prescription, be sure to ask for one. It's something you should have with you at all times.
There's no way of knowing whether or not your child's next reaction will be worse, so it's just best to be prepared. Hopefully you'll never find out.
There's lot of great information on here, but it can be a bit overwhelming too. Take breaks when you need to, and never be afraid to ask questions. Someone will always be happy to answer.
Take care, and try not to stress too much.
Amy

Posted on: Sun, 10/17/2004 - 6:33am
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Joined: 05/09/2001 - 09:00

Hi there, you have my sympathy, I also found out about my son's PA at about 18 months of age.
You are doing the right thing in going to an allergist but I have something to add.
The Hospital did not do well by you, you never should have been sent home without an epi-pen, ever! It is possible to have an anaphylactic reaction to trace amounts of peanut. It is really important to read all labels and to call manufacturers to check on the safety of foods. Avoid all foods from a bakery, there are just to many risks involved. Restaurants are also risky, make sure to ask questions before allowing your child to eat.
Call your family doctor and get an epi-pen ASAP.
Just thought I would share what our allergist told us about peanut allergy. Having a mild peanut allergy is like being a little bit pregnant...you either have it or you don't!
Good luck,
Katiee

Posted on: Sun, 10/17/2004 - 4:08pm
tsowka72's picture
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Joined: 10/16/2004 - 09:00

Thank you everyone for your support and answers to my questions. I called about the epi pen and my answer was until I get a confirmed peanut allergy from a allergist they would not give me an epi pen. I hope to see one soon because this waiting is making me a nervous wreck. I keep having these visions of my sons throat closing and me not knowing what to do! I dont quite understand are there different severities to the allergy? Do they out-grow it? Thank you again for all your info and support. I hope to get some more answers soon. Teri

Posted on: Sun, 10/17/2004 - 10:05pm
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Hi Teri,
Yes, there can be different severities, [b]but[/b], it can also be extremely unpredictable, and someone who has had only mild reactions in the past can suddenly have a real whopper. That's why, as Katiee said, it's like being pregnant - you either have it or you don't. It should always be treated as if it is severe.
I hope the allergist can see you quickly; you shouldn't be without an epipen. In the meantime, steer clear of scooped ice creams, most Asian food and bakery goods. Check ingredient labels for "may contain" and "traces of".
Above all, try not to make yourself nuts (no pun intended) - it's all too easy to work yourself into a frenzy.
Keep us posted.
Amy

Posted on: Mon, 10/18/2004 - 1:32am
NutlessinNJ's picture
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Joined: 02/23/2004 - 09:00

Hello again Teri
I have to agree with everyone...you really should have an epi-pen. When my son had his reaction to peanut butter, the hospital was rather noncommital too but when I called my pediatrician and explained what had happened they issued us an epi-pen immediately. It may be worth another call to the pediatrician, (make sure you speak to him/her directly, not the assistant or receptionist). Explain what happened before and during the reaction, and what helped to releive the symptoms. I cant beleive that any pediatrician would not perscribe the Epi-pen based on just what you have told us on this site. I'm no doctor but I am a mother of a severely peanut, treenut, seafood, shellfish, soy and sesame allerrgic child and knowing what I saw happened to my son and what could happen again,(even worse than the first time) I would be insistent upon getting the epi-pen. Did you tell the allergist that you had a reaction and that the Pediatrician wont give you a perscription? Maybe the allergist will!! Its worth a shot!! (no pun intended!!)
I also was remiss in not mentioning to stay away from bakeries and ice cream parlors!! Thankfully others were on the ball. Good luck and keep us posted!!
Julie

Posted on: Mon, 10/18/2004 - 1:49am
NutlessinNJ's picture
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Joined: 02/23/2004 - 09:00

Hi, me again....
In regards to people outgrowing a peanut allergy, dont count on it. Some food allergies can be outgrown but unfortunately peanut and nut allergies are not outgrown. Now let me also say that there have been very RARE occasions (also known as miracles...) that someone has outgrown the allergy but I dont want to give you a false sense of security either. I hope for your sake that you are one of the lucky ones but the reality is that its not likely. The allergy is managable and you CAN keep your son safe. It takes alot of education and vigilance on your part. People who dont have to deal with food allergies can be very difficult. Just stay strong and persistent. They really dont understand what you are dealing with. Its sad but true. You will get through all of this!! Stay strong!!
Julie

Posted on: Mon, 10/18/2004 - 2:19am
momtomitchell's picture
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Joined: 04/20/2004 - 09:00

Welcome! I'm sorry it had to be under these circumstances. I found out my son was allergic to peanuts through testing after reacting to eggs. The others all gave you great advice, and definately call the pediatrician to get an Epi Pen Jr. They shouldn't have a problem writing a prescription for only one until you see the allergist.

Posted on: Mon, 10/18/2004 - 4:06pm
tsowka72's picture
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Joined: 10/16/2004 - 09:00

Thank you again everybody, you have been a great source of comfort. I called the ER today that saw my son on Fri. the doctor wrote me a prescription for the epi jr. Now my next problem. We are actually visiting my sister in California we are from Minnesota. When I called today to get in to see the allergist they informed me my insurance will not cover out of state care for my son. The allergist receptionist said as long as we have the epi pen he would be ok till we got home in a month. We are due to fly next week to Mississippi to see my other sister before going home. Will he be ok to fly as long as we have the epi? should i cancel our plans and just pay to see the allergist here in California before going home? This is really driving my NUTS!!! Thank you again for all of your great advice and comforting thoughts.Teri

Posted on: Mon, 10/18/2004 - 10:11pm
Going Nuts's picture
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Joined: 10/04/2001 - 09:00

Can you call your airline to see if they can serve something other than peanuts for their inflight snack? What airline are you flying?
When you do fly, make sure to only feed your child what you have brought yourself, so you don't take any unnecessary risks while airborne.
There's no reason to postpone until after seeing the allergist, because there's really nothing else they will be able to do for you (in terms of air travel). In terms of airport security, be sure to keep the original box that the epipen came in, with the original label. If you are careful about what you feed him and have the epi, you should be fine.
Enjoy the rest of your visit.
Amy

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